Curry's Red Shrimp

easky

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That McGall man with no veilings at all!!! Tut, tut!!! :lol:

From what I'm reading in various books and online, there doesn't seem to be much evidence that Pat ever tied any of his red shrimps with Indian Crow as is detailed in some of the older descriptions of the pattern. Many believe he would have used dyed feathers from the white ring of a cock pheasant. Now, was he using these when he was tying the veilings at the sides of the hook rather than above and below?

It would seem that red swan, or something similar was used, in the photo above. But then again, these are above and below. All rather confusing but interesting none the less. :)

Many thanks for sharing the photo by the way! :thumb:

that's the 'modern tying' Jockie :D and was having problems uploading the individual pix, but eventually got there lol

Couple of other interesting things - the front hackle was longer as was the traditional style and the JC is roofed, rather than eyes
 
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Jockiescott

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that's the 'modern tying' Jockie :D and was having problems uploading the individual pix, but eventually got there lol

Couple of other interesting things - the front hackle was longer as was the traditional style and the JC is roofed, rather than eyes

I read that the JC was roofed but wondered if that was more for the original patterns with the veilings tied at the sides to allow them to be seen?

I lay my JC almost flat on these to allow the top veiling at the front to be seen. If that makes sense?

I do like my hackles longer at the front which is very easy done with these. I just use the one feather for both hackles! :D

Wind on the middle hackle, secure it and cut it off, set the cut piece to one side and use it for the front again. It is going to be longer. To be honest, I'm not sure if I do this to be traditional or if I'm just miserable!!! :lol:
 

easky

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I read that the JC was roofed but wondered if that was more for the original patterns with the veilings tied at the sides to allow them to be seen?

that's a very good point - tying them roofed would create a more 3D effect.. interesting!

I lay my JC almost flat on these to allow the top veiling at the front to be seen. If that makes sense?

And yep makes total sense!

I do like my hackles longer at the front which is very easy done with these. I just use the one feather for both hackles! :D

Wind on the middle hackle, secure it and cut it off, set the cut piece to one side and use it for the front again. It is going to be longer. To be honest, I'm not sure if I do this to be traditional or if I'm just miserable!!! :lol:

that's a good point - I wonder if originally it was a 'form over function' thing, and as you say if you use the same feather the front hackle will by definition/naturally be longer.

I personally prefer the more 'modern' Gillespie style with a shorter front hackle (more function over form) - this happened by accident with Robert if memory serves me right but he then preferred it that way, with the rationale being that the shorter front hackle allowed each of the 3 hackles to move independently of each other... assuming you use a 2/3 1/3 body split.. if that makes sense :D
 
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Jockiescott

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that's a good point - I wonder if originally it was a 'form over function' thing, and as you say if you use the same feather the front hackle will by definition/naturally be longer.

I personally prefer the more 'modern' Gillespie style with a shorter front hackle (more function over form) - this happened by accident with Robert if memory serves me right but he then preferred it that way, with the rationale being that the shorter front hackle allowed each of the 3 hackles to move independently of each other... assuming you use a 2/3 1/3 body split.. if that makes sense :D

I'm almost sure I read about that on the forum somewhere. It happened on the Roe with a Faughan Shrimp if memory serves me right?

I grew up reading "Along the Faughan Side" which stated, for every shrimp pattern mentioned in it, that the front hackle should always be longer than the middle hackle. I've just always tied like that since. :)
 

gwelsher

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Really interesting thread.
So veilings top and bottom or on the sides?
Made of what?
Body proportions?
Length of hackle?
No mention of bling from Easky!!!

:confused: :help: :batty:
 

Jockiescott

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Really interesting thread.
So veilings top and bottom or on the sides?
Made of what?
Body proportions?
Length of hackle?
No mention of bling from Easky!!!

:confused: :help: :batty:

Hopefully things will become clearer if and when I get round to getting the blog post done! :)
 

Jockiescott

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I did another couple of versions today.

The first one I did was with veilings of hackle points tied at the sides of the hook.

DSC_0396.JPG

I'm still not 100% sure why you would want them at the sides but perhaps they make a slightly different profle? Perhaps the broad hackle points move more in the water and make the hackle fibres move more? I really am not sure and I also think that something a bit more dense is needed than hackle points.

Here is the finished fly anyway...

DSC_0403.JPG

I then did one with strips of red swan

DSC_0415.JPG

This is what I would use myself for these flies. I think it gives a more solid red through the hackles

DSC_0418.JPG
 

gwelsher

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It's difficult to get the balance right to my eyes.
Hackle tips are too wispy and swan too thick.
Maybe a Hen hackle tip?
 

Jockiescott

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It's difficult to get the balance right to my eyes.
Hackle tips are too wispy and swan too thick.
Maybe a Hen hackle tip?

Could maybe double up the tips to bilk them out a bit but I do prefer Swan myself. :)
 

billy fish

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I did another couple of versions today.

The first one I did was with veilings of hackle points tied at the sides of the hook.

View attachment 44182

I'm still not 100% sure why you would want them at the sides but perhaps they make a slightly different profle? Perhaps the broad hackle points move more in the water and make the hackle fibres move more? I really am not sure and I also think that something a bit more dense is needed than hackle points.

Here is the finished fly anyway...

View attachment 44183

I then did one with strips of red swan

View attachment 44184

This is what I would use myself for these flies. I think it gives a more solid red through the hackles

View attachment 44185

Beauty , I think the veiling’s definitely add something to the look but visually ,to the human eye , I think best above and below. I don’t think that the salmon will mind either way .
 

Jockiescott

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Beauty , I think the veiling’s definitely add something to the look but visually ,to the human eye , I think best above and below. I don’t think that the salmon will mind either way .

I really only did a version with veilings at the sides to show how different it looks. Even with them at the sides, the pattern loses something for me. Just used to seeing them above and below now.
 

Jockiescott

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The last one of these I have to tie, I Think. :redface:

This is the simplified version. What many people call a "Modern Curry's Red", but this pattern has been around for such a long time. It was listed in "Along the Faughan Side" as the "Red Bug", listed in Peter O' Reilly's book as the "Badger and red" or as I've heard it referred to along the river as the "Red and Black Shrimp". Basically a Curry's Red minus veilings.

It is still a lovely pattern in it's own right and I have tied and fished it over the years but I cannot, personally, call it a Curry's Red.

DSC_0419.JPG

I'll have a few new additions for the box anyway after this! :lol:

DSC_0422.JPG
 

Jockiescott

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Great thread Richard :thumb::thumb:

Thanks Gary! Passed a bit of time on the days I wasn't busy. I'll try to get things altogether now for a blog post in the next week or so. Hopefully it will be worth reading! :redface:
 

simonjh98

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I find that the Curries looks best when you use Red uni floss as the veiling's, and then brush them out with a toothbrush. They stand out massively in the water
 

FaughanPurple

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Excellent series of photos Jockie ,

Wasnt the original Idian Crow or goose shoulder dyed Scarlet.. when I can be bothered putting them in, I've settled on using hackle tips as a sub these days.. less bulk and more movement than other materials...
 

Jockiescott

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I find that the Curries looks best when you use Red uni floss as the veiling's, and then brush them out with a toothbrush. They stand out massively in the water

I must try that but I'm not sure I have any red unifloss just at the minute.

As long as their are veilings of some description, I really don't mind.
 

Ypres

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Fascinating post. Superb ties throughout. Two questions. The tail looks lovely and bright. Did you dye it yourself?
Is there a link to a completed blog?
Len
 

Jockiescott

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Fascinating post. Superb ties throughout. Two questions. The tail looks lovely and bright. Did you dye it yourself?
Is there a link to a completed blog?
Len

Thanks Ypres! 👍

You can read the blog post here:


The tails on those aren’t dyed at all and are all natural. They were off the best GP skin I ever used. I got it from Cookshill. Unfortunately, it’s all picked out now and I haven’t been able to get a GP skin since of that quality.

Hope you enjoy the blog post! 😊
 
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