Food for thought

Dalnashaugh

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A friend recently drew my attention to a dramatic change in the EU Total Allowable Catch of sandeel in the North Sea. Each December or thereabouts the total allowable catches of various species are set for the following year at an EU Fisheries Council meeting. It seems that the decisions reached at this meeting are based largely on advice on fish stocks etc provided by ICES ( International Council for the Exploration of the Sea).
In 2016 the total allowable catch ( TAC) of sandeel in the north sea was 79,219 tonnes. For 2017 this was increased to 486,115 tonnes! I believe that this figure is also the TAC for 2018.

In the document I've seen there are the following paragraphs -

" Setting the TAC for sandeel in the north sea for 2017 following the release of the annual scientific advice provided by ICES... The timing of this agreement is of primary importance to the Danish fleet which hold the majority of the quota, as the TAC needs to be adopted and enter into force in order for the fishing season to start on 1 April 2017."

" The UK,Denmark,Germany and Sweden share the North Sea sandeel TAC, with Denmark holding the largest share: 94% of the overall EU quota. The proposed combined TAC for 2017 is 486,115 tonnes which represents an increase of 406,896 tonnes ( 514%) from last year. This substantial increase follows the latest scientific advice from ICES which reflects changes in the assessment methodology and historic input data, and indications of good recruitment in some areas for this short lives species. The UK interest in the sandeel fishery is very low and we only have a 2% share of the quota. The UK didn't use any of the quota in 2016."
 

Dave Wilkinson

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Disgrace

Yes, put it on here last year but the EU Fisheries Minister rejected my complaint.

One saving grace is that certain banks off the Scottish East Coast are protected from this over-exploitation.

p.s. Anyone interested in the details of this fishery and its possible impact might like to read the detailed report published by the AST in a Blue Book some years ago. Either the AST/ DAFS put observers on two Danish boats. The main problem is the exploitation of Dogger Bank sandeel areas as some of our NE sea-trout migrate there. Try Googling: Atlantic Salmon Trust Sandeel Research or similar terms or contact me. There is a concern about a smolt by-catch of this fishery and its sea-bird impact.That is probably why there is an East Coast restriction. Cheers Dave

P.S. Here is the LINK: Page]Page not found | environmentdata.org not found | environmentdata.org. SORRY. Site will not accept the link. please PM me and I'll send it to anyone interested.


A friend recently drew my attention to a dramatic change in the EU Total Allowable Catch of sandeel in the North Sea. Each December or thereabouts the total allowable catches of various species are set for the following year at an EU Fisheries Council meeting. It seems that the decisions reached at this meeting are based largely on advice on fish stocks etc provided by ICES ( International Council for the Exploration of the Sea).
In 2016 the total allowable catch ( TAC) of sandeel in the north sea was 79,219 tonnes. For 2017 this was increased to 486,115 tonnes! I believe that this figure is also the TAC for 2018.

In the document I've seen there are the following paragraphs -

" Setting the TAC for sandeel in the north sea for 2017 following the release of the annual scientific advice provided by ICES... The timing of this agreement is of primary importance to the Danish fleet which hold the majority of the quota, as the TAC needs to be adopted and enter into force in order for the fishing season to start on 1 April 2017."

" The UK,Denmark,Germany and Sweden share the North Sea sandeel TAC, with Denmark holding the largest share: 94% of the overall EU quota. The proposed combined TAC for 2017 is 486,115 tonnes which represents an increase of 406,896 tonnes ( 514%) from last year. This substantial increase follows the latest scientific advice from ICES which reflects changes in the assessment methodology and historic input data, and indications of good recruitment in some areas for this short lives species. The UK interest in the sandeel fishery is very low and we only have a 2% share of the quota. The UK didn't use any of the quota in 2016."
 
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Bushwhacker

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As a kid i could sit on my local pier and watch a constant 10ft wide stream of Sandeels swim past for the full 6 hour tide.
Now your lucky to see a shoal of 6 ft square every hour.
They have decimated the Sandeels in the north sea and the Danes are the biggest culprits, using them for fertiliser.
Tie this in with the explosion of Mackerel in the north part of the north sea and there won,t be any left in the not too distant future.
No wonder the Puffins,Razorbills and Guillemots are all disappearing.
 
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