Bouncing betty devon minnows

dumbartonangler89

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Do you need to use a dropper link on your bouncing betty when using the devon minnow or can you have the weight directly free running on the line? If so how long should it be? Also are floating devons better than ones that sink? Thanks
 

porteouz

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No you don't have to, some people will fish a running weight on the line above the swivel. I personally use a dropper though, added advantage is you can use a weak link so if the weight gets caught up, particularly when playing a fish, it will break off. I use about 6 inches.
 

gwelsher

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Do you need to use a dropper link on your bouncing betty when using the devon minnow or can you have the weight directly free running on the line? If so how long should it be? Also are floating devons better than ones that sink? Thanks
As above use a 6-12" dropper attached to a free running swivel on the mainline.
Both types of devon have their uses but I prefer the wooden ones as you can keep the bait closer to the bottom for longer.
Use just enough weight to get to the bottom quickly but still swing with the current.
Cast at 45° downstream. As soon as you feel it hit the bottom keep it swinging with the help of winding if needed. When you feel it hit something solid immediately raise the rod tip gently to lift the weight over or around the obstruction. Fish the cast right into the near bank and wind the first couple of metres slowly giving a couple of little jerks just in case a fish is following.
Unless your river is very smooth you will initially lose some tackle until you get used to the pools and the method.
Try prospecting with a straight lead on the line end, no devon no swivel, and cast around the pools building up a picture of the bottom. A straight lead is a lot cheaper to lose than a complete set of end gear. I make notes whilst I do it to jog the memory later.
 

chrishconnolly

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There are so many Devon options you will get a preferred one and stick with it.
Floating wooden aluminium sinking but then you can have plastic floating plastic lead lined wooden with a copper tube wooden with a brass tube.
The newest one I'm currently working on is a wooden with a half copper tube which a s 2inch floating Devon with a 1" copper tube in the front end.
A now concept on me but it's what the customer ordered.
So as you can see the various types are almost as much as the colours available a veritable minefield.
 

gwelsher

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Something I forgot to mention was have your lead link on a running bead. If a fish breaks you he will then not have the lead attached to it.
 

yellowbelly

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There are so many Devon options you will get a preferred one and stick with it.
Floating wooden aluminium sinking but then you can have plastic floating plastic lead lined wooden with a copper tube wooden with a brass tube.
The newest one I'm currently working on is a wooden with a half copper tube which a s 2inch floating Devon with a 1" copper tube in the front end.
A now concept on me but it's what the customer ordered.
So as you can see the various types are almost as much as the colours available a veritable minefield.
makes it swim dead level in the water, maybe even a buoyant wiggle at tail end
 

sneakypeter

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Sean ,the link looks very heavy? It will not make much difference to lead requirements, maybe increase it if anything, all the tubing etc will not help, just use a small size pulley bead, a lenght of 15lb line and a clip, no tubing of any description. All the resistance comes from the devon, just strike the balance.
 

gwelsher

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As SP says it looks really heavy line. You want it to be lighter than the mainline.
That is a short bit of tubing. I use controllers with tubing 4" - 6" long in rocky swims. This is threaded directly onto the mainline via a running bead.
If the bottom is clean I will use a mono link to a arlesley bomb.

By the way as I am lead to believe, I stand to be corrected, These tube weights are called Worming Controllers. A Bouncing Betty is a heavy rubber ball with a swivel in it. I use these too and they are very effective.
 

Richardgw

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I note the preference of many is to have the dropper link sliding on the mainline. I did this when I used to worm as worms don’t spin and when a fish starts playing with the bait it doesn’t feel any resistance from the lead.

However, for spinning with wooden devons I attach the dropper link to the top eye (the one closest to rod) of the swivel between the mainline and trace. This forces the swivel to work to counter any line twist that might be caused by a fast spinning devon. In Summer when I use a small devon and don't want to bounce the bottom I will use a hillman lead again connected to the top ey of the swivel.
 

gwelsher

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I used to do it like that Richard until I had one fish wrap me around a rock and the mainline broke. This left the fish trailing a 2oz lead on a 20lb mono hooklength. That can still happen with the link method but it would then only have to break a 10lb link to free the weight.
I only use the original Sharpes BB swivels to try and over twist.
 

HantsAvon

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All good advice.
I usually use the controllers (as in gwelsher's post above), but thought a small tube and an effectively thinner link may be better.
I like the ease of changing weights using the tubing
 

Richardgw

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I used to do it like that Richard until I had one fish wrap me around a rock and the mainline broke. This left the fish trailing a 2oz lead on a 20lb mono hooklength. That can still happen with the link method but it would then only have to break a 10lb link to free the weight.
I only use the original Sharpes BB swivels to try and over twist.
Hi Gwelsher. I think you have misunderstood and what I was trying to say. I still use a dropper link (usually about 6 inches of 12 lbs) but it is tied to the swivel not running free. With trace and mainline much heavier, at least 18 lbs, in the event of the lead snagging it is just the lead that is lost.
 

gwelsher

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Hi Gwelsher. I think you have misunderstood and what I was trying to say. I still use a dropper link (usually about 6 inches of 12 lbs) but it is tied to the swivel not running free. With trace and mainline much heavier, at least 18 lbs, in the event of the lead snagging it is just the lead that is lost.
Sorry for the misunderstanding Richard. I didn't really think you would be fishing like that.
 

chrishconnolly

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I don't use a running lead although I used to when fishing the river forth.
There we used a large ball weight running between two swivels and a big dod of plasticine around it to add more weight.
If it got snagged then the plasticine pulled off giving your rig back.
Now to the Tay start with a three way swivel and attached is your Betty via a piece of light telephone wire. Approx 12" of 30lb line as a rubbing leader for the Betty then a rolling swivel and approx 24" of 15lb line to the Devon.
All the rigs shown in this thread I'm sure will have their uses and I for one have learned from the others on show
 
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