Boot soles

roberthenaghan

New member
Messages
57
Reaction score
0
Location
West of Ireland
Ive a pair of guideline boots with felt soles and put studs in them. I hate the sound of metal on rock/gravel and cant imaging this is doing anything for the fish either. Want to change to rubber grip soles - anyone know if this is wise / doable?
 

The flying Scotsman

Active member
Messages
393
Reaction score
70
Location
Dundee
Felt and studs is a thousand miles better than vibram. Whoever invented vibram rubber soles for wading should be shot. They are dangerous in the water. It’s like standing on ice. You will end up putting studs in the rubber.
 

Rrrr

Well-known member
Messages
6,072
Reaction score
59
Depends how and where you are fishing in my opinion. Ive got 2 pairs of the same boots, 1 has felt with studs and the other the simms vibram with studs. For the tyne felt is better by a country mile but for the coquet where im walking muddy banks and putting the miles in the vibrams alot better as i find the felt too slippy on the wet grass and mud.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 

The flying Scotsman

Active member
Messages
393
Reaction score
70
Location
Dundee
Depends how and where you are fishing in my opinion. Ive got 2 pairs of the same boots, 1 has felt with studs and the other the simms vibram with studs. For the tyne felt is better by a country mile but for the coquet where im walking muddy banks and putting the miles in the vibrams alot better as i find the felt too slippy on the wet grass and mud.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
I agree but would much rather have the better grip in the water than on the bank. You won’t drown falling on the bank. And you still put studs in the vibram which is what he’s trying to avoid.
 

charlieH

Well-known member
Messages
2,993
Reaction score
43
If your studs are grating on rocks all the time, it may be that you have put too many of them into the sole. Apart from anything else, if the studs are in contact with the rocks on the river bed, it probably means that the felt isn't - which rather defeats the point of having felt soles!

There are lots of old threads about how and where to put studs, but I just put about half a dozen in an arc around the rear of the heel, and the same around the front of the toe. That way, if your foot slips or if you're searching for a foothold they will grip, but when you have a decent foothold it's the felt that is in contact with the rocks.
 

Rennie

Well-known member
Messages
4,956
Reaction score
28
Location
Gods County
In all honesty, any rubber without studs can be pretty leathal over rocks, boulders and especially slab rocks.You do really need some form of tungsten studding in then!, the key word there is Tungsten!.I agree about the noise factor, I often cringe at the racket my boots can make.
I own two pairs of boots, one Vibram and studs, the other cheaper pair are felt and studs.
I keep the felt n studs for low water and Sea Trout sorties after dark!.
I've come an absolute and painful cropper on a perfectly flat field in the dark walking on wet grass with felt soles!.I don't think there's a one size fits all solution, rather what will suit your own circumstances better!.The only thing that does matter and I cant emphasise enough is Tungsten for the studs.Once any stud looses its edge and becomes a flat surface its worse than useless and can be more dangerous than a boot without studs.For studs to work effectively they need an edge to grip on stone rock etc and to cut through claggy weedy muck on the river bed.
Pedro.
 

The flying Scotsman

Active member
Messages
393
Reaction score
70
Location
Dundee
I spent nearly £50 on supatrax tungsten studs enough for me and the young lads boots and it nearly broke my heart paying that for a wee bag of studs but it’s been the best £50 on tackle I’ve spent over the closed season and I went nuts and blew a fortune :D
 

lowforcefly

Member
Messages
358
Reaction score
9
Location
Upper Teesdale
One style doesn't fit all /

Personally, I don't think there is any one answer to this....other than studs in both types of soles.
Thought of ear plugs ?:redface:

Charlie H is right ...the installation pattern is different, and needs to be carefully considered for each type...Felt / Vibram.

I prefer vibram, but without studs they are lethal...Supatracks for me, mix of long and short....on simms g 3's use the pre moulded install positions, but think of where your weight is going to be applying greatest pressure...short under ball of foot, and instep...long everywhere else...it is about how the stud protrudes over the tread, and which part of the sole will compress the greatest, against rock, under your weight.
My local river is remote, and requires long walks, so, as Rrr, suggests felt isn't that great in that scenario....wet grass, and soft mud blinding the felt, is not a pleasant experience...and bloody hard work !:shocked:
Some of the river is rounded 'Whin Cil,' really hard, like curling stone material, and some sharp edged volcanic which shreds felt in a couple of sessions
All in all, it is a trade off at best...look at the rivers / terrain you regularly incur and find the best compromise....2 or 3 miles of river rarely throws up exactly the same terrain ?:nod:

One thing I would say is that if you need studs ...a wading staff is a must !

Not the best answer to your conundrum...but hope it helps !

Mel....
 

Rrrr

Well-known member
Messages
6,072
Reaction score
59
Personally, I don't think there is any one answer to this....other than studs in both types of soles.
Thought of ear plugs ?:redface:

Charlie H is right ...the installation pattern is different, and needs to be carefully considered for each type...Felt / Vibram.

I prefer vibram, but without studs they are lethal...Supatracks for me, mix of long and short....on simms g 3's use the pre moulded install positions, but think of where your weight is going to be applying greatest pressure...short under ball of foot, and instep...long everywhere else...it is about how the stud protrudes over the tread, and which part of the sole will compress the greatest, against rock, under your weight.
My local river is remote, and requires long walks, so, as Rrr, suggests felt isn't that great in that scenario....wet grass, and soft mud blinding the felt, is not a pleasant experience...and bloody hard work !:shocked:
Some of the river is rounded 'Whin Cil,' really hard, like curling stone material, and some sharp edged volcanic which shreds felt in a couple of sessions
All in all, it is a trade off at best...look at the rivers / terrain you regularly incur and find the best compromise....2 or 3 miles of river rarely throws up exactly the same terrain ?:nod:

One thing I would say is that if you need studs ...a wading staff is a must !

Not the best answer to your conundrum...but hope it helps !

Mel....
Yep, kee deep silty mud and felt soles just dont mix. I slipped while jumping the mud last season and ended up getting stuck in the mud for ages


Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 
Top