Coloured Fly Fines

salarium

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Above is just a general illustration of different coloured fly lines on the market .

It is the line head colour that varies a lot , Olive green ,orange,brown ,grey,black, white ,cream, ice blue, dark blue ,yellow, clear , etc

I reckon the best coloured lines to fish with are white,cream or ice blue, these being the colour of the sky, viewing what the fish sees above in clear or clearing water, Bright orange heads on lines don't appeal to me , as this may spook fish ? ok for running line though ,

Going way back when , only 3 main colours white/cream, green and brown mainly Scientific Anglers lines ?no multi coloured lines as of today

Versi type leaders come mainly in white/cream floating ,,dark green slow sink ,,brown fast sink ,. grey or black extra fast sink colours, I must admit I have never used a floating versi leader, where is the point of that, just use a full floating line .

Also I cannot be done with loop to loop running lines and heads , I only fish with integrated running lines, shame there isn't a decent choice of sink tip lines on the market ?

You can pay as much for some running lines as as a full fly line these days .the fly lines of today are a doddle to cast than the old double taper and WF lines ,
 
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MCXFisher

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Actually, when you look at the underside of any line of whatever colour from below in the water it generally appears grey or black, depending on the strength and angle of incidence of the ambient light. This is because there is no light reflected upwards from the bottom of the river to illuminate the underside.

When viewed obliquely (i.e. below 45 degrees elevation from the fish) the visible element will appear as a grey line with a light edge.

Moreover, the coloured water as found in the Tyne and many Scottish rivers rapidly absorbs the red portion of the spectrum, about 30% per metre travelled through the water. Thus a salmon lying about 1.5 metres deep about 2 metres from an orange object or line will only see some 24% or less of its red content. The net effect is to make orange look grey.

By and large the physics suggest that the colour of the fly line doesn't make much difference.
 

bankwheel

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I'm a bit fussy when it comes to colours, don't like bright colours like Gaelforce green or rio tracker orange but I don't think it makes any difference to the fish as MXC says. I also don't fish any integrated lines now preferring shooting heads for ease of change and the fact that I have less reels now.
I do like the shorter length and lightness of my SL heads, would be good if more companies followed this rather than the standard length of 37 to 39'. Also longer heads could be handy at times, maybe around 42 to 44', only a few companies do this. I would like to see a decent multi tip line, there is still not a good one on the market yet, they are all a bit clunky, I think they should reduce the tip length as the density increases instead of sticking to standard 10 or15' lengths.
Generally lines are better than they have ever been with loads of choice to satisfy everyone.
 

phil.b

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I'm a bit fussy when it comes to colours, don't like bright colours like Gaelforce green or rio tracker orange but I don't think it makes any difference to the fish as MXC says. I also don't fish any integrated lines now preferring shooting heads for ease of change and the fact that I have less reels now.
I do like the shorter length and lightness of my SL heads, would be good if more companies followed this rather than the standard length of 37 to 39'. Also longer heads could be handy at times, maybe around 42 to 44', only a few companies do this. I would like to see a decent multi tip line, there is still not a good one on the market yet, they are all a bit clunky, I think they should reduce the tip length as the density increases instead of sticking to standard 10 or15' lengths.
Generally lines are better than they have ever been with loads of choice to satisfy everyone.
The new LTS multi tip is a great line bankwheel :nod:
 

JirkaK

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I believe that fish don´t care about the colour of the fly line.... As long as the leader is long enough.

For those with different opinion there is Vision Ace Clear Float SH.
 

Neil W

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Its definitely true to say we have a great choice of lines and there are many very good ones. I think the problem could actually be there are too many and matching rods to lines can be a mine field even for very experienced anglers.
I have never been too bothered about fly line colours. I know the guides in New Zealand prefer subtle olive coloured lines which they believe don't scare fish as much as bright lines. I fish both small and big rivers and must say for the smaller river I do use the Rio scandi outbound which is a nice dull olive colour which may give me an edge but its probably only in my head. Its also an integrated line which I definitely prefer in a smaller river as I often fish shorter or retrieve the fly and don't want the loop to loop bumping through the eyes. For general fishing and for big rivers I use heads and the loop to loop system is very flexible, you can also buy some excellent and relatively cheap running lines.
One point about loop to loop heads is that when I used to fish for seatrout at night in Argentina the loop to loop was an excellent way of sensing when you had the right amount of line out to be able to cast. Bring the head in, feel the bump of the loop to loop, maybe let out 12 inches of running line and cast. Very easy
 

Mattytree

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Not a salmon line but I really rate the cortland camo intermediate lines and feel they give you an edge ,I’ve definitely caught more in the boat than my partner using it on occasions.

I know a fella who only fishes the green Rio outbound and does very well Neil, I do have it as an option but for some reason always have the air flow rage set up on that rod Keep meaning to put the olive Rio out bound I brought for a 9-10 oracle on it and try in low conditions.
I’m pretty happy with the greys and creams of the Rio outbound I use and have gone over the same lies picking up fish when the guy fishing the olive 10 minutes before hasn’t
 

Rennie

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I am a fan of doing as much as you can to try and catch Salmon.Flyline colour, keeping that big thick shadow casting rope as far away as possible from the flee as is practical seems common sense to me.I usually try and take everything I can and make it as good as I can for my advantage.
However!,I've had my best Tay catches in low clear water with tiny flee's with floating heads that are absolutely bright fluro. Orange or Red,I've had Tweed fish at the back end on the same floating head and Dee fish as well.
Every bit of my head says fish will run a mile from a line this colour if they get as much of a glimpse of it, but it's never seemed to matter when ever I use it or indeed any of them!.One of my favourite float /sink1 heads is a bright yellow! and I've the same line in a very bright light green!.
I don't know what to think any more!.Frequently I do think we all catch Salmon very much in spite of what we do and not because of what we do.
As long as I keep catching the odd one or two!.
Pedro.
 

MCXFisher

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[/QUOTE]I don't know what to think any more!
Pedro.[/QUOTE]


Well Pedro, you know now! In most cases they can't see it.

If the head isn't within the 45 degree vision cone around and above the fish the only visible element will be the leader. Further away the main line will just me a narrow grey streak on the reflective under-surface of the water with one side lighter than the other depending on the angle of the sun.

If you put the head directly over the top of a fish what it sees is generally grey or black, depending on the light level.
 

ozzyian

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I'm a bit fussy when it comes to colours, don't like bright colours like Gaelforce green or rio tracker orange but I don't think it makes any difference to the fish as MXC says. I also don't fish any integrated lines now preferring shooting heads for ease of change and the fact that I have less reels now.
I do like the shorter length and lightness of my SL heads, would be good if more companies followed this rather than the standard length of 37 to 39'. Also longer heads could be handy at times, maybe around 42 to 44', only a few companies do this. I would like to see a decent multi tip line, there is still not a good one on the market yet, they are all a bit clunky, I think they should reduce the tip length as the density increases instead of sticking to standard 10 or15' lengths.
Generally lines are better than they have ever been with loads of choice to satisfy everyone.
I've just made a change for big rivers/bad conditions (or when I want very wide sink rate flexibility without spool changes so a spey line is out)

By bad conditions I mean wind (like last weeK) Under those circumstances I used to use an AFS tracker which as you know is a multi tip. I never thought it cast very nicely (seems to come down heavily even with the inter tip) and on bottom Tweed you're often going for distance so the 39' length isn't ideal either, the third thing is it's fluro orange!

I bought a Gaelforce EEMT (I think it's called) which I used last week - about 48' (so a bit less messing around with running line loops in a gale) and uses 15' multi tips. That's still a manageable length in wind whilst deep wading and it definitely seems to come down a lot nicer. If they made it integrated it would be even better (why a head only when it's multi tip?? - doesn't make sense) I think that line plus say a 60' spey multi tip (does anyone know who does one) would just about do me now on big waters.

Coming from the Tracker the Gaelforce green is a relief even if it is a tad bright. Happy to report that both caught fish (with a multi tip I'm pretty certain colour doesn't matter anyway since the body is so far from the fly, but by god that Rio fluro colour is an absolute eyesore)
 

salarium

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I don't know what to think any more!
Pedro.[/QUOTE]


Well Pedro, you know now! In most cases they can't see it.

If the head isn't within the 45 degree vision cone around and above the fish the only visible element will be the leader. Further away the main line will just me a narrow grey streak on the reflective under-surface of the water with one side lighter than the other depending on the angle of the sun.

If you put the head directly over the top of a fish what it sees is generally grey or black, depending on the light level.[/QUOTE]
--------------------------------
MCX
Interesting what you have said in your posts on lines ,

"Well Pedro, you know now! In most cases they can't see it." ??

"If you put the head directly over the top of a fish what it sees is generally grey or black, depending on the light level." ??

Can't see it ? What it sees ? Mark my word fish can see it ! any fly line that passes over them , maybe it don't scare or alarm them as the line is moving over them i a slow drift ,
 

charlieH

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If the head isn't within the 45 degree vision cone around and above the fish the only visible element will be the leader. Further away the main line will just me a narrow grey streak on the reflective under-surface of the water with one side lighter than the other depending on the angle of the sun.
Michael, I have to disagree with this. In their book "The Trout and the Fly", John Goddard and Brian Clarke show photographs of fly lines taken from underwater. As you say, in what they term the "window", i.e. the 45 degree cone above the fish, all lines look dark. However, in the "mirror" outside that area, where the lines are seen against a reflection of the river bed, not all lines look grey, and a pale green line is considerably more visible than a dark green or brown line. In the accompanying text, they say "...it is not the line in the air or the window that should be considered, but the line on the water in the mirror....There can be little doubt, as a consequence of our experiments and photographs...that white or light-coloured lines should not be used when the trout are close to the surface".

There is also anecdotal evidence that reinforces the view that colour matters. As has been mentioned, I understand that New Zealand guides consider bright lines to be an absolute no-no. And I recall reading a report of a world river fishing competition some years ago, held (I think) in Spain. One of the British competitors described how they were significantly outfished by another team, all of whom were using grey lines. The Brits either got hold of some grey lines or dyed their existing ones, and saw a marked upturn in their catches.

A friend of mine, who had over 2000 salmon to his own rod and of which all but a couple of handfuls have come from the same few miles of the lower Wye, is absolutely convinced that a dark line makes a really significant difference to catches in low water. He dyes his lines dark green or brown. And with a level of experience like that, I cannot help respecting his opinion!

You might argue that the Wye is something of a special case, in that it has a lot of very flat, gliding water, where the potential for disturbance is much greater. You might also point out that Goddard and Clarke's research was carried out on chalk streams, where the water is typically much clearer than in a typical salmon river. And in the bit I quoted from them, they do only say that pale lines shouldn't be used when the trout are near the surface.

Nevertheless, Robert Pashley, perhaps the greatest Wye fisherman ever, pointed out that fishers who exercise stealth and guile in the pursuit of trout, are all too often guilty of abandoning that when it comes to salmon fishing. And as I see it, there is rarely anything to be gained from using brightly coloured lines, and at times there may be something to be lost.
 

MCXFisher

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Charlie,

I think it is essential to differentiate between the light conditions prevailing in a very shallow chalk trout stream with crystalline water in the height of summer and those in a deeper, darker salmon river at higher latitude.. The levels of underwater light are entirely different. Moreover, the sensitivity of trout, which stay in pretty much the same place for years on end, to all manner of stimulants is several orders of magnitude greater than that of a salmon.

Fishing for trout on a limestone river in Yorkshire I have a bright yellow line on one rod and a grey line on the other. Of course I never put the line in the window above the fish, because that's rarely more than 2' 6" wide and often as little as 12", but I've never noticed any difference in success rate with the 2 rods over the past 40 years on the Rye.
 

Oscar

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The new LTS multi tip is a great line bankwheel :nod:
Which one is this phil.b, I can't find anything online for an 'LTS multi tip'.

I used a RIO SSVT last week, and agree it's a little clunky (especially the large join between head and tip when playing a lively fish!), and the inter tip has already failed at the join so not impressed.

Oscar.
 

Perrypokemon

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Tom Bell with his Sunray products has done a load of stuff regarding lines that supposedly fish cannot see from below. I was given a couple of trout lines to try out and find them a really decent fly line. As regards fish seeing or not seeing them I cannot offer conclusive evidence. They did not catch any more fish for me than the lines that I normally use.
 

phil.b

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Which one is this phil.b, I can't find anything online for an 'LTS multi tip'.

I used a RIO SSVT last week, and agree it's a little clunky (especially the large join between head and tip when playing a lively fish!), and the inter tip has already failed at the join so not impressed.

Oscar.
Its the new line that Trond Syrstad has designed Oscar its called the SCS line it's not a bad bit of kit.:fish:
 

Richardgw

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(why a head only when it's multi tip?? - doesn't make sense) I think that line plus say a 60' spey multi tip (does anyone know who does one) would just about do me now on big waters.
The Rio Short Head Spey is an integrated multi tip line but is sold with the floating tip only although this would be an advantage for you as you could use those from your Tracker. In the 9/10 and 10/11 versions the head measures 48ft and 50ft respectively.
 

Richardgw

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Whoops almost forgot. Another integrated multi tip scandi is the Michael Evans Dredger that comes with a belly of approx 30ft and 15ft tips. I had one in its original non integrated version and it cast well.
 

Lamson v10

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I just go fishing and enjoy :). I'm not fussed what color my fly line is.. Most of my line's are gaelforce ( bright green) and a cpl of ultraspey shooting heads kit's (white floating head and blue intermediate head) fished with a tapered leader or poly leader and tippet
 

pfeul

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I don't care about the fly line colour.
I have fished for several years some crystal clear rivers for brown trout here where 6 m long leaders, size 22 tiny emergers and 10/100 diameter were the usual and only way to catch fis. On the public beats of these rivers the fish are submitted to a very high angling pressure and can be spooked only because of a bad drift.
I've fished these rivers with a fluoro orange fly line as well as with a tan or light olive fly line, with no difference on the catching rate, in sunny as well as in dull days.
Walking on the fish, standing high on the bank, moving too quickly and hitting the rocks on the river bottom do far much more damage to the fishing than the fly line colour IMHO.
 

salarium

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Actually, when you look at the underside of any line of whatever colour from below in the water it generally appears grey or black, depending on the strength and angle of incidence of the ambient light. This is because there is no light reflected upwards from the bottom of the river to illuminate the underside.

When viewed obliquely (i.e. below 45 degrees elevation from the fish) the visible element will appear as a grey line with a light edge.

Moreover, the coloured water as found in the Tyne and many Scottish rivers rapidly absorbs the red portion of the spectrum, about 30% per metre travelled through the water. Thus a salmon lying about 1.5 metres deep about 2 metres from an orange object or line will only see some 24% or less of its red content. The net effect is to make orange look grey.

By and large the physics suggest that the colour of the fly line doesn't make much difference.

The colour of the fly line doesn't make much difference to anglers? but a fish will see a line coming into their vision at an angle way less than 45 degrees,and depending on where the fish is in a deep or shallower pool the colour will be visible ?
 
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