English Anglers Urged to Report Pink Salmon Catches

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The Environment Agency is urging anglers to report unusual catches after several pink salmon sightings in North East waters.

Last week a non-native pink salmon was caught in the River Tyne at Wylam and around 100 are believed to have been caught in waters off the North East and Yorkshire coast in recent months. Further afield, anglers have confirmed catches in a number of rivers in Scotland and in western Ireland.

Environment Agency is collecting vital data about sightings so officers can monitor the situation to determine any impact on the local environment and species. Data collected will help the Environment Agency, fisheries researchers and other organisations with an interest in fisheries management in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Scandinavia, better understand how to manage the arrival of pink salmon in the UK .

Jonathan Shelley from the Environment Agency said: “It is quite unusual to find pink salmon in our waters and we’re keen anglers know we’re aware of the sightings and we’re investigating.

“I’d urge anglers to contact us if they see any non-native salmon in the waters, with a date, location and if possible a photograph, which would really help us identify them and build up a picture of where they are.”

“We are monitoring the situation and early indications is that there is no major impact on wild fish stocks at this point in time.”

Anglers holding a salmon licence who catch pink salmon are asked not to return the fish to the water. Instead they are asked to dispatch them humanely and, if possible, make the fish available to the Environment Agency for inspection and further analysis. If this is not possible, they are asked to send a sample of the scales. Trout and coarse anglers are asked to call the Environment Agency on 0800 80 70 60, if unsuccessful please return the salmon.

Pink salmon (Onchorhyncus gorbuscha), also known as humpback salmon, originate from the northern Pacific Ocean.

Millions were stocked in the White Sea region of north Russia from the 1950’s until 2003 to develop a net fishery. As a result, some have established self-sustaining populations in rivers in Russia, Finland and northern Norway. This is the most likely origin of the pink salmon recently caught in the UK and Ireland.

Anyone with information is asked to contact the North East environmental monitoring team on 0800 807060 or email jonathan.shelley@environment-agency.gov.uk.


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Strathglass

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Anglers holding a salmon licence who catch pink salmon are asked not to return the fish to the water. Instead they are asked to dispatch them humanely and, if possible, make the fish available to the Environment Agency for inspection and further analysis. If this is not possible, they are asked to send a sample of the scales.

Trout and coarse anglers are asked to call the Environment Agency on 0800 80 70 60, if unsuccessful please return the salmon.

Really??

Strange advice...IMO.
 

Sewinboy

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Why would it be strange to return any pink salmon? Should you catch a mink, it is an offence to release it.
 

Taddy

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Are these pacific fish that have been running our waters for the past 37 yrs i know of a evolutionary thing or man made,the E/A also advise to kill zander and wels catfish,but the zander is now well into the eco system and maybe the wells catfish on say the trent? now i dont see any one killing carp or barbel andywhere further north of the yorkshire rivers with ragards to barbel,so if we have people nice people who wouldnt harm a fly do we think for one minute they will kill that fish? i reckon not,i first seen these on the Wear in the very early 80s seen two caught in one night then none again for yrs,if they arrive well so be it we will never ever stop it thats a fact use zander if yer want as a example,i dont hear the E/A OR WHO EVER winging about heavy metal in the sediments in our etuaries or pollution in some fo the main rivers in the uk,so pacific salmon have found their way to the uk - so what,what ever happens happens,cos at the end of the day the environment has been kicked up side down now for what 200 yrs

All our good intentions mean nothing to what is coming to the uk with regards to fish migration,we get new species all the time,so what the E/A are saying is kill every new species that arrives? wow jeez help me......................
 

noeyedeer

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Really??

Strange advice...IMO.

Clearly their reasoning is that any advice for trout licensees to dispatch non-native migratories in U.K. Rivers is a licence for trout fishers to fish for salmon and kill them. (Err, I thought it was a pink officer)
 
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Loxie

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Can the act of releasing a pink back into the river be deemed an unlawful introduction of a non native species ?

It's a very interesting point. In England and Wales the EA legislate that non native rainbow trout can only be taken in the brown trout season in rivers. The defence that introduction of fish without the consent of the regulatory authority is illegal under section 30 of the salmon and freshwater fisheries act has been dismissed, therefore it seems that the EA can enforce CCR on non native fish if it wishes to. The reason given for both is to take away the excuse that an angler fishing for one species is really fishing for another and is entirely specious. You can, after all, fish in winter for grayling.
 
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