Food standards

salarchaser

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Not sure how this will pan out in the current climate.
The uk has some of the highest standards for food production in the world.
Farmed salmon being the possible exception.

Higher standards invariably tend toward higher cost, but is it a price worth paying?
With many people having reduced income as a result of the virus, will there be an appetite to pay extra for higher standards?

Personal choice is one thing, but how about school meals or hospital meals where an individual has no say on the source of the produce in what they get served.

I admit to watching this closely as I have a vested interest.
Though our hobby farm we provide low volumes of lamb into the food chain.

With all that is going on at present, is animal welfare and food standards even registering on people's radar?



And if anyone is interested in signing the petition.

 

iainmortimer

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Sadly while I support the intent and view I cannot ever see that being applied. The simple reason being that If you consider some of the schemes Global GAP, Leaf and Freedom Foods there is no single standard that meets what would be considered the UK standard. That means that to apply the standard you could in effect only buy British which falls massively short of the volume required and so would lead to empty shelves and even higher prices. It is for that sole reason that much of the pork in the UK is European even though their standards fall far short of ours.

Sadly the reality is that most people like the idea but only if they don't have to pay for it. That means we either accept the status quo and stand poud that our animals are well looked after, or we allow welfare standards to fall again and turn a blind eye to them. A bit of a Hobsons choice.

The same applies to cropping, transport of foods and chemical control. The one exception is Asian chicken which in my opinion is reared, butchered and packaged to a higher standard in the UK which may surprise a few people!

So in summary, calling for everyone to meet UK standard is unlikley to achieve much. Instead the debate needs to be had at a much more granular level either on specific sectors or even specific commodities such as your lamb.
 

Safranfoer

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I signed the petition days ago. Since then, I understand that we are proposing a dual tariff, where food that meets UK standards offers a more attractive rate to US exporters - so while in theory crappy meat could end up over here, in reality there are financial disincentives.

Can't see the Trump accepting that, but there you go.

I feel we should be applying any leverage we have (probably none) to food labelling, so that at least consumers have a choice - I understand America sees this as anti-competitive, though, so I don't understand what it means for current labelling practices, where we can see country of origin.

Defra has this to say on pesticides: https://deframedia.blog.gov.uk/2020/06/09/pesticide-regulations-in-new-trade-deals/

They said similar on chlorinated chicken and hormone-laden beef, but I can't find the link to it now.

I guess it comes down to whether we believe our negotiators will stick to their stated guns.
 

tenet

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we can choose not to buy it of course ... surely the UK produced goods will have a UK label and a none Halal designation?
Now there's a can of worms.


 

Safranfoer

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we can choose not to buy it of course ... surely the UK produced goods will have a UK label and a none Halal designation?
Apparently not - the US dislikes this practice as they feel it is anti-competitive. I am unsure whether a trade deal can change British labelling though?
 

iainmortimer

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So you condone the practice B?
I would not wish to offend any member of the Jewish or Islamic faith but I do find the practice distasteful and most certainly would not purchase any products slaughtered in this barbaric way.
Agreed but there is such a diverse range of standards that even with labelling its hard to be sure. i.e. NZ lamb is nearly all HALAL but it is also all stunned. The only difference is that its 'prayed over'. Likewise Kosher is not just one standard but there are different levels e.g.. Glatt and Kedassia with the latter being much stricter.
 

goosander

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Have been in slaughter houses in the past and the cruelty that goes on there is enough to put one off eating meat. Most of the people I saw doing the killing enjoyed there job. The way some are killed for a religion is disgraceful. A dozen or more beasts take out the lair and pushed down a narrow walkway. At the end they turn into the slaughter bin. The side come in and the roof comes down and the whole lot turns round so the cows legs are in the air. The priest ?? says a few words and then cuts the beast throat and the bin is opened up and the beast has a chain round its leg and hoisted up so it can bleed out.
What is the difference between chlorinated chicken and farmed salmon with all the chemicals they are fed.
Bob.
 

salarchaser

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Have been in slaughter houses in the past and the cruelty that goes on there is enough to put one off eating meat. Most of the people I saw doing the killing enjoyed there job. The way some are killed for a religion is disgraceful. A dozen or more beasts take out the lair and pushed down a narrow walkway. At the end they turn into the slaughter bin. The side come in and the roof comes down and the whole lot turns round so the cows legs are in the air. The priest ?? says a few words and then cuts the beast throat and the bin is opened up and the beast has a chain round its leg and hoisted up so it can bleed out.
What is the difference between chlorinated chicken and farmed salmon with all the chemicals they are fed.
Bob.
Im all for humane slaughter.
I dont condone ill treatment of livestock in life or in death.
Ive always said to my daughter that her lambs should be given the best life possible and be treated with respect.

On Wednesday evening we had an issue with a ewe lamb, about 4 months old.
The flock had been checked monday by my daughter and tuesday by my wife. No obvious issues. Wednesday evening my daughter spotted a lamb down. When she got to it, it was like it had rigormortiss, all joints stiff, but it was alive. Shallow breathing, eyes rolling. Called her usual vet and talked it through. Agreed there was no saving it so had the slaughterman round. Could have just left it overnight for it to die of to be had by a fox or badger, but did what was right for the animal, though not the bank balance.
She was on the phone to me in tears. The day she stops getting upset when an animal suffers or dies is the day I tell her to stop rearing them.

As for farmed salmon and chlorinated chicken, Im against both.
Chlorinated chicken isnt about the chlorine per se, its the multitude of sins in its rearing its trying to hide.
 
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Paul White

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Im all for humane slaughter.
I dont condone ill treatment of livestock in life or in death.
Ive always said to my daughter that her lambs should be given the best life possible and be treated with respect.

On Wednesday evening we had an issue with a ewe lamb, about 4 months old.
The flock had been checked monday by my daughter and tuesday by my wife. No obvious issues. Wednesday evening my daughter spotted a lamb down. When she got to it, it was like it had rigormortiss, all joints stiff, but it was alive. Shallow breathing, eyes rolling. Called her usual vet and talked it through. Agreed there was no saving it so had the slaughterman round. Could have just left it overnight for it to die of to be had by a fox or badger, but did what was right for the animal, though not the bank balance.
She was on the phone to me in tears. The day she stops getting upset when an animal suffers or dies is the day I tell her to stop rearing them.

As for farmed salmon and chlorinated chicken, Im against both.
Chlorinated chicken isnt about the chlorine per se, its the multitude of sins in its rearing its trying to hide.
Like the huge amount of steroids pumped into beef cattle on the feedlots of the midwest USA.
 

iainmortimer

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As a Christian its saddens me that the country declares itself to be secular. However, even worse is that while doing it lacks the courage to do what is right for people and animals and slaughter without stunning can never be right in my eyes. We're supposed to be good custodians and shepherds of the world not abusers and defilers of it. Sadly, in many cases, we are no better than the Covid virus that we all hate...
 

bluejay

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The move in the US years ago was to get better labeling, specially for GMO products. The big food corps lobby was so powerful it stopped more labeling despite polls and referendums showing the vast majority of the public wanted it. Even the GMO salmon (frankenfish) does not require labeling in the US. There are producers who do label organic, non GMO, and wild vs farmed salmon, and so if it does not have that label it is probably GMO or not organic. The more that buy labeled clean food create a market for these products and producers do respond. If you want to buy the cheapest food, well you get what you pay for. I've seen the relative price of these cleaner products go down over the years. We vote and influence through our purchases, but not as much or as fast as we'd like. Buying from known local sources is more reliable
 

goosander

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Just wondering if the rainbows that we catch which are stocked 2lbs.plus and caught a few weeks later are the same as farmed salmon when on the plate.
Bob.
 

salarchaser

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Just wondering if the rainbows that we catch which are stocked 2lbs.plus and caught a few weeks later are the same as farmed salmon when on the plate.
Bob.
Its a fair shout.
Dont tend to keep rainbows for us to eat.
Wild brownies though........

Cant say Ive seen or heard of the issues accociated with farmed salmon with farmed trout.
Water quality, fresh / salt water perhaps?
Maybe Loxie can give some insight.
 

goosander

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The overwintered rainbows that we get are solid and are good eating hot smoked. What makes me ask is that when I started fishing and browns stocked as yearlings were about 4- 6 inches long and our 2 year olds were 6-8 inches long. Now due to "improved" fish food they are 10-12 inches long.
Bob.
 
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