Fishing from Boat and Upstream Wind

acerspader

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I was out fishing yesterday and was fishing from boat for a short while. Had a dreaded strong upstream wind to deal with. Wind was too strong for double spey or double circle spey/ snap t with casting anchors blowing in on top of me sitting in back of boat.

What cast would you use in this situation above?
 

Loxie

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I was out fishing yesterday and was fishing from boat for a short while. Had a dreaded strong upstream wind to deal with. Wind was too strong for double spey or double circle spey/ snap t with casting anchors blowing in on top of me sitting in back of boat.

What cast would you use in this situation above?

A low flick with a 20gm Toby!
 

neilt

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Overhead.
Spey to get it all straight, overhead to deliver.
Shorter leader, over downstream shoulder if someone else in boat, not shooting much running line.
Or as above, 30g Salmo.
 

dexterbuchanan1

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I was out fishing yesterday and was fishing from boat for a short while. Had a dreaded strong upstream wind to deal with. Wind was too strong for double spey or double circle spey/ snap t with casting anchors blowing in on top of me sitting in back of boat.

What cast would you use in this situation above?

Sorry never fished from a boat so cant quite picture this but

Why were you even attempting double speys
I feel a simple single spey(adjusting stroke for the wind) would be best
 

charlieH

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Sorry never fished from a boat so cant quite picture this but

Why were you even attempting double speys
I feel a simple single spey(adjusting stroke for the wind) would be best

The problem arises from the position of the gillie/boatman. As a rule, the rod sits or stands in the stern of the boat while the gillie is either at the bow controlling the rope as he gradually lets the boat downstream, or else (as is the custom on the Tweed), he is sitting amidships and controlling the boat's position with the oars. So he is just upstream of you, and hence potentially in the firing line of a single spey cast. Imagine yourself wading with someone standing about 6-10' upstream of you and you'll get the idea.

In answer to the OP, I suggest the first and most important thing is to ask the gillie how he would like you to fish. He'll have seen it before and should know the best solution (it may vary, depending on factors like the size of the boat). But you should be able to position your anchor a bit further upstream and/or forward so that the loop stays clear of him. It's easier to do this if you are standing in the boat, rather than sitting. You can also sometimes move further up the boat, so that you are closer to the gillie, which also helps ensure that the line is beyond him.

You may need to break some of the rules you were taught about what makes a conventionally 'good' Spey cast, but like so many things, once you know the rules you can then start to discover how they can be broken when the need arises.

But do always listen to the gillie. I worked with a Tweed boatman who had lost an eye to a badly cast fly. Their safety must be your first concern.
 

dexterbuchanan1

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The problem arises from the position of the gillie/boatman. As a rule, the rod sits or stands in the stern of the boat while the gillie is either at the bow controlling the rope as he gradually lets the boat downstream, or else (as is the custom on the Tweed), he is sitting amidships and controlling the boat's position with the oars. So he is just upstream of you, and hence potentially in the firing line of a single spey cast. Imagine yourself wading with someone standing about 6-10' upstream of you and you'll get the idea.

In answer to the OP, I suggest the first and most important thing is to ask the gillie how he would like you to fish. He'll have seen it before and should know the best solution (it may vary, depending on factors like the size of the boat). But you should be able to position your anchor a bit further upstream and/or forward so that the loop stays clear of him. It's easier to do this if you are standing in the boat, rather than sitting. You can also sometimes move further up the boat, so that you are closer to the gillie, which also helps ensure that the line is beyond him.

You may need to break some of the rules you were taught about what makes a conventionally 'good' Spey cast, but like so many things, once you know the rules you can then start to discover how they can be broken when the need arises.

But do always listen to the gillie. I worked with a Tweed boatman who had lost an eye to a badly cast fly. Their safety must be your first concern.
Thanks for that Charlie i now understand
 
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