Earn 2020

kreid

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Not too well Bob. Not that long ago we had a European class river , grayling wise, with a good head of fish and a healthy number of bigger fish with some over 2 lbs. I have not had a single 2 pounder in 2020. We have noted fish with stab wounds. Today i fished the coup to templemill and only caught a3 small grayling (and i mean small) after about 3.30.The conditions were not great, very bright with a blustery wind that made presentation more challenging. Last few weeks the fish have been hard to find with several day ticket holders and season ticket holders blanking. So.....why the lack of fish? I can only think they have been cleaned out by the black death - we saw at least 3 today on the river. I believe that grayling are also more susceptical, as they are slower than trout for example and can shoal up making them a juicy target. I will pm you other info. K.
 

goosander

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Find it hard to believe that the river I fish now is the same place I first fished over 40 years ago. Spring fishing with a large brass tube fly I had a fish which put up a great fight. Thought it must be a springer. On seeing it I discovered it was a massive grayling. Had it been a springer it would have been in the 5-7 lbs. range. It was black as if getting ready for spawning. Swam a way ok. Had other ones but none that size. A few years later I asked "old Andy" the keeper what type of duck that was with the tip of its beak pointing down. Reply goosander, first I had ever seen. Now they are everywhere. Have noticed the last few years that even the what were common birds are now getting rare. Oyster catchers that nested on every bit of gravel are now only seen. The fish swallows [terns], redshank/ringed plover/pewit/harriers/owls and others not seen for several years. Even the mallard which used to be a pest in the spring with the duck flapping across the water with the old broken wing trick is now rare.
Bob.
 

kreid

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that will jilldy up the river a bit now, way up and over its banks and into awe the parks at Dunning!
 

Andrew B

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Find it hard to believe that the river I fish now is the same place I first fished over 40 years ago. Spring fishing with a large brass tube fly I had a fish which put up a great fight. Thought it must be a springer. On seeing it I discovered it was a massive grayling. Had it been a springer it would have been in the 5-7 lbs. range. It was black as if getting ready for spawning. Swam a way ok. Had other ones but none that size. A few years later I asked "old Andy" the keeper what type of duck that was with the tip of its beak pointing down. Reply goosander, first I had ever seen. Now they are everywhere. Have noticed the last few years that even the what were common birds are now getting rare. Oyster catchers that nested on every bit of gravel are now only seen. The fish swallows [terns], redshank/ringed plover/pewit/harriers/owls and others not seen for several years. Even the mallard which used to be a pest in the spring with the duck flapping across the water with the old broken wing trick is now rare.
Bob.
Yes I hear you. I’ve always taken an interest in bird life ect, probably from being taken on walks as a kid and trying to make the walks more interesting? So as 45yr old I can definitely say that I’ve noticed the very same things.
To see a Goosander back then was something you would remember and they certainly weren’t considered as common river birds in Britain back then. Same goes for Cormorants that now have huge roosting sites inland near rivers and lakes and dare I say it? Seals certainly weren’t seen in such plentiful numbers or maybe it was that the commercial nets did a job of culling them to keep the numbers down(how ironic).
Swifts could be heard screeching overhead with swallows and martins in their hundreds at any given time in the summer as one looked up and perhaps even more worrying is how our windscreens are no longer covered in dead flies. And that’s before we get started on the riverbank.

I have good memories of the Earn as being the place that stoked the idea of fishing for salmon as a young kid on Holiday in Crieff. Funny enough I think it was seeing anglers on the Earn that got Ian beefy Botham into salmon fishing.
 

keirstream

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I have good memories of the Earn as being the place that stoked the idea of fishing for salmon as a young kid on Holiday in Crieff. Funny enough I think it was seeing anglers on the Earn that got Ian beefy Botham into salmon fishing.
No
it was the Teith at Callander.
I've fished with him on a couple of occasions.
 

Andrew B

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No
it was the Teith at Callander.
I've fished with him on a couple of occasions.
Lol no way how nice. I knew I’d read about him seeing salmon anglers in Scotland.
I met him once in a que for the Burger/coffee van at Headingly and briefly spoke about the fishing. Proper genuine guy.
 
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