Fish farming disaster again.

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https://thefishsite.com/articles/mo...4EzRvZk3t8l0bkj1fmRnzY6S0IBbfi_Zbw9yLSZyPpFDY

Another example why this rancid industry must be shut down. Who knows what system these fish will end up in. 70000+ 4lb mutants now free to roam. Rivers all along the west coast, north of Ireland etc will all probably get their share. This isn't just an SNP problem. The Tories, labour etc are also for the industry growing and in its current form. The greens do have a policy of no further expansion as things stand currently but surprisingly quiet on pushing for reform.

Here's Jamie Greene Tory MSP promoting another new farm on the Clyde.

Fish farm plan will create new jobs says firm | Largs and Millport Weekly News

There is still a petition to stop this latest application.

Stop proposed Cumbrae fish farms going ahead! | 38 Degrees
Please take a moment and sign.

Its an area I regularly sea fish and kayak around. Cumbrae is actually quite a special place. I've witnessed some spectacular wildlife scenes that wouldn't be a miss on a blue planet documentary. Early May last year as the mackerel arrive the waters just south of Bute and wee Cumbrae are absolutely alive with Gannets and porpoises. The numbers have to be seen to be believed. Believe me this is an area well worth protecting.

Photo taken from the south of Bute looking over onto Wee Cumbrae.
 

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ABK

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Governments are not interested in wild stocks, the only thing they are interested in is GDP figures. Salmon farming contributes to this. Salmon fishing by rod and line and its associated service industry does not. High time these farms were made to be land based self contained units.
 

morphfly

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These aren't the same salmon farms as proposed for Arran?. If they aren't then that part of the world is in big trouble.
Morphfly
 

charlieH

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The Colonsay escape was covered in BBC Radio 4's Farming Today programme this morning. It's not the first time they've discussed the salmon farming issue recently, and my impression is that the message about the problems within the industry has got some traction with the editors. On the whole I thought Guy Linley-Adams did well, and the man from Mowi was definitely on the back foot.

In the course of the interview I was also interested to hear GL-A mention a big new closed-containment near Boulogne. Despite what some nay-sayers were claiming a year or two ago, people are clearly prepared to invest considerable sums of money into closed-containment farms, which does give hope that there might really be a viable commercial future for them.

It's worth a listen - about 7 minutes in:

Farming Today - 22/01/20 Thousands of salmon escape from offshore farm, veterans for agriculture, sugar beet logistics - BBC Sounds
 

ozzyian

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Governments are not interested in wild stocks, the only thing they are interested in is GDP figures. Salmon farming contributes to this. Salmon fishing by rod and line and its associated service industry does not. High time these farms were made to be land based self contained units.
I fear you are right. Though just on a technical point they just really want the headline news of 'jobs in the highlands' I think.

Almost all of the production is foreign owned so profits are repatriated to Norway and Canada - wherever the HO is listed, only in that jurisdiction is corporation tax paid. Here the benefits are more limited to wages and suppliers and I suppose seabed rent - however that works. Many of the jobs are of course imports too, so there is less regional benefit in that regard too.
 

HOWKEMOOT

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Thanks Charlie for that. Yes I did read about that French farm.

Boulogne site for new land based salmon farm – Fish Farmer Magazine

Of course Scotland will be the last on the close containment bus by which stage it'll be pointless.
I would imagine that when this new RAS is up an running and hopefully it's followers will take a good deal of business from the Scottish farms, hooray. It has backing from the French Govt at many levels including financial. Why oh why did not wee nippy sweety and her INDYREF2 obsessed gang not just spend a moment on the day job and beat the French to it, what a win/win it would have been. However as they under the thrall of MOWI and others they cannot see the wood for the trees. What a lost opportunity. :eek:hwell:

M
 
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Walleye

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The Colonsay escape was covered in BBC Radio 4's Farming Today programme this morning. It's not the first time they've discussed the salmon farming issue recently, and my impression is that the message about the problems within the industry has got some traction with the editors. On the whole I thought Guy Linley-Adams did well, and the man from Mowi was definitely on the back foot.

In the course of the interview I was also interested to hear GL-A mention a big new closed-containment near Boulogne. Despite what some nay-sayers were claiming a year or two ago, people are clearly prepared to invest considerable sums of money into closed-containment farms, which does give hope that there might really be a viable commercial future for them.

It's worth a listen - about 7 minutes in:

Farming Today - 22/01/20 Thousands of salmon escape from offshore farm, veterans for agriculture, sugar beet logistics - BBC Sounds
Thanks for that.
The Mowi guy's response was pretty poor. Full of holes. Needed to be pressed more on some of the points I think.
Why would fish farmed on land taste worse than those farmed at sea? It's ridiculous, the taste and colour is provided artificially through the food they give them and on land they are much less likely to need all the drugs to keep them alive to harvest weight.
 

Walleye

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I would imagine that when this new RAS is up an running and hopefully it's followers will take a good deal of business from the Scottish farms, hooray. It has backing from the French Govt at many levels including financial. Why oh why did not wee nippy sweety and her INDYREF2 obsessed gang not just spend a moment on the day job and beat the French to it, what a win/win it would have been. However as they under the thrall of MOWI and others they cannot see the wood for the trees. What a lost opportunity. :eek:hwell:

M
The Boulogne fish farm is hugely significant. It's the start of the move away from remote locations due to reliance on cold seas, towards moving the production to where the processing and consumption takes place.
They've positioned it there for great reasons. All the technology and expertise that is needed for RAS and fish processing resides in Boulogne.
I'd like to see more companies doing this - get a bit of competition going and accelerate the move.
 

meyre

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Mowi's response is poor because, as Walleye suggests, land based RAS ( Recirculating Aquaculture Systems ) produce fish of similar or better quality than open water sites for less waste .
The Gloria Maris enclosed sites at Noirmoutier and Gravlines in France have produced dependable turbot + bass for a long time. French restaurants and supermarkets are very quality conscious , as are their customers. Other French sites use RAS for 'sea' trout and bream and salmon are an adaption that they are happily adopting.
Total quality of feed, method and product are guaranteed with little loss and almost no demand upon the environment. Waste is recycled, often into energy for the factory and fertiliser for sale. Feed costs are minimised, disease and water purity treated with UV. These are enclosed self-sufficient units using renewable energy which can be located near transport hubs and markets. The need for lengthy transport so eliminated.
The environmental , health and ''carbon'' burden is ultimately better. They are costly to set up . As 'open sites' have been freely offered for insignificant rents by North Atlantic governments. Mowi et al are spoilt and loathe to relinquish their subsidised farms.....but time and money is against them.
Already the Chinese are developing both by land and sea some massive farms not very far from Beijing in the Bohai Gulf of the northern Yellow Sea. Yes of course they'll have their own Salmo Salar.
The representative of Mowi will move on and the farms too.....perhaps too late for the Awe and the Carron or not if only the natural fish eventually persist?
 

SalmoNewf

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I fear you are right. Though just on a technical point they just really want the headline news of 'jobs in the highlands' I think.

Almost all of the production is foreign owned so profits are repatriated to Norway and Canada - wherever the HO is listed, only in that jurisdiction is corporation tax paid. Here the benefits are more limited to wages and suppliers and I suppose seabed rent - however that works. Many of the jobs are of course imports too, so there is less regional benefit in that regard too.
Not much money coming into Canada from aquaculture operations elsewhere, at least here on the East coast. All the major operations are Norwegian owned, primarily by Mowi and Grieg.
 
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