Covering deep pools with slow moving water

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I’m not a fan of sinking lines in general as I don’t like the idea of the line running through the fish and so in general it’s a floater and polyleader for me. That’s also because on my club water there is no need for anything else though. Some good advice on that above though.
Very good point, also about getting the line through the fish.
 

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I fish pools like this quite frequently. From the off it helps if you're seeing fish, if they are there then start with a long leader and a non too heavy flee 1st off.Never retrieve in a straight line, try and get a curve into the line, short twitchy retrieve make that flee look alive. I often get them as the line straightens out and the flee begins to climb in the water column
If no joy, it helps to know the depth of the pool, weighted flee, long leader, let it sink deep down and a bobbly up n down retrieve, bounce your flee through, again get that curve in your line.
Last resort is to use a big sink tip or full sinker, only as this can produce excess noise and disturbance, and it can disturb fish, ideally you want the flee down there at fish level and not the fly line.
Shall we say, done improperly you'll catch plenty of fish, but they won't be hooked in the mouth.
There's no easy path here, you'll need to feel your way into the particular pools you fish, see what works- maybe even whats allowed!
Fritz body and a marabou tail on a strong single, works in the slightest currents. Leave some std and tie some up weighted, swop n change.
Last tip, don't strike, fo8 retrieve and when you get a take, keep the rod point low on the waters surface, keep fo8 ing and walk backwards to set the hook!, your arm shouldn't get much past the butt ring!.
It can be a boring way of fishing, but takes when they come are usually very very positive.You need the patience and mind set to keep at it, frequently there's very little to indicate where fish might be, so work the water, cover it all best as you can and eventually things will become clear and you'll learn where.
Best of luck, Pedro.
Top advise, also about walking back to set the hook, i sometimes see in pools like this very big fish, so definetely have to put some work into it. It definetely requires a different mind setup to fish these on purpose, but sometimes as yoi say, one can be rewarded with very big fish indeed.
 

Jockiescott

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It might surprise many just how small you can fish in those pools mentioned above.

Seeing a huge swirl and boil on the surface of a flat calm pool, really is something that gets the heart pumping and goosebumps standing on end! 😉
 

Fruin

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It might surprise many just how small you can fish in those pools mentioned above.

Seeing a huge swirl and boil on the surface of a flat calm pool, really is something that gets the heart pumping and goosebumps standing on end! 😉
If you are fishing a beat where fish are running and resting in other spots, then I would target the spots that are best suited to the fly before trying to get a fish out of a slow pool not ideally suited to fishing a fly. As a good pal of mine used to say "action water, action fish!"
However, if you are limited to a slow pool as either the only pool that seems to be holding fish that are resident, or, the only pool that running fish seem to be stopping for a breather in, then I guess you would have little option but to target them there.
I would say there is not one answer to this conundrum and a lot will depend on the fish you are targeting.

If it was fish that had been in a while, then I would start with a relatively small fly fished slowly at depth.

If it was fish that were relatively fresh to the pool I would try a bigger pattern near the surface fished a little faster, especially if I was expecting new fish to enter the pool. Others have mentioned trying to get a curve the line and possibly backing up to get a more enticing movement on the fly. Sometimes, it also pays to fish a largish muddler or collie dog style fly on a dropper with a much smaller fly at least three foot away on the point.

Always be aware that if the pool is slow and calm, the fish will be more easily spooked, so, it also pays to go through once and rest it for a period of time before trying it again, with the same caveat that this may not be as necessary if you are expecting fresh fish to come into the pool.

Quite often in these circumstances we may try a few tactics and think that when we get one we have cracked the code, when often it is just that we have nailed one that is fresh into the pool!

Like I said, there are no clear winners as far as tactics are concerned when we are stuck on less than ideal water. The sink and draw methods that others mentioned can work in these pools, especially with a slight upstream cast to get the sinking part right.

Last light is also a good time to try these pools as fish will come off their lies and move around the pool, usually making them more willing to take a passing fly.

I suppose we've not even considered other factors like weather. If it is early spring and very cold, then a big slow pool like you mention may just be perfect for slowly swinging your fly or a slow retrieve through it.
 

tenet

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Just a thought - taking a tip from trout fishing how about a fast sinking line with a salmon fly replete with booby eyes so that the fly doesn't hank up on the bottom. Wang it out let it settle and inch back. Works with floating Devon minnows below a Wye lead.
 

uskgrub

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irish shrimp tyed on a tube with a tungsten conehead, fish it sink and draw with short sharp strips, sink tip line with long leader
 

Rennie

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Just a thought - taking a tip from trout fishing how about a fast sinking line with a salmon fly replete with booby eyes so that the fly doesn't hank up on the bottom. Wang it out let it settle and inch back. Works with floating Devon minnows below a Wye lead.
That can work out expensive!, rivers can and do have stoney bottoms, bit of a rough bottom to your pool and it can shred your line in quick time, also if there's vestige of current, it'll swing and pull the line into the stones, rocks etc all the more!.
As I also said in my reply to the thread, you need to be very very carefull with fast sinking lines down amongst any fish!, foul hooking- intentionally or not!- can lead to you the angler developing a reputation you don't want!.
I've tried the down deep n dirty way, but seem to do far better with a fly accelerating up and away from Salar, preferably not in a straight path.
I've also had one or two fish " on the drop" as the fly hits the water and begins to fall down ward, had a few fish roll on the flee right away, I've seen the flash and had to run backwards to tighten to them quickly!.
Like I say and as do others, you need to experiment, see what works in your circumstances.
Pedro.
 
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