Floating the worm

John Nugent

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Hi i never caught a Salmon on the worms came close a few times mostly when i am reeling in i get a strong pull when free lining. I would like to give the float a go i would like to know would you use a small chubber float or a stick float and how would you go about strike when floating? The river i fish is very slow moving to no flow when the water is low.
 

jonbhoy

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floating the worm is a good method, i prefer grayling float, but each to thier own, the good thing is you very rarely get stuck, and you can more or less scrape the bottom once you know the pool.
i always keep finger on the line as if you were trotting the worm, this way u will still feel a salmon take, i would wait until float stayed down a few seconds then just tighten up,no need to strike, but with fall fish to be returned on our water this year i have hit them as soon as, so that the hook is not down the neck.
its a good way of picking up fish, good in fast water too;)
 
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Get yourself a couple of Swan quills! you should find them along river banks they usally drop their feathers early Autum ready for their winter coat.

What I usually do is:
* Find a nice long swan quill/feather about 8"-10"
* Cut back the feathers until you have the bare quill/spine.
* You can varnish it with waterproof coating.
* Tie a wire into the bottom of the quill leaving a small hook to allow the line
to slip through (light wire the type used for a devon mount)
* Slip a small rubber tube cut skinny up the quill (usually valve rubber) this
will hold the line in place & will allow you to adjust your water depth.
* Steal one of your Kids marker tops/caps drill a tiny hole (I use a hot needle
heated) place the marker cap on the top of the quill.

Setup:

Run the swan quill/float setup up the line, tie/place a swivel beneath the quill, fix your led shot or twisted led enough to keep the quill upright, tie your worm hook on. I use 5 x worms 2 above the eye of the hook just bearly through the head & 3 cover the shank and shank barbs last worm cover the main hook barb.

Now your in action!! When John Willy tears your float down wait a secon or 2 & then sew it into him :D The Limerick way!
 

erukus

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Get yourself a couple of Swan quills! you should find them along river banks they usally drop their feathers early Autum ready for their winter coat.

What I usually do is:
* Find a nice long swan quill/feather about 8"-10"
* Cut back the feathers until you have the bare quill/spine.
* You can varnish it with waterproof coating.
* Tie a wire into the bottom of the quill leaving a small hook to allow the line
to slip through (light wire the type used for a devon mount)
* Slip a small rubber tube cut skinny up the quill (usually valve rubber) this
will hold the line in place & will allow you to adjust your water depth.
* Steal one of your Kids marker tops/caps drill a tiny hole (I use a hot needle
heated) place the marker cap on the top of the quill.

Setup:

Run the swan quill/float setup up the line, tie/place a swivel beneath the quill, fix your led shot or twisted led enough to keep the quill upright, tie your worm hook on. I use 5 x worms 2 above the eye of the hook just bearly through the head & 3 cover the shank and shank barbs last worm cover the main hook barb.

Now your in action!! When John Willy tears your float down wait a secon or 2 & then sew it into him :D The Limerick way!

I think an instructional video or picture series is in order/necessary. Thanks!
 

Saint Andrews

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Use a slider, 8 or 11g you'd use for prawn but don't put a stop knot on the line fish a paternoster rig using pencil lead. The float shoots up the line on the cast halfway between you and the bait and acts as a pully on the line gentally dragging the bait down and a cross. Don't use the float as bite indicator but have the line over finger as if free lining. Ideal method for slower flows
 
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RICO

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Came across this video on U tube :-


This method of float fishing the worm is commonly used on the Moy and, IMO, is one of the most exciting, visual methods I have ever fished the worm. Not only do you know where your worms are in the river, but, also you are aware of hitting a snag, and, on a majority of occasions the float will pull you out. And when you get a take, that is something else !!!
 

Woodsy

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Came across this video on U tube :-


This method of float fishing the worm is commonly used on the Moy and, IMO, is one of the most exciting, visual methods I have ever fished the worm. Not only do you know where your worms are in the river, but, also you are aware of hitting a snag, and, on a majority of occasions the float will pull you out. And when you get a take, that is something else !!!
I totally agree, a grilse taking small flies on full floater or even floating minitubes is a lovely visual take but nothing compares to seeing the float bounce and deciding when to strike. It's hard to beat. I love fishing this in high water but mid and low water is a pain with the amount of perch on the middle of the moy
 

RUSH

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I’ve done it a few times a few years ago 11ft pellet waggler rod 20 lb braid a 6g clear chubber i put the shot on the braid just above my swivel and about 18 inches of 12lb maxima to a size 6 hook, it’s very visual it’s great to see the float bump and know it’s a salmon good luck
 
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