Conference: Can salmon farming be regulated to effectively protect wild salmonids?

Blackshrimp

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18 February 2017: Salthill Hotel, Salthill, Galway
Salmon Watch Ireland


Conference Brochure and Conference Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/can-salmon-farming-be-regulated-to-effectively-protect-wild-salmonids-tickets-31029520130
Thanks for the heads up on this conference, I have booked my ticket!
I often get to hear of stuff via the Forum such as the recent sea lice report, which has basically told us what we have known for the last 30 years, despite denial from the salmon aquaculture crowd.
 
S

Seamus O'Neill

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Thanks for the heads up on this conference, I have booked my ticket!
I often get to hear of stuff via the Forum such as the recent sea lice report, which has basically told us what we have known for the last 30 years, despite denial from the salmon aquaculture crowd.
Good evening Blackshrimp. Tickets seem to be going fast . See you there.
 

Nigel Rush

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Spare ticket going for grabs.

Seamus O'Neil has sent me his ticket for tomorrow as due to work pressure can't make it.
The ticket is going for grabs, 'gratis' for anyone who calls me this evening at 087 9580702 and when I have your name I'll leave it in an envelope at the reception of the hotel that is hosting it.

Nigel.
 

Blackshrimp

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Some interesting nuggets from this conference. Salmon aquaculture regulation appears to be transfixed on the number of egg bearing sea lice per fish, when the number of fish carrying said lice should also feature highly and is equally important.
I was fascinated to learn that it takes 2 weeks for a sea lice infestation to work it's way around the Faroe Islands, these little buggers travel and no doubt will infest wild salmonids on their way. I now will have to go away and work out the circumference of the Faroe Islands although I think the excellent speaker from the Faroes did tell us. I am sure that it was more than 200km!
What was also made abundantly clear is that sea lice are a major if not the major problem for salmon fish farmers, as they can lead to exposure to all manner of disease.
Clearly regulation is not the answer, however well enforced and there lies another problem. Land based close containment is the only way to go.
With warmer sea temperatures, does anybody know if farmed sea bass host sea lice?
 
S

Seamus O'Neill

Guest
Some interesting nuggets from this conference. Salmon aquaculture regulation appears to be transfixed on the number of egg bearing sea lice per fish, when the number of fish carrying said lice should also feature highly and is equally important.
I was fascinated to learn that it takes 2 weeks for a sea lice infestation to work it's way around the Faroe Islands, these little buggers travel and no doubt will infest wild salmonids on their way. I now will have to go away and work out the circumference of the Faroe Islands although I think the excellent speaker from the Faroes did tell us. I am sure that it was more than 200km!
What was also made abundantly clear is that sea lice are a major if not the major problem for salmon fish farmers, as they can lead to exposure to all manner of disease.
Clearly regulation is not the answer, however well enforced and there lies another problem. Land based close containment is the only way to go.
With warmer sea temperatures, does anybody know if farmed sea bass host sea lice?
Sorry I missed the talk but some of us have to work !! I hope somebody got the use of my ticket !!!

I hear that Scottish sea anglers are up in arms over Scottish Fish Farmers paying BIG money to have thousands of Wrasse netted from the Scottish shoreline and transported to their farms . Most die during transport , the rest live a few weeks. They are even buying Wrasse from unscrupulous net men from abroad and paying up to £3 per fish.
 

KerrySalmon

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Thanks for attending conference. The issue of biomass on farms has long been a contentious issue and the level of infestation. Presently our water is too cold to rear bass but these are also affected by Caligus elongatus which can also affect salmonids. Our water is too warm for rearing cod but as mentioned at conference our coastline may be too warm to farm salmon also like Southern Norway.
Disease and parasites have potential to force issue of closed containment either on land or at sea. One other feature at the conference was the issue of super smolts which could be moved to sea ate up to 0.5kg and only in cages at sea for a period outside critical times.The issue of spread of lice in Ireland is not probably an issue outside bays as the industry is small but expanding same may result in wider distribution. Just to inform you there are two different species of lice, Lep salmonis (limited to salmonids) and Caligus elongatus (Many marine species but does affect salmon and sea trout). The ultimate solution is closed containment and Ireland can be a leader in this if political willingness is there. We along with many others are embroiled in the Shot Head Marine Harvest appeal and we sense a small change in attitude from Government but a lot of work needs to take place. The issue of dwindling stocks is alarming and appears to be a slide which started around late 80s. One aspect of our own coastal ecosystem is that the water temp is increasing and in scenarios like this cold water fish move north thus our salmon may move to more northern areas of the Atlantic. Always remember salmon are only here since last ice age (12k) and could move again. It was interesting to hear about the Gilt Head Bream and their increased presence in Ireland.One thing is certain that if we have optimum conditions at sea, stocks will recover quickly.

Some interesting nuggets from this conference. Salmon aquaculture regulation appears to be transfixed on the number of egg bearing sea lice per fish, when the number of fish carrying said lice should also feature highly and is equally important.
I was fascinated to learn that it takes 2 weeks for a sea lice infestation to work it's way around the Faroe Islands, these little buggers travel and no doubt will infest wild salmonids on their way. I now will have to go away and work out the circumference of the Faroe Islands although I think the excellent speaker from the Faroes did tell us. I am sure that it was more than 200km!
What was also made abundantly clear is that sea lice are a major if not the major problem for salmon fish farmers, as they can lead to exposure to all manner of disease.
Clearly regulation is not the answer, however well enforced and there lies another problem. Land based close containment is the only way to go.
With warmer sea temperatures, does anybody know if farmed sea bass host sea lice?
 

reddie

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Thanks for attending conference. The issue of biomass on farms has long been a contentious issue and the level of infestation. Presently our water is too cold to rear bass but these are also affected by Caligus elongatus which can also affect salmonids. Our water is too warm for rearing cod but as mentioned at conference our coastline may be too warm to farm salmon also like Southern Norway.
Disease and parasites have potential to force issue of closed containment either on land or at sea. One other feature at the conference was the issue of super smolts which could be moved to sea ate up to 0.5kg and only in cages at sea for a period outside critical times.The issue of spread of lice in Ireland is not probably an issue outside bays as the industry is small but expanding same may result in wider distribution. Just to inform you there are two different species of lice, Lep salmonis (limited to salmonids) and Caligus elongatus (Many marine species but does affect salmon and sea trout). The ultimate solution is closed containment and Ireland can be a leader in this if political willingness is there. We along with many others are embroiled in the Shot Head Marine Harvest appeal and we sense a small change in attitude from Government but a lot of work needs to take place. The issue of dwindling stocks is alarming and appears to be a slide which started around late 80s. One aspect of our own coastal ecosystem is that the water temp is increasing and in scenarios like this cold water fish move north thus our salmon may move to more northern areas of the Atlantic. Always remember salmon are only here since last ice age (12k) and could move again. It was interesting to hear about the Gilt Head Bream and their increased presence in Ireland.One thing is certain that if we have optimum conditions at sea, stocks will recover quickly.
Thank you for hosting the conference. Very interesting and informative. Found the Faroese method of enforcing lower production on salmon farms found in breach of regulations very clever as small financial penalties aren't enough of a deterrent. Best quote of the day was Dr. Ciaran Byrne's... control the controllable. A lot of work has been done in this respect and so much more to do. There's very little we can do to change rising sea temp's and changing currents. The primary objective is to allow as many, high quality salmon smolts as possible migrate from our rivers. Improving habitat, water quality, reducing predation, etc etc is what we all need to strive to do. More also needs to be done with poaching and by-catch of salmon in the high seas.
One question on the subject of super smolts and delaying their transport to sea cages until after May... how will this protect coastal dwelling sea trout which will still be present in areas of elevated sea lice levels up to 30km from the cages? Sea trout smolts will be offered increased protection over that time period but will still be vulnerable at a later stage.
 

KerrySalmon

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Thank you for hosting the conference. Very interesting and informative. Found the Faroese method of enforcing lower production on salmon farms found in breach of regulations very clever as small financial penalties aren't enough of a deterrent. Best quote of the day was Dr. Ciaran Byrne's... control the controllable. A lot of work has been done in this respect and so much more to do. There's very little we can do to change rising sea temp's and changing currents. The primary objective is to allow as many, high quality salmon smolts as possible migrate from our rivers. Improving habitat, water quality, reducing predation, etc etc is what we all need to strive to do. More also needs to be done with poaching and by-catch of salmon in the high seas.
One question on the subject of super smolts and delaying their transport to sea cages until after May... how will this protect coastal dwelling sea trout which will still be present in areas of elevated sea lice levels up to 30km from the cages? Sea trout smolts will be offered increased protection over that time period but will still be vulnerable at a later stage.
Certainly would be still be problem for sea trout but most damage is done on entry to ocean during smoltification and when kelt sea trout enter ocean (Problems associated with changing to salt water tolerance which makes them prone to infection) . If super smolts were treated prior to stocking with Slice you would get around 6-10 weeks lice free on farms. They might be harvested prior to wild migration following year. Probably smaller size at harvest. The real problem is length of time farmed fish are at sea and buildup of lice larvae
 
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