Fluorocarbon Recommendations.

kimbo

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Thinking of trying this it's a good price and recommended
 

Jockiescott

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I don't want to derail this entire thread, but if fluorocarbon is being used only because it's thinner than Maxima (nylon) why not use thinner nylon? Fluorocarbon isn't any stronger than nylon by diameter, it's just a function of how much it's been stretched. The main difference between fluoro and nylon is that it sinks faster.

When I use 8lb maxima for hitch tubes etc. It breaks far more easily, under less pressure, than 13lb Seaguar when trying to pull flies from bushes.

I lose more flies using maxima than Seaguar at the same diameter.
 

Tangled

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When I use 8lb maxima for hitch tubes etc. It breaks far more easily, under less pressure, than 13lb Seaguar when trying to pull flies from bushes.
Well it would wouldn't it, it's 5lb weaker!

But it's possible to get nylon of the same thickness AND breaking strain as fluorocarbon, it will just have been drawn (heated and stretched) further than standard nylon.

When monofilament plastics (both nylons and fluorocarbons) are drawn it makes them both thinner and stronger (by aligning the molecules lengthways within them). Tensile strength increases in both but brittleness also increases - ie a gradual application of load will produce a given breaking strain, but a shock load will have a different one. Fluorocarbon has much lower shock strength than the same BS of nylon.

Maxima is nylon that has not been drawn as fine as so-call super-strong nylons so it has more elasticity and less brittleness.
 
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Jockiescott

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Well it would wouldn't it, it's 5lb weaker!

But it's possible to get nylon of the same thickness AND breaking strain as fluorocarbon, it will just have been drawn (heated and stretched) further than standard nylon.

When monofilament plastics (both nylons and fluorocarbons) are drawn it makes them both thinner and stronger (by aligning the molecules lengthways within them). Tensile strength increases in both but brittleness also increases - ie a gradual application of load will produce a given breaking strain, but a shock load will have a different one. Fluorocarbon has much lower shock strength than the same BS of nylon.

Maxima is nylon that has not been down as fine as so-call super-strong nylons so it has more elasticity and less brittleness.

I misunderstood the post I quoted.
 

simonjh98

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Seaguar soft plus for low water conditions as it is very supple. I like 10lb, 13lb or 18lb in it.

Seaguar Ace Hard for when there is water as it helps to turn over a little better as it is a bit more stiff than the soft plus range
 

JACK POWER

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I use Seaguar on the hols and if there's a chance of the fish I've been dreaming of since I was 12. For everyday stuff I use


and find it reliable to the point that I use it, successfully, in the 12lb version for spent gnat dry fly fishing. It is far less expensive than Seaguar

This knot is worth adding to your repertoire if you use fluorocarbon ...

 
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