Extreme selfishness

salarchaser

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Just took a detour to the two garages nearest me as my wifes car is running on fumes.
Neither had any fuel.
 

Birkin

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Maincrop potatoes are harvested now. Which is good as cabbage, leeks, marrows, cauliflower, pumpkin, swede and turnip are all miserable. Cauliflower is evil. Cabbage is alright. Brexit just = school dinners. Yay. We took back control and it smells farty.
What are you talking about? All the veg you mention are staples and good for you. Not sure how Brexit features in school dinners. I think you need to take control and stop moaning.
 

Safranfoer

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So true Madcaster but it doesnt fit the narrative of being BoJo's fault.
The problem with being prime minister is that you have to respond to a million things that aren't your fault. He's just not very good at that. At inspiring confidence, at making quick decisions, at making unpopular decisions, at communicating any decisions he does make... He has the charisma of a leader, but very little else. The tanker driver shortage isn't his fault - but his actions won't make it better. His lack of diplomacy around our exit from the EU, and also lack of planning, mean that we're now in a position where few foreign lorry drivers seem very up for helping us bridge the gap between here and a future where our labour force is back up to number. - the RHA say it will be 3 years, even at the new accelerated test rate. When we had the last fuel crisis, Tony Blair did a press conference and spoke directly to people - Boris Johnson has been silent, the only comments adding fuel to the panic. He's just not very good at this and I find it baffling that anyone genuinely believes he is. Any criticism of him is met with, like to see Diane Abbott do better lol he's better than Corbyn lolol. Which are just non-sequiturs. Objectively speaking, is he really the best of the Conservative Party? Is he better than the candidates he beat, like Rory Stewart, or newer MPs like Siobhan Baillie or Claire Coutinho, or even my own constituency MP, whose politics I disagree with but even I can see he is hard working, open and communicative, and has a conscience?

Between the messes he makes and the messes of events and other people that just rise around him like turdy floodwater... He's not very good at this. As is evidenced by the fact that once again, he is 'battling' to save Christmas. I'm old enough to remember when Christmas just happened and didn't need saving from the consequences of Boris Johnson.

 
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Safranfoer

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What are you talking about? All the veg you mention are staples and good for you. Not sure how Brexit features in school dinners. I think you need to take control and stop moaning.
Taking control appears to mean accepting a reduction in standard of living to no noticeable societal effect, and with no end in sight. We haven't even hit the worst of disruption yet. That will happen post January. This is just the warm up. Short term pain for long term gain is all very well, but no one has outlined the gains yet - still - beyond romantic concepts of control and sovereignty, which are only benefits in an unglobalised economy.

I think moaning is a proportionate response to all the concurrent events. Hardship in service of glory is noble. Hardship in service of an ill-defined vision of 'control' - yeah, I'm struggling to swallow that AND my cauliflower, swede, pumpkin and cabbage. I imagined the sunlit uplands would consist of more than root vegetables, having to shop for milk every other day and accepting that this Christmas, turkey is off the menu, Christmas trees are in short supply and the kids' presents won't get through customs. Is all. I don't want or need MORE than I ever had, and of course this isn't real hardship at all for those of us with a decent income. I'm struggling to swallow that we all now have access to less, and everything costs more, and is harder to get - and if you dare to complain or suggest it's the fault of Brexit, people tell you to stop moaning and eat your turnips, like Baldrick. Eating local is one thing. Watching the rest of the world trade and enjoy each other's goods freely while we boil our turnips...? I don't remember that being on the side of any buses.
 
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Safranfoer

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Its not really as bad as that for you is it?

Most of that tirade is untrue, get a grip woman 😲
You're underestimating my resistance to starchy root vegetables. But I'm also kinda resistant to being told that the downsides to Brexit are imagined or untrue, to be fair. Fresh food is no longer as fresh as it was. I'm having to change what I eat and how I shop in direct response to that. The seasonal alternatives are... very Blackadder.

No, it's not that bad. Obviously. But death by a thousand cuts and all that. Dozens of tiny deteriorations and inconveniences, additional complexity, finding workarounds, giving my son tinned fruit instead, plodding on - no great sense of we're all in this together to defeat the enemy, and save the world, no clearly articulated direction or purpose to what we're doing at all, we're just heads down and getting on while the fruit and flowers rot in the fields and the pigs pile up in farms with no one to slaughter them... I'm just a bit fed up of it all today.
 

tenet

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Shopped in Tesco today - no shortages as far as we could tell AND joy of joy their petrol station had fuel and NO queues. Perhaps the good folk of Stroud have a modicum of sense.
 

midgydug

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Better growing your own if you can. We all think we are being healthy eating our supermarket veggies 12 months of the year. We have 3 large farms near us that employed a couple of thousand eastern european workers, none of the ones I knew would eat any of the stuff they grew as they saw the chemicals that went into the constant growing of their fruit & vedge !!!
 

Andrew B

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Ha! 80 miles til empty. And I'm sitting looking at a queue of traffic outside my house that I suspect is linked to whichever numpty posted on the local forum that the tanker was filling up the Sainsbury's petrol station.

People only panic in times of crisis. Quit with the crises, people will stop panicking. And to be clear, I don't blame Brexit, and certainly not for the driver shortage. But the government's handling of Brexit...? Be nice when I can buy milk with a longer shelf life than tomorrow. That's my baseline expectation for a sunlit upland. It has TEA.
It’s awful having to see care workers ect in tears over this. It’s so easy to get on the same panic trip if you’re not careful though? I’ve found myself asking my family about bloody gas stations and their response is all so calm in the hope it will blow over.
I’ve never been super patriotic and perhaps it’s a good job with England football team lol. And so when the Brexit thing first was mentioned I never had any good feelings about it, albeit I had no strong feelings either way? Other than what you just mentioned about how it would ever get handled as two Prime Ministers bit the dust over it.
No conspiracy theories, just my thoughts but after Boris met Biden the other day and with Boris coming away with no trade deals ect? When asked I thought Biden said a very telling thing, albeit it didn’t surprise me?

Don’t remember exact words but he said something like “My and America’s allegiance is to the United Nations”.
A simple search on the UN home page does point to a set of goals for 2030 on a global scale.
With so much panic about and so much uproar in various countries it did occur to me that the Anglo/American power which has existed for time, could be all but over.
 

Andrew B

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There's the ongoing pandemic, disruption to food supply chains, disruption to our kids' educations, the removal of universal credit, energy companies going under and gas prices rising astronomically. An imaginary shortage of petrol in and of itself is no cause for panic. In the context of everything else - many people are on high alert, and the government has lost authority when it says, 'There is no problem with xxxx' because there's been at least a billion recent examples where it turns out there WAS and they've had to u-turn, fast.

And yes, panic is, fuelled by the media - and that includes everyone posting photos of the 'crisis' on social media. We're all the media now, it's not just MSM.

The queue of traffic is still outside my house. I really, really hope it's not for petrol.
BOOM!!
 

Safranfoer

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It’s awful having to see care workers ect in tears over this. It’s so easy to get on the same panic trip if you’re not careful though? I’ve found myself asking my family about bloody gas stations and their response is all so calm in the hope it will blow over.
I’ve never been super patriotic and perhaps it’s a good job with England football team lol. And so when the Brexit thing first was mentioned I never had any good feelings about it, albeit I had no strong feelings either way? Other than what you just mentioned about how it would ever get handled as two Prime Ministers bit the dust over it.
No conspiracy theories, just my thoughts but after Boris met Biden the other day and with Boris coming away with no trade deals ect? When asked I thought Biden said a very telling thing, albeit it didn’t surprise me?

Don’t remember exact words but he said something like “My and America’s allegiance is to the United Nations”.
A simple search on the UN home page does point to a set of goals for 2030 on a global scale.
With so much panic about and so much uproar in various countries it did occur to me that the Anglo/American power which has existed for time, could be all but over.
Much of my work at the moment is around either communicating how my clients are progressing against the UN's Sustainable Development Goals for 2030 (regularly reporting on it is a key metric), or making sure my business is fit to supply others in line with them as most of my work is issued by procurement departments rather than direct from marketing, and the benchmarks to even be considered for a contract are getting higher and higher - bearing in mind I'm a sub-20 employee SME. The UK government signed up to them in 2015, they're driving the environmental agenda and social sustainability will follow shortly after and in a HUGE rush as governments and businesses realise they've burned all their time on the Planet pillar and none on the People. This idea that we will be free to make our own decisions outside of the EU is fine on one level, but ignores the commitments we have made at a much more elevated level. It's the SDGs that are driving net zero carbon emissions by 2050, they include targets for levelling up and tackling inequality, and diversity and inclusivity... Those that voted Leave for control reasons are gonna hate it, anyone that rejects climate change or social justice will hate it even more... Maybe we'll opt out of the UN.
 
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Birkin

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Much of my work at the moment is around either communicating how my clients are progressing against the UN's Sustainable Development Goals for 2030 (regularly reporting on it is a key metric), or making sure my business is fit to supply others in line with them as most of my work is issued by procurement departments rather than direct from marketing, and the benchmarks to even be considered for a contract are getting higher and higher - bearing in mind I'm a sub-20 employee SME. The UK government signed up to them in 2015, they're driving the environmental agenda and social sustainability will follow shortly after and in a HUGE rush as governments and businesses realise they've burned all their time on the Planet pillar and none on the People. This idea that we will be free to make our own decisions outside of the EU is fine on one level, but ignores the commitments we have made at a much more elevated level. It's the SDGs that are driving net zero carbon emissions by 2050, they include targets for levelling up and tackling inequality, and diversity and inclusivity... Those that voted Leave for control reasons are gonna hate it, anyone that rejects climate change or social justice will hate it even more... Maybe we'll opt out of the UN.
I thought that was Macrons next move after he took his ball home after losing the sub contract. Problem with SDG's is that the main players are not playing the game.
 

Safranfoer

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I thought that was Macrons next move after he took his ball home after losing the sub contract. Problem with SDG's is that the main players are not playing the game.
There's a lot of creative reporting - which in a way makes it worse. All the disruption and effort and energy burned, none of the actual results.
 

Birkin

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I was thinking about the possibility of no turkeys at Christmas and thought about the farmer driving round in his £125k Range Rover and parks it outside his £3m home complaining that he may have to kill his turkeys because he can’t get them packed due to a shortage of labour due to Brexit.
Bo**ocks.
Shortage of cheap labour is why he has no packers.
Starmer may get his £10 per hour minimum wage yet.
 

carbisdale caster

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I passed a few petrol stations here in the far north today and not a single queue in sight, or any evidence of shortages. Thankfully it seems we're clearly a bit smarter than the crackpots down south that are so eagerly losing the plot at the moment :)
 

Pollowick

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I passed a few petrol stations here in the far north today and not a single queue in sight, or any evidence of shortages. Thankfully it seems we're clearly a bit smarter than the crackpots down south that are so eagerly losing the plot at the moment :)


Likewise. I drove through Oldham, Middleton and several more suburbs of Mancheter twice yesterday and noticed just one petrol station closed. The rest had no queues, just maybe 4 or 5 cars waiting which is, to me, quite normal. I did note that prices are typically 5-10p dearer than last Friday when I was in the same area - I filled up then as I had just completed a 200+ mile journey and was planning a further one.
 

Safranfoer

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My favourite part is that motorway service stations have not and will not run out of fuel. People may be gullible, easily panicked and easily led - but they're not stupid...
 

budge

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I suspect population size vs fuel stations in the area is probably the main reason why some fuel stations are running dry and others not .....
Most definitely, probably not helped by all the cars taking little Britney and Stormzy to and from school. Our 2 nearest filling stations both ran dry over the weekend but moving away from town centres there was still fuel available. Things seem to be easing now but prices have increased noticeably.

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Rrrr

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My favourite part is that motorway service stations have not and will not run out of fuel. People may be gullible, easily panicked and easily led - but they're not stupid...
Aye, i quite like a packet of fruit pastels or rolos from the garage when getting fuel. Only a crazy person would buy those from the motorway services

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Safranfoer

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Someone posted on our local forum today asking whether anywhere within 6 miles has fuel because that's how much she has left and the two fuel stations in our town are both dry still, and she's rang both and they don't know when they're getting a delivery.

Derbyshire is still panicking, then.
 

Safranfoer

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Aye, i quite like a packet of fruit pastels or rolos from the garage when getting fuel. Only a crazy person would buy those from the motorway services

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It's a Twirl for me. Only time I ever buy or eat chocolate, now I think. I would pay motorway prices for a Twirl - but as I'd never dream of filling up at one, will never have to.
 
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