Has any forum members had/got Covid-19?

kenny007

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As the title sugests.

Would be good to know their experiences if they think they may have had this vile bug.

Anyone who has please accept my sympathy and hope you have a speedy recovery.
 
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mc andy

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It is a interesting question and something I can't actually answer as I know people off with all the symptoms but none confirmed. One had to go to a clinic yesterday as her condition was worsening but seen doctors but not actually checked. Sorry meant to say tested.
 
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Rrrr

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Friend of mine who i fish with has it currently and said it wasnt much fun. Hes obsessed with keeping fit and lifting heavy things for no reason and said the fever wasnt too bad but the tight chest wasnt fun at all and his lungs will be in good condition. He seems to be on the mend within a few days. His tips were to sleep as much as possible and to do so sitting up as it really helps.
Also to note, hes not been tested but has every one of the symptoms and exactly as described.

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charlieH

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Not a forum member, but I had an email yesterday from a mutual friend with the sad news that David Hodgkiss had died as a result of Covid 19. Given that this is now being reported in the press, I think I can now share it publicly here; there will probably be a few members who, like me, counted him as a friend or at least came across him on a riverbank somewhere.

David Hodgkiss: Lancashire CCC chairman dies after contracting coronavirus - BBC Sport

David was a lifelong and passionate fisherman; he probably spent most of his fishing time on various beats up and down the Tweed, but fished many other rivers both here and abroad over the years. In 2012 he caught a 56lb fish from the Alta, which I believe was the largest salmon caught anywhere that year.
 

MCXFisher

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Daughter and son in law in London - week before last, both got over it in 6-8 days total

Salmon fishing son and daughter in law in Cambridge, as above.

I'm uncertain whether they were recorded as cases.

One salmon fishing and shooting friend in North Yorkshire, still suffering after a week.
 

pol_angler

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There is one very good angler fighting Covid-19. Please refer to Wye 2020 thread to wish him well.
 

offshore

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Daughter and son in law in London - week before last, both got over it in 6-8 days total

Salmon fishing son and daughter in law in Cambridge, as above.

I'm uncertain whether they were recorded as cases.

One salmon fishing and shooting friend in North Yorkshire, still suffering after a week.
That's a bit close to home, to say the least - but at least the younger section have got it out of the way.

I see vulnerable people everyday, so doing my level best to avoid catching it (obviously). But I suspect this is going to curtail or stop many of my activities for the rest of the year - but I can see no other option as it stands.

Roll on a vaccine ! (2021)
 

westie4566

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Daughter and son in law in London - week before last, both got over it in 6-8 days total

Salmon fishing son and daughter in law in Cambridge, as above.

I'm uncertain whether they were recorded as cases.

One salmon fishing and shooting friend in North Yorkshire, still suffering after a week.
Glad to hear they've got through it Michael. A troubling time for all and even more so for yourself worrying about family and friends.

I'm just about to watch today's toll of doom and gloom, the 10 c'clock news.
 

keirstream

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My boy, who is a pilot with Jet2 contracted it after 2 flights to Tenerife in the same week.
He struggled for about 8 days with fevers, difficulty breathing and nausea along with the ubiquitous dry cough.
He actually phoned the docs when he was feeling real bad and was told just to continue to self isolate. In other words, keep it till it gets better.:)
 

westie4566

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My boy, who is a pilot with Jet2 contracted it after 2 flights to Tenerife in the same week.
He struggled for about 8 days with fevers, difficulty breathing and nausea along with the ubiquitous dry cough.
He actually phoned the docs when he was feeling real bad and was told just to continue to self isolate. In other words, keep it till it gets better.:)
When was that Tam? Hope the young 'un is on the mend now?

Funnily enough, 5 weeks past Friday I came down with a nasty cough, feeling like s'hit warmed up, running a slight temp. Yet thought nowt of it. Same thing went through a few fishing pals around the same time and also the folks I meet daily walking the dogs. (It's not a case of a dog walking group...just a bunch of folks that I've met in the last year who's dogs all get on great and the 'adults' enjoy the blether). One's a GP and she's fairly convinced that we all had mild form of it, even before it was a 'thing'.
 

mows

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As the title sugests.

Would be good to know their experiences if they think they may have had this vile bug.

Anyone who has please accept my sympathy and hope you have a speedy recovery.
How will we ever know if we have it.
140000 tested out of 68million on a virus that supposed to be spreading right across the country.
Statistically thats literally no one!
With out testing to work out what % of population have contracted it, how will we ever be able to develop suitable strategies to manage and control.
We cant tell how well it spreads, how it spreads, what the death rate is,if the weather/season has an effect.
We don't even seem to have the capacity to copy best practices from around the world.
As an island we should have been in a far better position than most countries, yet our policy seemed to almost be
Bring it in Lads!!!
 

squimp

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Indeed, how will we know ?

My other half was in Spain 3 weeks ago and since returning home has been off colour - temperature spikes, aches and pains etc. I’ve had similar and then a complete energy crash on Saturday which required 4 hours doing nothing. Yesterday I was much better as long as I took things steady. Needless to say we are self isolating.

Hopefully (!) we might have had a mild form of Covid. But we won’t know we have had it until we get tested - which is very unlikely to happen; or if we catch a ‘nasty’ version at a later date then we will know we haven’t had it already !

Strange times.....

Keep safe everybody.
 

reservoirrobert

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Based on Mows final comment " Bring it in Lads " , I was reading that Conor Mcgregor was advocating that ROI close all their airports so I just wondered what is the situation here , I looked on Arrivals Heathrow and was quite surprised to see 16 arrivals from places like New York City and other hotspots in a 15 minute period.
 

Sarcy

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If you’ve been tested and the test was positive then that’s the only way to know if you actually had the virus. The rest is just speculation!!
 

Rrrr

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Are these new mass/quick tests they are getting not to test for antibodies to see of you have had it rather than currently have it ?

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AlanT

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At the end of January I was hospitalised twice within a week for a severe breathing problem. I have asthma and have had a few episodes of bronchitis and peneumonia in the past but it's fairly well controlled

People with asthma will know what it feels like to have an attack (easy to breathe in, hard to breathe out coupled with a wheeze), similarily pneumonia (high temp, congested lungs, weak cough).

This however was very different. I'd had a relentless cough for a couple of days along with a with an increasing temperature. Then the breathing problems started, it felt like I was suffocating, no wheeze, no congestion, I was breathing but felt like no oxygen was being converted in my lungs. One morning at 4am I was struggling to get a breath and had to call NHS24 who then advised me to go to hospital. I was reviewed, advised to increase my inhaler useage and sent home, they told me it was just some kind of virus or seasonal flu (although I'd had the flu virus jag) coupled with a panic attack. Hmm? It didn't fill me with confidence.

Things got worse over the next two days, I could not shake the cough and my breathing was dire. Luckily my wife was on hand and called NHS 24 again, but as she was calling I was at the point of not being able to breathe at all (my lips were literally turning blue!). The call operator said to call an ambulance or, as I only stay 3 min drive from the nearest hospital, get someone to drive me there and she would call ahead and ensure that I was seen right away. My wife decided to drive as there was no guarantee of an ambulance right away. Risky strategy as I was in real trouble at that point. I never told my wife but I did actually think that I might stop breathing altogether.

Anybody that has had frequent asthma attacks that you need to keep very very calm as stress can make it worse. I honestly had to use all my years of 'training' to keep calm and try to scavenge as much air as possible until I got to hospital.

I was was treated with the usual nebuliser, antibiotics and steroids (which Im still on). The doctor said he didn't know what it was as there was no wheeze (so not asthma) and could not be sure it was pneumonia so put it down as a 'full respratory tract infection'.

I improved a little over the next week and was due to go on holiday to Dubai to celebrate our 25th silver wedding. We deliberated going, even up till the last day, but we went. It was a bit of a washout as I was so weak, we only done 1/2 of what we planned. My wife still reminded me that I complained that we'd arranged all these nice restuarants but I thought the food was bland! I still have no sense of taste!

My best friend saw me around 3 weeks after I went into hospital and said he's never seen me so ill, and we've been friends over 40 years. I lost over a stone in weight.

So, apologies for the long boring story, and I'm just telling at it was, no exaggerations, but 7 weeks on I am still exhausted and still on steroids (hence no TOTM or anything atm, sorry Ian :thumb: ). Luckily I can work from home but that is even a chore

I feel like Ive had a lucky escape from something. I've wracked my brain and can see no other possibility than it was CV. But I suppose I'll never know.

A
 

Tangled

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Doctor thinks my daughter has it. She's in the front line being a teacher looking after the kids of critical workers with absolutely no protection so it's no surprise.

She comes out of isolation tomorrow. She still has no smell or taste but for the first time reckons tooth paste tastes of something. She had this loss of smell without a cold - a weird thing. It's not being officially called a symptom that's definitive, but it's becoming clear that it may very well be one. She didn't have any other symptoms. If this is true, she got really lucky.

By now you will probably be well aware that a cough, shortness of breath or high temperature are warning signs of Covid-19, and anyone who gets them needs to self-isolate for seven days. But another odd symptom seems to be a calling card: a sudden loss of smell, which is not caused by a blocked nose.
The symptom appears to be incredibly common even though it is not yet widely discussed in the UK. More than two-thirds of those with coronavirus in Germany have lost their sense of smell, and 30 per cent of sufferers in South Korea have had anosmia as their main symptom, according to a report from ENT UK, an organisation which represents ear, nose and throat surgeons.

The smell loss associated with coronavirus is different to that which you might get with a normal cold, says Professor Claire Hopkins, president of the British Rhinological Society. “Typically when you have a cold your nose is congested, and therefore no-one is surprised you can’t smell”, she says. “But what’s happening here is there is no nasal obstruction so people are really surprised.”

The best guess of experts so far seems to be that Covid-19 is affecting the smell nerves in the nose. “We have seen evidence showing how the virus has the ability to affect the nerves, and the smell nerves are the only bits that are exposed in a way that no other nerves are”, says Professor Carl Philpott, professor of rhinology at the University of East Anglia. He believes that the virus causes neuronitis, or inflammation of the nerves in the nose, which stops them from performing as they should.

Professor Hopkins adds that the virus could even enter into the brain and cause further effects on the sense of smell, although this is not necessarily something to worry about: “Viral invasion is common but it sounds worse than it is.” She says that many rhinoviruses and coronaviruses which cause the common cold do this.

But no-one is yet completely sure for the reasons for the smell loss. Doing further research at present is difficult, says Professor Philpott: “We would need to examine the noses, and that’s what we’re telling people not to do as it puts the doctor at massive risk.”

Some patients who are reporting smell loss are also saying that they have lost their ability to taste. The likelihood is they are mistaking smell for taste, says Professor Philpott. “When you’re eating 80 per cent of what you appreciate of flavour is the smell, so people think they can’t taste even though they can still get salty, sweet, bitter and sour.”

Some patients are even experiencing dysgeusia: things tasting different to normal. Most people suffering this are describing a “metallic taste”, says Professor Hopkins. “That does suggest other neurological manifestations as you should retain sweet, salty and so on. It suggests there is something going on in your brain potentially.”

The good news is that the coronavirus-induced anosmia looks like it will be temporary; most patients who have reported it so far describe their sense of smell returning within a fortnight says Professor Hopkins.

It could be that smell loss is not the only symptom of coronavirus that the UK is not yet picking up on. Many other countries are not focusing as narrowly on cough and temperature as we are: France’s diagnostic test asks 23 questions which cover sore throat, tiredness and aches, as well as loss of smell and taste. Professor Hopkins has seen some more unusual symptoms herself: “I’ve had a couple of colleagues say they had hearing loss or a burning sensation in their nose.”

The most important thing is to take smell loss seriously as a potential symptom of coronavirus. If you have suddenly lost your sense of smell, you should follow the recommendations for those with a new cough or temperature, says Professor Kumar, and isolate yourself for at least seven days. “For social distancing to work we need to make sure people are not spreading it around”, he says.
 

Safranfoer

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Are these new mass/quick tests they are getting not to test for antibodies to see of you have had it rather than currently have it ?

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Yes - I'm not sure there is any confidence/clarity around reinfection rates yet, but in the short term at least, knowing you've had it does mean you present less of a risk to those around you:

"Antibodies are produced about 5–7 days after a coronavirus infection as part of the immune response.

"If a person has antibodies, it might be because of a recent and active infection, or because they had SARS-CoV-2 infection in the past, which in many cases may have been asymptomatic. If a sick patient is tested before they have developed antibodies, they will test negative, despite having an active infection.

Antibodies typically persist at measurable levels for many months or years after viral infections. So, antibody tests are best used for surveys trying to find out how many people have been infected by SARS-CoV-2. This number may be much larger than the number of cases identified by hospitals. This gives more accurate information about the extent of disease spread in a population.

"Antibody tests are also important because they can identify healthcare workers and others who have had infection in the past. These people are likely to be at very much reduced risk of becoming reinfected if exposed to people with active infection. Because of this they should be able to care more safely for those with active infection than staff who have not yet had the infection.

"It seems likely that this immunity may wear off over time (many months or years). It is also possible that the virus will evolve by mutating to a new strain that can escape the immune response to earlier strains. This is another reason why vaccination is so important and why a vaccine, once found, may need to be updated regularly, as is the case for flu vaccines."

Testing for the new coronavirus
 

Oscar

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Daughter and son in law in London - week before last, both got over it in 6-8 days total

Salmon fishing son and daughter in law in Cambridge, as above.

I'm uncertain whether they were recorded as cases.

One salmon fishing and shooting friend in North Yorkshire, still suffering after a week.
All the best to all your family Michael.

I haven't had it and still don't even know anybody who has.

Oscar.
 

keirstream

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When was that Tam? Hope the young 'un is on the mend now?
.
A month ago now. Still has the cough but has no idea if he has definitely had Covid as there was no offer of a consultation or medicines. Just self isolate and keep it till it gets better. And no testing.:(
 

peterchilton

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Another problem even with testing is that it only tells you that you do not have it at the point of being tested, the very next time that you interact with the world you could get it and your negative test will be misleading. It does seem that the antibodies test is the only real way of knowing if you have had it or not. People claiming to have it without being tested muddies the water.
 

Rrrr

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At the end of January I was hospitalised twice within a week for a severe breathing problem. I have asthma and have had a few episodes of bronchitis and peneumonia in the past but it's fairly well controlled

People with asthma will know what it feels like to have an attack (easy to breathe in, hard to breathe out coupled with a wheeze), similarily pneumonia (high temp, congested lungs, weak cough).

This however was very different. I'd had a relentless cough for a couple of days along with a with an increasing temperature. Then the breathing problems started, it felt like I was suffocating, no wheeze, no congestion, I was breathing but felt like no oxygen was being converted in my lungs. One morning at 4am I was struggling to get a breath and had to call NHS24 who then advised me to go to hospital. I was reviewed, advised to increase my inhaler useage and sent home, they told me it was just some kind of virus or seasonal flu (although I'd had the flu virus jag) coupled with a panic attack. Hmm? It didn't fill me with confidence.

Things got worse over the next two days, I could not shake the cough and my breathing was dire. Luckily my wife was on hand and called NHS 24 again, but as she was calling I was at the point of not being able to breathe at all (my lips were literally turning blue!). The call operator said to call an ambulance or, as I only stay 3 min drive from the nearest hospital, get someone to drive me there and she would call ahead and ensure that I was seen right away. My wife decided to drive as there was no guarantee of an ambulance right away. Risky strategy as I was in real trouble at that point. I never told my wife but I did actually think that I might stop breathing altogether.

Anybody that has had frequent asthma attacks that you need to keep very very calm as stress can make it worse. I honestly had to use all my years of 'training' to keep calm and try to scavenge as much air as possible until I got to hospital.

I was was treated with the usual nebuliser, antibiotics and steroids (which Im still on). The doctor said he didn't know what it was as there was no wheeze (so not asthma) and could not be sure it was pneumonia so put it down as a 'full respratory tract infection'.

I improved a little over the next week and was due to go on holiday to Dubai to celebrate our 25th silver wedding. We deliberated going, even up till the last day, but we went. It was a bit of a washout as I was so weak, we only done 1/2 of what we planned. My wife still reminded me that I complained that we'd arranged all these nice restuarants but I thought the food was bland! I still have no sense of taste!

My best friend saw me around 3 weeks after I went into hospital and said he's never seen me so ill, and we've been friends over 40 years. I lost over a stone in weight.

So, apologies for the long boring story, and I'm just telling at it was, no exaggerations, but 7 weeks on I am still exhausted and still on steroids (hence no TOTM or anything atm, sorry Ian :thumb: ). Luckily I can work from home but that is even a chore

I feel like Ive had a lucky escape from something. I've wracked my brain and can see no other possibility than it was CV. But I suppose I'll never know.

A
Ive had asthma since i was a kid and know what you mean about staying relaxed, its hard not to panic but you have to get used to the idea of just clearing your head and concentrating on "breathe in, breathe out". If youve never experienced it before it must be scary. Im lucky that mines well controlled with a new inhalor i was given a few years back so im hoping that may be enough as i can now max out the peak flow meters etc where i couldnt before. Ive upped my spiromax inhalor to max doseage for the moment to prepare just incase.

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AlanT

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Ive had asthma since i was a kid and know what you mean about staying relaxed, its hard not to panic but you have to get used to the idea of just clearing your head and concentrating on "breathe in, breathe out". If youve never experienced it before it must be scary. Im lucky that mines well controlled with a new inhalor i was given a few years back so im hoping that may be enough as i can now max out the peak flow meters etc where i couldnt before. Ive upped my spiromax inhalor to max doseage for the moment to prepare just incase.

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Yes I think that having asthma on one hand makes the situation worse if you have CV, but on the other hand you have experience being short of breath and maybe be able to handle it better. The main thing for anybody if they get shortness of breath from asthma, coronovirus or whatever is to keep very, very, calm and put yourself into a super calm zone where youre only thinking about breathing ian and breathing out', and for everybody around you to keep very calm. If they can't then they have to leave the room.
 

Rrrr

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Yes I think that having asthma on one hand makes the situation worse if you have CV, but on the other hand you have experience being short of breath and maybe be able to handle it better. The main thing for anybody if they get shortness of breath from asthma, coronovirus or whatever is to keep very, very, calm and put yourself into a super calm zone where youre only thinking about breathing ian and breathing out', and for everybody around you to keep very calm. If they can't then they have to leave the room.
Maybe worth practising the breathing techniques for others that havent had the expeience. I find that sitting up straight with my hands on or behind my head helps me then in through the nose, count to 3 then out through the mouth slowly as i can manage works best for me. No doubt there will be a video somewhere with other ways to do it. Best to figure it out now rather than being caught off gaurd.

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