Daft question about backing?

chriswjx

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So I've seen folk discussing reel capacities, between reels or mono v dacron. But whats confused me about it is, how do you all know how much backing you've put on? 😅

See people saying "oh I can 130m or 160m" but for me as a beginner, I can tell you if I use up a fresh spool of 100m of backing how much I've put on, but I'd struggle to even give you more than a rough guess (more than 100m but less than 200m) if I was filling a reel from a larger (300m+) or partially used spool of backing?

Cheers
Chris
 

Lewis.Chessman

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Hi, Chris. One method is to put the fly line on the spool first, then attach the backing and fill to capacity.
If you have an identical spare spool for the reel you can attach the backing to that, swap the spools, put the 'backfilled' spool on a spindle* and then reel the lot onto 'spool b'. Job done.

If no spare spool, you might go outside and strip the lot off onto the grass, then return to the backing and attach it to your spool to load it perfectly. A small child is a useful accessory when running the line out. Saves you a lot of walking. ;)

* Since you say you are a beginner it might be worth adding that fly lines should be loaded by placing them on a spindle so the the line does not twist when it's loaded (as happens if you reel it onto the spool over the edge of the line's packaging). Each twist imparted will cause a coil when you fish with it, effectively ruining your line and your fun.
Hope that's clear?
 

chriswjx

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Cheers, aye I've gotten a dab hand at just guessing the right amounts of backing for my trout reels. The reverse spooling technique was a godsend when I was filling my old youngs 1535s and 1540s though... my question's more how do folk seem to be able to say, oh I've put on X yards of backing onto that reel? I don't see how I could put even an estimate on the yardage unless I just put a whole spool of backing (of known length) on it...

(Seeing threads in the Reels section where folk compare the amount of different kinds of backing they can fit onto the same reel)
 

MCXFisher

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These great big spools of backing are a nuisance in that regard. Life used to be simpler when backing came in linked spools of 100 metres.

If in doubt, I lay it out on the lawn and pace out the length of the backing (to and fro, umpteen times). It's not precise but it does protect you against gross error: the other day I discovered by this means that I'd put 30% less backing onto a reel than I'd originally thought. It's boring and time consuming, but there again, you don't do it often!
 

Greegs

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I always reverse spool onto my reels.

I couldn’t tell you how many metres I’ve got on but I do know it’s filled to capacity & I couldn’t get any more on.


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Rennie

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I tend to look at the reels specs. in the 1st instance see what it should take.Then I use the reverse it all on the spool 1st then re- wind it at the local park technique!. As long as your reel is correctly filled with sensible backing, it won't matter if its a genuine 150m or a bit more or a bit less.
What does matter is the wrong choice of reel (size wise) or the wrong choice of backing so maybe you haven't the right amount of the right stuff on in the 1st place!.
For most UK fishing with 9/10 or 10/11 lines on your typical std. outfits of 14ft or 15ft rods 150m of 30lb Dacron is perfectly adequate.If you are a regular on the Tay/Tweed/Spey then for safety's sake 200m.Small spate rivers with switch rods or smaller 12ft 8 rated rods and 100m should see the job done.
The main task is buying the right reel in the 1st place and it's always better to go on the side of cation!, a bit more is better than a bit less.
When you've done a few reels you get the hang of it all any way.
What I recommend you do try is, when you're all sorted and your reels filled, tie it off to a goal/rugby post at the park and run the lot off in a straight line and see what it looks like- der!, do it when its quiet perhaps!-lol,150m and a head/running line or full 40yd line, it's a long way I can tell you.
Another thing is I avoid knots if I at all can between my backing and running lines, or indeed between separate spools of backing.Several spools of short lengths to make one long length in my books aren't a great idea when it comes to backing.I use 30lb hollow braid for all my splices with water proof superglue, whipping thread and Aqua Sure. No knots at all and a smooth failsafe passage when you do hook a good/energetic fish!.I also tape the Dacron backing onto the reels spool when I first fit it.This will stop the whole lot simply rotating on the spool-some reel finishes are prone to this! and it's not a good idea.
Good luck, Pedro.
 

Rrrr

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Mine all just get 150m. Its rare you will ever see it and if a fish has 100 yards of your backing out its long gone anyway i rekon.

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richard

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I use a Shakespeare line counter, gives you a readout. I think originally for boat sea fishers to plumb and measure depth. :cool:
Richard
 

Gosling

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I tie to a fence and walk to a 100m marker. Then attach to reel and reel in. Don't unspool on floor as backing can tangle 🤔
 

leave_u

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Hi, Chris. One method is to put the fly line on the spool first, then attach the backing and fill to capacity.
If you have an identical spare spool for the reel you can attach the backing to that, swap the spools, put the 'backfilled' spool on a spindle* and then reel the lot onto 'spool b'. Job done.

If no spare spool, you might go outside and strip the lot off onto the grass, then return to the backing and attach it to your spool to load it perfectly. A small child is a useful accessory when running the line out. Saves you a lot of walking. ;)

* Since you say you are a beginner it might be worth adding that fly lines should be loaded by placing them on a spindle so the the line does not twist when it's loaded (as happens if you reel it onto the spool over the edge of the line's packaging). Each twist imparted will cause a coil when you fish with it, effectively ruining your line and your fun.
Hope that's clear?
Very good advice. Some lines coil if spending a long time wrapped tight on a spool. If the line has memory and a lot of kinks or coils, you can put it in warm water at 65C, you need to control the temperature with a Thermometer of some sort. After leaving it in for about 5min, take it out and stretch it properly, lube it with some surface agent, (i use the nanogel from Vision) and the line is like new. Don't boil it or mess with the temperature, but if proper done it lets you make your shooting heads or lines as new. For backing i allway use a line counter, costs about 10 euros and are fairly accurate.
 

Red Spinner

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So I've seen folk discussing reel capacities, between reels or mono v dacron. But whats confused me about it is, how do you all know how much backing you've put on? 😅

See people saying "oh I can 130m or 160m" but for me as a beginner, I can tell you if I use up a fresh spool of 100m of backing how much I've put on, but I'd struggle to even give you more than a rough guess (more than 100m but less than 200m) if I was filling a reel from a larger (300m+) or partially used spool of backing?

Cheers
Chris

For me and the metres I quoted, the line I used is colour marked.
The line has;
1) different colour change every 10metres
2) a white 1/2m section with a black line in the middle every 5m
3) a white 10cm section every metre.
The manufacturers also supply a stick-on lable so you know where you are on the line - see below.

The line is designed for vertical jigging where the angler drops a metal jig to the precise depths the target species are holding.
I didnt buy the line specifically for use as backing, it was some I had spare and because it doesn't rot or deteriorate it will last almost indefinitely.
Hope this answer your questions relating to my posts.
image.jpg
 

ibm59

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Hi, Chris. One method is to put the fly line on the spool first, then attach the backing and fill to capacity.
If you have an identical spare spool for the reel you can attach the backing to that, swap the spools, put the 'backfilled' spool on a spindle* and then reel the lot onto 'spool b'. Job done.

If no spare spool, you might go outside and strip the lot off onto the grass, then return to the backing and attach it to your spool to load it perfectly. A small child is a useful accessory when running the line out. Saves you a lot of walking. ;)

* Since you say you are a beginner it might be worth adding that fly lines should be loaded by placing them on a spindle so the the line does not twist when it's loaded (as happens if you reel it onto the spool over the edge of the line's packaging). Each twist imparted will cause a coil when you fish with it, effectively ruining your line and your fun.
Hope that's clear?
Buy a line winder. 😉
 
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