Do you let it swing?

Woody565

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Hi all,

Only my second season salmon fishing and was wondering how the worm should be fished.

I have been casting directly opposite my position and closing the bail arm straight away and feeling the bail controller bounce along the bottom as it swings round in an arc back to downstream of my own bank.

Should I be letting it swing across the river or should it be allowed to go directly downstream by giving it line?

Thanks for any help

Dan


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Slaneysider

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Take the bail alarm off and using your index finger trap the line between it and the rod handle or cork , then , when you get a take release your finger and let the fish take line if you want it to swallow the worms , if your practicing catch and release you should probably strike straight away because if you don't the worms will be swallowed and you won't have be able to retrieve the hook with out harming the fish
 

ddave07

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Hi all,

Only my second season salmon fishing and was wondering how the worm should be fished.

I have been casting directly opposite my position and closing the bail arm straight away and feeling the bail controller bounce along the bottom as it swings round in an arc back to downstream of my own bank.

Should I be letting it swing across the river or should it be allowed to go directly downstream by giving it line?

Thanks for any help

Dan


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I fish the same way as you describe and found it highly successful. Had a 20lb Salmon 2 years ago doing that and also managed plenty of Sea Trout too!
 

Woody565

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Thanks very much for replies lads. Still yet to land a salmon so hoping to put the hours in the season and get the first one


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ddave07

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Thanks very much for replies lads. Still yet to land a salmon so hoping to put the hours in the season and get the first one


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I found I had no confidence in a tactic until I caught on it. I have good confidence using a worm, because I know it’ll catch...using an Abu Toby on the other hand, never caught a fish with it, let alone a salmon. Never seen anyone catch on one...I hear the stories, but I’m yet to believe in that one!

DD
 

Jerry

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Dan, I use two tactics for the worm. Letting it swing round or using a float and walking it down in a straight line. The float seems to work better for me when covering known lies or when fishing along a bank where the fish run. It’s surprising how many rivers and beats in the UK allow the float but you’re best asking first. Standard in Ireland.
When swinging it round I use a baitrunner reel and have it set quite light, just above the power of the current to take line. Cast out, close bail arm and flick the baitrunner on. I hold a loose bit of line between my fingers and there’s normally no mistaking a take as you feel the head shaking. I then release the line and when a couple of feet of line leave the reel when it runs, wind down and hold on! As already mentioned, if it’s left till the fish starts running the hook will most likely be swallowed so you need to time when to strike with the time of year and chances of fresh fish vs stale ones. If it’s later in the year, or doing C&R, strike during the initial head shakes. This can be a lottery hooking wise and sounds stupid saying it, but your feeling what has already happened by the time it’s travelled up the line so don’t be surprised when missing them on the strike. You have to get them mid head shake. I prefer the baitrunner approach but have also had success with the open bale arm and holding the line. You’ll find a system that works for you. Good luck and it won’t be long till you start getting them. Some frown on the worm but it takes more skill than other methods!
 

Rennie

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I'm not a worm fisher for Salmon afraid.However what I will add to the info so far is, don't tie your self down to one method of fishing the worm.Try and build a library of skills so you have more than one string to your bow.
Trotting the worm down and across is a very good start, but learn how to fish the worm parallel to you, thats hard, learn how to target specific lays and never never ignore a float(if allowed).
I once watched a French guy at Grantown on Spey fish the worm on his flee rod with a pice of wool as an indicator fishing fast shallow water, he caught loads of Quality Sea Trout during the daytime when we flee fishers went blank!.
There's more than one way of skinning the proverbial cat, but it will take some mastering I can tell you!.
Worm fishing can be an art rather than just splodge it in and wait, thats if you want it to be of course!.
Good luck,Pedro.
 

wetwader

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I was worm fishing the first years for salmons and seatrout, back in the early 80s.
One year balancing between worm and fly. But more in the question, digging for worms with all Moskitos in Norway or mastering the flyrods of those days. Sometimes I think, I miss something. Not the worms and not the effectiveness, but the technique for itself.

As already mentioned by Rennie, using a float can be very effective. And fun too...

I refined the technique of fishing a small float with adjustable depth and small amounts of lead on a long match rod and low diameter lines. A technique that we used a lot in our youth and over many years in fishing for grayling in our big home rivers.
It can also be fished with nymph flies or other artificial flies!
We caught seatrouts very successfull in daylight, when flyfishing has to be done in the night. I am convinced, the effect was done by presenting exactly in the right depth, that needed to be adapted for each cast to find out what’s needed.
And also by being enabled with the visible float to cover all water precisely, systematic - and with control. Something that is not that controllable by using heavy lead, down on the ground and let it swing around.

As already mentioned, I don’t miss it because of it’s effectiveness. It’s a technique that could be misused too from a view of fish ethic of nowadays.
But the technique for itself is interesting and not without challenges. There were fishermen being more successfull and some less.
If done right, it gives a very good understanding of different water depths, preferred lies of fish over the day and their behavior in general.
I would never doubt, if forced to go back, which method to choose, because it’s much more refined and enjoyable than heavy rod, heavy lead out and around ...

What should also be said. From others and my experience, using this method, the fishes don’t have the hook far down if reacting right -at once- after the float is going down. A benefit compared to the heavy equipment of the down to the ground method.
But the downside should be mentioned too. Because of the need of low diameter lines it should not be used for the heaviest of salmon fishing.
I would see seatrouts and Grilse fishing up to salmons of 10 Kilo as the main approach.
 

Walleye

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Interesting discussion. I always fish the worm upstream so I was happy to learn it can be fished downstream as described.
I stand well below the lies and cast well above the lies with my worm with enough weight on it to bounce along the bottom down towards me. I reel in as it comes toward me, with rod tip high, just to control the excess line. I'm not in the river so by the time the worm gets to me it is directly opposite me in the river and that's when I reel in for next cast.
I find it has to bounce along the bottom so this method can be quite snaggy.
I use a running weight so when a fish takes it doesn't feel the weight.
Also, when the fish takes, the line is already downstream of it so I think this makes it much harder for the fish to swallow the hook as there is always some resistance to it just swallowing the bait. I've left it for as much as 30seconds before, unsure whether it is a fish or not, then lifted and found it hooked in the scissors. Most are hooked in the scissors and I'm sure it's because I fish upstream like this.
Saying that, deep hooking isn't the reason why I fish upstream, it's just what I was taught by an old guy many years ago so it's all I know. I'm sure Falkus also describes the upstream worm method.
 

Royser89

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Always let it swing its when it is swinging you tend to get the best takes for me anyway. You sound to be fishing correctly just wait for the take and also after the swing leave it rest a minute or so you could be in for a suprise

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Timxyz49

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Does it matter how fast the worm is bouncing along the bottom?
Or is it a case of as long as it’s on the bottom and bouncing it doesn’t matter.

Obviously in a decent flow with a light weight it might not touch the bottom at all but when I adjust the weight and feel it bouncing I wonder if it’s goin too fast

I’ve tried worming a few times but then due to lack of confidence in whether I’m doing it right always go back to spinning although I’m sure I’d get more fish on the worm

Any help would be great ?
 

Timxyz49

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What size weight do you use then?
I’ve got those plastic tubes with interchangeable weight that goes in the bottom
I “think” I’ve just about got the right speed then
Do you cast square across and let it swing back towards the bank in an arc
Or do you cast upstream then let it come across in front of you and wind in the slack
I’ve been trying both badly
Thanks for your advice ?
 

Saint Andrews

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I dont fish worm much these days but have a lot in tbe past and used to love it, a very skillful method to master correctly. IMO follow Jerry and Rennies advice and you wont go too wrong. Remember Salar can soon swallow a worm (i wonder why they do worm but not prawn?) so if fishing C&R hit them soon. Wait for first tap then when salar starts to pull hit him on 2nd or 3rd pull max. If he just taps at it hit him whilst 'in tap' 3rd or 4th continual tap. Youll miss some but will avoid deep hooking in most cases. If you do deep hook cut the line close to hook as poss without causing bleeding. Dont force forceps down their throats to remove, youll do more damage than good IMO. Iv caught the same fish a couple of times in the past after releasing with a cut line so they can survive. In these days of C&R i dont know why some clubs/river boards dont allow prawn fishing, never deep hook there and a very skilled method to execute correctly..
 
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ddave07

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What size weight do you use then?
I’ve got those plastic tubes with interchangeable weight that goes in the bottom
I “think” I’ve just about got the right speed then
Do you cast square across and let it swing back towards the bank in an arc
Or do you cast upstream then let it come across in front of you and wind in the slack
I’ve been trying both badly
Thanks for your advice ?

The weight varies according to the pool I'm fishing, the interchangable weights are brilliant for this. I usually cast ever so slight upstream and then let it come back towards the bank in an arc; keeping my finger on the line feeling for any taps etc...

I had no faith doing this method, until I caught a 20lb Salmon! Caught Salmon, ST and some really good sized brownies on this method too!
 

Clydebuilt

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When worming, I used to use plasticine to easily add or subtract weight from pool to pool or run to run.
It was cheap as chips and worked very well.
Brilliant for squeezing onto braid or onto a diy running weight (I used to make a simple corkscrew type affair from copper wire, stopped the weed pulling the plasticine off)
You could adjust it quickly & was brilliant for uptreaming the worm or setting a float when using prawn or shrimp too.
I just wonder how environmently friendly it was....
Not practised worming or shrimping for a long time but used to enjoy it
 
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