Giant beavers.

Safranfoer

Well-known member
Messages
9,063
Reaction score
2,478
Ok. I see the problem now. That looks petrifying.

789B2088-3A88-47C6-B6B6-DEAEDB5DC183.jpeg
 

Fons

New member
Messages
24
Reaction score
20
Location
Belgium
I can imagine landowners are not happy. But I do not see the problem for anglers. Beavers are vegetarians! Beavers don't eat fish. From time to time a fallen tree in the river; is that a problem? Fallen trees are natural and safe harbours for fishes hiding for cormorants who are far more dangerous than beavers. I fish on a big river already housing several beaver families for many years. Early in the morning or late in the evening I often have the honor to observe them swimming upstream or downstream, or going ashore to eat from fresh plants. When I see them approaching in time, I stop fishing, try to take my camera, keep my self silent and a bit camouflaged and that is enough (they do not see quite good) to watch them passing only a few meters in front of me. It happened I was doing some casting close to a serious "mountain" of wood. As they are curious like a little robin, they came out to see what was happing outside. Without knowing, I was standing near their nest. What an experience I had that day? Fishing is so much more than only catching fish! Enjoing animals like beavers is a real bonus on my fishing day, for me as important as local scenery. I hope more anglers think so.
 

westie4566

Well-known member
Messages
9,058
Reaction score
3,157
Location
Aberdeen
I can imagine landowners are not happy. But I do not see the problem for anglers. Beavers are vegetarians! Beavers don't eat fish. From time to time a fallen tree in the river; is that a problem? Fallen trees are natural and safe harbours for fishes hiding for cormorants who are far more dangerous than beavers. I fish on a big river already housing several beaver families for many years. Early in the morning or late in the evening I often have the honor to observe them swimming upstream or downstream, or going ashore to eat from fresh plants. When I see them approaching in time, I stop fishing, try to take my camera, keep my self silent and a bit camouflaged and that is enough (they do not see quite good) to watch them passing only a few meters in front of me. It happened I was doing some casting close to a serious "mountain" of wood. As they are curious like a little robin, they came out to see what was happing outside. Without knowing, I was standing near their nest. What an experience I had that day? Fishing is so much more than only catching fish! Enjoing animals like beavers is a real bonus on my fishing day, for me as important as local scenery. I hope more anglers think so.
There is a flip side to the damage they do. Down on Tayside there's been mass deforestation carried out by them. This leads to the double whammy of dead tree roots no longer holding the rover banks together and their burrowing in the banks, again destabilising the river bank.

Along comes a big state and the banking collapses.
 

martymo

Member
Messages
669
Reaction score
4
Location
in a wee fish house
I can imagine landowners are not happy. But I do not see the problem for anglers. Beavers are vegetarians! Beavers don't eat fish. From time to time a fallen tree in the river; is that a problem? Fallen trees are natural and safe harbours for fishes hiding for cormorants who are far more dangerous than beavers. I fish on a big river already housing several beaver families for many years. Early in the morning or late in the evening I often have the honor to observe them swimming upstream or downstream, or going ashore to eat from fresh plants. When I see them approaching in time, I stop fishing, try to take my camera, keep my self silent and a bit camouflaged and that is enough (they do not see quite good) to watch them passing only a few meters in front of me. It happened I was doing some casting close to a serious "mountain" of wood. As they are curious like a little robin, they came out to see what was happing outside. Without knowing, I was standing near their nest. What an experience I had that day? Fishing is so much more than only catching fish! Enjoing animals like beavers is a real bonus on my fishing day, for me as important as local scenery. I hope more anglers think so.
There was an Eastern European killed from a beaver bite a few years ago. Bled to death on the bank after a nasty bite on the leg. I'd be careful round them, especially whilst they may have young.
 

SteveG

Well-known member
Messages
364
Reaction score
343
There was an Eastern European killed from a beaver bite a few years ago. Bled to death on the bank after a nasty bite on the leg. I'd be careful round them, especially whilst they may have young.
I can remember my brother warning me about large beavers that frequented Newcastle quay side when I was a lad, they had been known to half kill a man and apparently one of his mates was nearly suffocated by one, beware of large beavers lads and stay safe 👍😆
 

goosander

Well-known member
Messages
4,017
Reaction score
451
Location
Paisley strathclyde.
I can imagine landowners are not happy. But I do not see the problem for anglers. Beavers are vegetarians! Beavers don't eat fish. From time to time a fallen tree in the river; is that a problem? Fallen trees are natural and safe harbours for fishes hiding for cormorants who are far more dangerous than beavers. I fish on a big river already housing several beaver families for many years. Early in the morning or late in the evening I often have the honor to observe them swimming upstream or downstream, or going ashore to eat from fresh plants. When I see them approaching in time, I stop fishing, try to take my camera, keep my self silent and a bit camouflaged and that is enough (they do not see quite good) to watch them passing only a few meters in front of me. It happened I was doing some casting close to a serious "mountain" of wood. As they are curious like a little robin, they came out to see what was happing outside. Without knowing, I was standing near their nest. What an experience I had that day? Fishing is so much more than only catching fish! Enjoing animals like beavers is a real bonus on my fishing day, for me as important as local scenery. I hope more anglers think so.
They may be nice to you to look at but here [River Earn Perthshire] they are a complete menace ruining the flood banks and killing all the trees. There is one of our top pools which can only be fished in a wind. The beavers killed off all the trees in the flood plane and we now have a permanent swamp. If you think midges are bad just wait till the mossies [mosquitos] get on to you. There is also a pool where there was a row of willows down our side. They munched the willows down and left now the willows have grown like a hedge and the river has dug out a new channel through the adjoining fields.
Bob.
 

greenlaner2009

Well-known member
Messages
706
Reaction score
421
They may be nice to you to look at but here [River Earn Perthshire] they are a complete menace ruining the flood banks and killing all the trees. There is one of our top pools which can only be fished in a wind. The beavers killed off all the trees in the flood plane and we now have a permanent swamp. If you think midges are bad just wait till the mossies [mosquitos] get on to you. There is also a pool where there was a row of willows down our side. They munched the willows down and left now the willows have grown like a hedge and the river has dug out a new channel through the adjoining fields.
Bob.
The flood banks should not be there, that's that problem solved, a new channel cut thats river side diversity. Beaver don't kill native trees they coppice them leaves the stump alive that then produces multi stems just as nature intended. Any person who believes that man knows how to manage river banks or nature in general is foolish at best.
 

greenlaner2009

Well-known member
Messages
706
Reaction score
421
There was an Eastern European killed from a beaver bite a few years ago. Bled to death on the bank after a nasty bite on the leg. I'd be careful round them, especially whilst they may have young.
That was that bloke in Belarus who thought it was a good idea to try to hold onto the beaver to get a good photo of it.
 

goosander

Well-known member
Messages
4,017
Reaction score
451
Location
Paisley strathclyde.
The flood banks should not be there, that's that problem solved, a new channel cut thats river side diversity. Beaver don't kill native trees they coppice them leaves the stump alive that then produces multi stems just as nature intended. Any person who believes that man knows how to manage river banks or nature in general is foolish at best.
Foolish I would not know but I sure like to eat bread etc. which grows in the ruined fields. We have oaks/spruce and others that have butchered and they are dead. That is not what I would call coppicing.
Bob.
 

greenlaner2009

Well-known member
Messages
706
Reaction score
421
Foolish I would not know but I sure like to eat bread etc. which grows in the ruined fields. We have oaks/spruce and others that have butchered and they are dead. That is not what I would call coppicing.
Bob.
A flood plain is for a river to flood, I don't care one jot for the loss of crop, I don't believe a oak fallen by beaver is dead and the spruce is an introduced species and as such should not there. Also beaver do not fell spruce they don't eat the leaves or bark.
 

Safranfoer

Well-known member
Messages
9,063
Reaction score
2,478
Not commenting on beavers one way or another - I agree wholeheartedly that we need to stop mucking about with flood plains. Building houses on them, farming them... If we stopped trying to live over our landscape and learned to live with it, that would be great.

I read about plans for the Great North Bog this morning, to protect our peat. I feel like they need to give it a catchier name - but it sounded interesting. It's behind the Times paywall unfortunately... https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/...-bog-to-help-fix-our-climate-crisis-xkpbqbbz7
 

goosander

Well-known member
Messages
4,017
Reaction score
451
Location
Paisley strathclyde.
A flood plain is for a river to flood, I don't care one jot for the loss of crop, I don't believe a oak fallen by beaver is dead and the spruce is an introduced species and as such should not there. Also beaver do not fell spruce they don't eat the leaves or bark.
A flood plain is for a river to flood, I don't care one jot for the loss of crop, I don't believe a oak fallen by beaver is dead and the spruce is an introduced species and as such should not there. Also beaver do not fell spruce they don't eat the leaves or bark.
Have just been looking to see where you are based. No mention of were,
We have conifers eaten and oak trees felled which are dead. [Can show them to anyone that wants to see them.]
Will offer you the same as anyone else the chance to come and see the damage done
Have no wish to see the beavers exterminated but they need to be controlled.
Agree that flood plains should be just that but nowadays there is a great demand for home grown food.
Both of us are possibly entrenched in our views which I consider to be good for a healthy debate.
Bob.
 

Roag Fisher

Well-known member
Messages
2,184
Reaction score
680
Location
Isle of Lewis
Have just been looking to see where you are based. No mention of were,
We have conifers eaten and oak trees felled which are dead. [Can show them to anyone that wants to see them.]
Will offer you the same as anyone else the chance to come and see the damage done
Have no wish to see the beavers exterminated but they need to be controlled.
Agree that flood plains should be just that but nowadays there is a great demand for home grown food.
Both of us are possibly entrenched in our views which I consider to be good for a healthy debate.
Bob.
TB listed all the species of tree the beavers had chewed in the Murthly area. It would have been easier for him to list the few they leave alone.
 

greenlaner2009

Well-known member
Messages
706
Reaction score
421
Have just been looking to see where you are based. No mention of were,
We have conifers eaten and oak trees felled which are dead. [Can show them to anyone that wants to see them.]
Will offer you the same as anyone else the chance to come and see the damage done
Have no wish to see the beavers exterminated but they need to be controlled.
Agree that flood plains should be just that but nowadays there is a great demand for home grown food.
Both of us are possibly entrenched in our views which I consider to be good for a healthy debate.
Bob.
Bob are there many beavers on the smaller feeder streams and what sort of impact are they having there. Its the habitat of these streams is where I think the beaver can do an important job.
 

goosander

Well-known member
Messages
4,017
Reaction score
451
Location
Paisley strathclyde.
Bob are there many beavers on the smaller feeder streams and what sort of impact are they having there. Its the habitat of these streams is where I think the beaver can do an important job.
The contractor that rents the fields has an 18 ton digger he has to bring in to clear what are only ditches.
A bit of history to show my points.
There has been a beaver lodge in a wood at the side of the river for well over 30 years. We would look out to see the beavers as it was another wild creature to add to the days pleasure. The Tay beaver group done a study a few years back and I was showing the people were the beavers were. Some damage to the trees but not to much or to the banks. Since then the damage done by the beavers is massive. Other beats on the river that I know have had the same problem. Friend sent me a photo of a beaver walking across the bridge in Creiff.
While I agree that flood plains should not be built on, just left for summer grazing. Looking at the news down south and Country file there are massive areas of land built on flood plains. Some of the houses are several hundred years old and never been flooded before.
Bob.
 

goosander

Well-known member
Messages
4,017
Reaction score
451
Location
Paisley strathclyde.
The Tay Board said in a recent report that staff were having to spend more and more time keeping spawning burns clear. I cannot for the life of me see how a beaver dam can help salmonids.
I can not understand how a dam is of any help in these crowded islands. Just causes another thing for the fish to get over and the silt will waste any gravel for spawning.
My biggest problem with all this rewilding is that fish for example [salmon] are dying out and yet creatures that have not been here for century's are trying to be reintroduced. Why not look after what we have,
Bob.
 

SteveG

Well-known member
Messages
364
Reaction score
343
I can not understand how a dam is of any help in these crowded islands. Just causes another thing for the fish to get over and the silt will waste any gravel for spawning.
My biggest problem with all this rewilding is that fish for example [salmon] are dying out and yet creatures that have not been here for century's are trying to be reintroduced. Why not look after what we have,
Bob.
I would imagine it’s all about the passage of water and slowing it down , I know for years they said my local river was under threat from the peat harvesting in the moors, they warned it was like a sponge to retain water and loss of it would change the way the river reacts to additional water introduced upstream. Most thought cobblers but look at the change in the way floods behave these days dropping out faster than they did, not commenting on the extreme weather we get I’m taking about the normal in season rain
 
Top