Casting Practice - On grass?

Cordite72

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I used to practice my casting with a trout rod on the grass. Is it possible to do the same with a salmon rod or is it better to find some water to do it on?
 

Rrrr

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Theres a way to do it tying an odd leader setup which gives drag and an anchor on the grass that ive seen before. Problem is that without an anchor point itl not work the same.

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Perrypokemon

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Practice on grass with a double handed rod is practical and useful. You must hold for an extended period of time when forming your D loop or you run the risk of skipping your anchor. Turn your head and watch your loop form, which you should also do when casting in water. Wait for the loop to fully mature before making your forward stroke. You should also be aware that your flyline will have a much shorter life when casting on grass rather than in water.
 

Grassy_Knollington

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Theres a way to do it tying an odd leader setup which gives drag and an anchor on the grass that ive seen before. Problem is that without an anchor point itl not work the same.

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Make a grass leader by using thick mono joined in short lengths to a total of say 12-18ft. Join the lengths together and leave about 1-5-2ft of mono between each section.

Join each length like you would when making a dropper and leave the tags 7- 10” long.

What you should end up with is a herring-bone type leader, with lots of tags hanging off. These tags help to grip the grass and provide an anchor of sorts.

Last time I did it, I had to be careful not to over-power the cast, there isn’t nearly as much anchor as you get from water.

If you over power, or maybe use a Skagit, you’ll get a nice bull-whip effect that is similar to the way my Grandad cast a 15ft Hardy Favourite😀
 
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firefly

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Casting on grass is perfect to train muscle memory, old line and thick grass leader with an old tube fly stopped by a bead. Not ideal to train distance casting, but what you gain from training on grass will result in further distance on water. Timing, loop forming, pull/push distribution of force and full stops (tight loops) can all be learned on grass. Even left/right hand up training becomes easy, I used to walk up and down my garden, casting and switching shoulders each time. After a while you manage to change hands with the line still in the air, which will help you doing false (direction adjustment) casts without the line touching water. My wife used to laugh at me and said I looked like a majorette.:lol:
 
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Rrrr

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Make a grass leader by using thick mono joined in short lengths to a total of say 12-18ft. Join the lengths together and leave about 1-5-2ft of mono between each section.

Join each length like you would when making a dropper and leave the tags 7- 10” long.

What you should end up with is a herring-bone type leader, with lots of tags hanging off. These tags help to grip the grass and provide an anchor of sorts.

Last time I did it, I had to be careful not to over-power the cast, there isn’t nearly as much anchor as you get from water.

If you over power, or maybe use a Skagit, you’ll get a nice bull-whip effect that is similar to the way my Grandad cast a 15ft Hardy Favourite
Yea, thats the thing i was thinking of, With the sticky out bits of mono but couldnt think how to explain it

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charlieH

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Do remember that double handed rods can be cast overhead as well as spey cast, and as such you can use them on grass in just the same way as your trout rod.

Even with a grass leader I don't find that spey casting on grass is entirely realistic; it doesn't punish you if you're late on the forward stroke in the way that too much 'line stick' on water does. But it does at least get you used to the feel of a rod, and as firefly says, it can be useful to get accustomed to the feel of handling a rod with the 'wrong' hand up, as well as your natural hand, which is a valuable skill. And the delivery stroke isn't so very different, whether you're casting overhead or speycasting, so you can practice pulling with your lower hand as well as pushing with your upper hand. Coming from single handed rods, this is something that you will need to learn.

One point to bear in mind if you're casting overhead is that you may want to have less line outside the rod tip than you would with a spey cast. With a shooting head, I reckon you can generally get away with having the full head outside the rod tip, though it will probably generate a greater load than you would get with a spey cast and you shouldn't force it too hard. With a longer headed line, however, you will need to pull in a few feet extra. I would be very wary of overheading a skagit line!
 

Safranfoer

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I used to practice on grass - and not just on grass. Indoors, on the sofa, just a rod handle. Just to embed the movements and timing (while muttering ‘ONEtwothreeONEtwothree’ under my breath). It’s all invaluable for those that don’t live near salmon water. Doesn’t help with anchor etc though, as observed.
 

salarchaser

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I used to practice on grass - and not just on grass. Indoors, on the sofa, just a rod handle. Just to embed the movements and timing (while muttering ‘ONEtwothreeONEtwothree’ under my breath). It’s all invaluable for those that don’t live near salmon water. Doesn’t help with anchor etc though, as observed.
Just like a waltz.

Hoping to put drainage in this year, but the corner of one of our fields gets standing water through the winter. Only 4 inches, but enough to anchor a line.
 

clydesider

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Coming a bit late to this thread but early days when I was having some lessons, I was shown this method in the drawing below for grass practice.
Excuse the poor artwork!
Push an anchor (screwdriver or peg) into the grass, tie your normal leader/line to it and step back with as much line as you wish for practice. Form a loop behind you and cast away! Not perfect but it gives you a feel for loading the rod and firing it upwards and away.
If practicing on your lawn the neighbours may phone for the men in white coats!
Mike
 

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Pompero

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Imo the most important points are training on anchor placement and a keeping a high rod tip on the forward stroke, just repeat it 10 000 times, grass or water. Its a bit different on grass as it doesn't stick and you might have to adapt (some good clues above), but you will benefit massively from this when you fish. I train on grass almost every day 20-60 min, albeit with a single hander. Good luck!
 
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