Big Sea Trout

reelit1

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I remember it well.

Arrived at the Towy during the day at some time and fished Cystanog and Palace beats hoping for a fresh fish off the tide.
Several hours later and nothing.Packed in and went to Barley Mount fishing late afternoon and into the dusk as it crept in.

Was thinking of packing in but decided to fish Nantgaredig further down.Got to the pool.
Set up Hardy Gem 10ft 7wt,12Ib Maxima and a shakey blue intermediate line with a size 10 double on.

There was one guy below me fishing,so I got in above him and few casts later and into the V of the river the rod tip was pulled down not hard just like a weight was attached.

Lifted into the rod and thought a fish of about couple of pounds.Not moving much then it did and assuming it was slightly bigger.

Then a tail came out of the river like the size of a shovel !! Jesus Christ I thought.
It made no big runs as such and just powered up and down.
The old guy below me netted it and took the photos, I was bloody shocked and shouting.
At 18 pounds it was released and swam off.
Shaking I went back to the car as couldn't fish anymore,then realised I threw my rod into the bankside when it was landed.
Had to run back across the fields to get it.

Guys fishing further up heard me shouting and wished they'd come down to look as I found out later.

Have never come anywhere near it.

Had this painting done then by John Searl.

Sewinfly.......
Clonker of a fish and a damned good rendition of a painting, he has really caught the scene. Well done.
 

Don CurlyHorny

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I remember it well.

Arrived at the Towy during the day at some time and fished Cystanog and Palace beats hoping for a fresh fish off the tide.
Several hours later and nothing.Packed in and went to Barley Mount fishing late afternoon and into the dusk as it crept in.

Was thinking of packing in but decided to fish Nantgaredig further down.Got to the pool.
Set up Hardy Gem 10ft 7wt,12Ib Maxima and a shakey blue intermediate line with a size 10 double on.

There was one guy below me fishing,so I got in above him and few casts later and into the V of the river the rod tip was pulled down not hard just like a weight was attached.

Lifted into the rod and thought a fish of about couple of pounds.Not moving much then it did and assuming it was slightly bigger.

Then a tail came out of the river like the size of a shovel !! Jesus Christ I thought.
It made no big runs as such and just powered up and down.
The old guy below me netted it and took the photos, I was bloody shocked and shouting.
At 18 pounds it was released and swam off.
Shaking I went back to the car as couldn't fish anymore,then realised I threw my rod into the bankside when it was landed.
Had to run back across the fields to get it.

Guys fishing further up heard me shouting and wished they'd come down to look as I found out later.

Have never come anywhere near it.

Had this painting done then by John Searl.

Sewinfly.......
Superb fish Sewinfly

DCH
 

Rennie

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I remember it well.

Arrived at the Towy during the day at some time and fished Cystanog and Palace beats hoping for a fresh fish off the tide.
Several hours later and nothing.Packed in and went to Barley Mount fishing late afternoon and into the dusk as it crept in.

Was thinking of packing in but decided to fish Nantgaredig further down.Got to the pool.
Set up Hardy Gem 10ft 7wt,12Ib Maxima and a shakey blue intermediate line with a size 10 double on.

There was one guy below me fishing,so I got in above him and few casts later and into the V of the river the rod tip was pulled down not hard just like a weight was attached.

Lifted into the rod and thought a fish of about couple of pounds.Not moving much then it did and assuming it was slightly bigger.

Then a tail came out of the river like the size of a shovel !! Jesus Christ I thought.
It made no big runs as such and just powered up and down.
The old guy below me netted it and took the photos, I was bloody shocked and shouting.
At 18 pounds it was released and swam off.
Shaking I went back to the car as couldn't fish anymore,then realised I threw my rod into the bankside when it was landed.
Had to run back across the fields to get it.

Guys fishing further up heard me shouting and wished they'd come down to look as I found out later.

Have never come anywhere near it.

Had this painting done then by John Searl.

Sewinfly.......
To quote Chris Tarrant, "This is What They Want" !.
Pedro
 

Scierra

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Any double figure seatrout 10 lbs + is worthy of recognition in any catch records , and could be classed as a fish of a lifetime. I have grassed aprox 10 x 10 lb plus, largest 12 lbs . all on the North & South, Main Tyne & Wear
Once grassed 2 x 10 lbers in an afternoon a cock and a hen fish on the Wear , but never had a double figure seatrout in the last 10 years ?

Catching 10lb + seatrout is on par with 20lb + salmon .

Way back in the 60's we would see washed up carcasses of spawners on the Wear ,that would of easily broken the British rod caught record of then 22.5 lbs
 
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Invermarnoch

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A while ago, Moc Morgan, now sadly departed from this life, made the the point that killing very big sea-trout was bound to have an adverse effect on the gene-pool which produced such worthy specimens. I think that must be incontrovertible. Further, it is my understanding that usually very large sea-trout are hens. If that be correct, then we should never kill big fish. Now, let me admit right away that I think that sea-trout are among the best eating fish. And a big fish, unarguably, looks glorious poached gently and served on a platter to friends along with potatoes and vegetables or salads of one's choice. Finnock too are utterly delicious. But surely we should all learn to distinguish hen and cock sea-trout and only take as many of the latter as we really need. With the advent of the lethal fish-farm industry, supported by the persistent folly and myopia of government, the days in which we could justify taking big baskets of this amazing creature have surely gone for good. I have done my share of nocturnal river-fishing for them, as well as loch-fishing, and it grieves me to think if we do not take only what we really need, then this fabulous resource will disappear for ever. There is evidence that sea-trout return to their former haunts when a fish farm closes; let the species survive and prosper in these regions, so that our case to government becomes indisputable.
 

ozzyian

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A while ago, Moc Morgan, now sadly departed from this life, made the the point that killing very big sea-trout was bound to have an adverse effect on the gene-pool which produced such worthy specimens. I think that must be incontrovertible. Further, it is my understanding that usually very large sea-trout are hens. If that be correct, then we should never kill big fish. Now, let me admit right away that I think that sea-trout are among the best eating fish. And a big fish, unarguably, looks glorious poached gently and served on a platter to friends along with potatoes and vegetables or salads of one's choice. Finnock too are utterly delicious. But surely we should all learn to distinguish hen and cock sea-trout and only take as many of the latter as we really need. With the advent of the lethal fish-farm industry, supported by the persistent folly and myopia of government, the days in which we could justify taking big baskets of this amazing creature have surely gone for good. I have done my share of nocturnal river-fishing for them, as well as loch-fishing, and it grieves me to think if we do not take only what we really need, then this fabulous resource will disappear for ever. There is evidence that sea-trout return to their former haunts when a fish farm closes; let the species survive and prosper in these regions, so that our case to government becomes indisputable.

Can you elaborate a bit on this point Invermarnoch - in as much as it reads that the impact on seatrout would be different to that of salmon, I am curious as to why that would be, thanks
 

ballintemple

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A while ago, Moc Morgan, now sadly departed from this life, made the the point that killing very big sea-trout was bound to have an adverse effect on the gene-pool which produced such worthy specimens. I think that must be incontrovertible. Further, it is my understanding that usually very large sea-trout are hens. If that be correct, then we should never kill big fish. Now, let me admit right away that I think that sea-trout are among the best eating fish. And a big fish, unarguably, looks glorious poached gently and served on a platter to friends along with potatoes and vegetables or salads of one's choice. Finnock too are utterly delicious. But surely we should all learn to distinguish hen and cock sea-trout and only take as many of the latter as we really need. With the advent of the lethal fish-farm industry, supported by the persistent folly and myopia of government, the days in which we could justify taking big baskets of this amazing creature have surely gone for good. I have done my share of nocturnal river-fishing for them, as well as loch-fishing, and it grieves me to think if we do not take only what we really need, then this fabulous resource will disappear for ever. There is evidence that sea-trout return to their former haunts when a fish farm closes; let the species survive and prosper in these regions, so that our case to government becomes indisputable.
I know that this thread is about fish in these islands, but there's evidence to support the points made above from Patagonia. It seems that the average size of fish in the Rio Grande got bigger when a catch and release policy was introduced.
 

Richardgw

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Can you elaborate a bit on this point Invermarnoch - in as much as it reads that the impact on seatrout would be different to that of salmon, I am curious as to why that would be, thanks
Sea trout are multiple spawners increasing in size each year with each spawning run. There are records of fish up to 12 years old and having spawned several times. So if fish are returned not only is there a good chance they will they spawn, but there is every chance they will survive spawning and return again the following year as larger fish..

Most salmon, on the other hand, die after spawning making multiple spawners much rarer.
 

Lewiswearfisher

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I remember it well.

Arrived at the Towy during the day at some time and fished Cystanog and Palace beats hoping for a fresh fish off the tide.
Several hours later and nothing.Packed in and went to Barley Mount fishing late afternoon and into the dusk as it crept in.

Was thinking of packing in but decided to fish Nantgaredig further down.Got to the pool.
Set up Hardy Gem 10ft 7wt,12Ib Maxima and a shakey blue intermediate line with a size 10 double on.

There was one guy below me fishing,so I got in above him and few casts later and into the V of the river the rod tip was pulled down not hard just like a weight was attached.

Lifted into the rod and thought a fish of about couple of pounds.Not moving much then it did and assuming it was slightly bigger.

Then a tail came out of the river like the size of a shovel !! Jesus Christ I thought.
It made no big runs as such and just powered up and down.
The old guy below me netted it and took the photos, I was bloody shocked and shouting.
At 18 pounds it was released and swam off.
Shaking I went back to the car as couldn't fish anymore,then realised I threw my rod into the bankside when it was landed.
Had to run back across the fields to get it.

Guys fishing further up heard me shouting and wished they'd come down to look as I found out later.

Have never come anywhere near it.

Had this painting done then by John Searl.

Sewinfly.......
Incredible fish congratulations mate 👍
 

ozzyian

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Sea trout are multiple spawners increasing in size each year with each spawning run. There are records of fish up to 12 years old and having spawned several times. So if fish are returned not only is there a good chance they will they spawn, but there is every chance they will survive spawning and return again the following year as larger fish..

Most salmon, on the other hand, die after spawning making multiple spawners much rarer.
Ahh of course, not genetic just by the act of returning itself.
 

Loxie

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Sea trout are multiple spawners increasing in size each year with each spawning run. There are records of fish up to 12 years old and having spawned several times. So if fish are returned not only is there a good chance they will they spawn, but there is every chance they will survive spawning and return again the following year as larger fish..

Most salmon, on the other hand, die after spawning making multiple spawners much rarer.
Another point worth considering is that the more they spawn the worse they are for eating. If I want to eat one these days I'd always choose a maiden spring run fish in the 2 to 4lb class. School Peal are delicious but I can't help think killing them is making an enemy of our future. I think the spottier they are the more likely they are to be multiple spawners too.
 

Handel

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Sea trout are multiple spawners increasing in size each year with each spawning run. There are records of fish up to 12 years old and having spawned several times. So if fish are returned not only is there a good chance they will they spawn, but there is every chance they will survive spawning and return again the following year as larger fish..

Most salmon, on the other hand, die after spawning making multiple spawners much rarer.
I hope you don't mind if I expand on this a bit Richard. As Invermarnoch said, most big sea trout are hens. And to get to that size they will have spawned several times. Work done at Exeter University has shown that where a river has these big hens it is their eggs that succeed and many of the fish in the river are their progeny. And of course they produce both sea trout and brown trout so they are important to both populations. Some rivers just don't seem to produce these large sea trout, is that a genetic thing limiting the size to which they can grow, don't know. But in case it is care needs to be taken. And having netsmen in the estuary targeting large fish is a killer in all senses. And if you eat one you are eating a well mended kelt with all the related scar tissue. It also means if you catch one it should be handled with care.

In Norway they refer to multi spawners in their salmon population and it seems much more common to have them. No idea why but it means they get this point about large sea trout much more readily.
 

marty31

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Another point worth considering is that the more they spawn the worse they are for eating. If I want to eat one these days I'd always choose a maiden spring run fish in the 2 to 4lb class. School Peal are delicious but I can't help think killing them is making an enemy of our future. I think the spottier they are the more likely they are to be multiple spawners too.
I think the northumbrian strain are often big but, yes repeat spawners, and the late ones repeat spawners, bad takers, and foul to eat, the earlier run are excellent eaters, fighters, and silver beauties, better than a spring salmon, i had a april 8lb fish a good few years ago! Sealiced and beautiful
 

Loxie

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I hope you don't mind if I expand on this a bit Richard. As Invermarnoch said, most big sea trout are hens. And to get to that size they will have spawned several times. Work done at Exeter University has shown that where a river has these big hens it is their eggs that succeed and many of the fish in the river are their progeny. And of course they produce both sea trout and brown trout so they are important to both populations. Some rivers just don't seem to produce these large sea trout, is that a genetic thing limiting the size to which they can grow, don't know. But in case it is care needs to be taken. And having netsmen in the estuary targeting large fish is a killer in all senses. And if you eat one you are eating a well mended kelt with all the related scar tissue. It also means if you catch one it should be handled with care.

In Norway they refer to multi spawners in their salmon population and it seems much more common to have them. No idea why but it means they get this point about large sea trout much more readily.
I believe there are basically two distinct types of sea trout. There is a slow growing short lived type that rarely exceed 3lb such as commonly found in the West of Ireland (pre salmon farming) and other rivers and a long lived fast growing type found in the North east of England, Wales and a few other rivers too.
 

happy days

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I believe there are basically two distinct types of sea trout. There is a slow growing short lived type that rarely exceed 3lb such as commonly found in the West of Ireland (pre salmon farming) and other rivers and a long lived fast growing type found in the North east of England, Wales and a few other rivers too.
Surely that depends on the quality of coastal food source ?
 
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The Flying Scotsman

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I’ve grown up around the Tay and earn and can’t ever remember seeing a decent sea trout caught. We just don’t seem to get many really big sea trout on the east coast of Scotland.
I fished the estuary for years in my wee boat for sea trout and had a lot of success. The biggest I landed was 5-6lb. Most fish were 2-3lb.
We reckoned that there’s a head of sea trout in the estuary that never run the rivers. They come in and out with the tide. We caught them from March til the end of season. Pure silver fish with few spots. I’ve been out on my boat and it’s been like a well stocked trout pond last hour of light with fish moving everywhere out there. I’ve had double and even treble hook ups which never ended well.
I miss going out on the estuary. I sold my wee boat last year after 27 years.
Main reason I struggled to get someone to join me and I couldn’t launch on my own. Then my knee broke down on me
 

Timmins

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I remember it well.

Arrived at the Towy during the day at some time and fished Cystanog and Palace beats hoping for a fresh fish off the tide.
Several hours later and nothing.Packed in and went to Barley Mount fishing late afternoon and into the dusk as it crept in.

Was thinking of packing in but decided to fish Nantgaredig further down.Got to the pool.
Set up Hardy Gem 10ft 7wt,12Ib Maxima and a shakey blue intermediate line with a size 10 double on.

There was one guy below me fishing,so I got in above him and few casts later and into the V of the river the rod tip was pulled down not hard just like a weight was attached.

Lifted into the rod and thought a fish of about couple of pounds.Not moving much then it did and assuming it was slightly bigger.

Then a tail came out of the river like the size of a shovel !! Jesus Christ I thought.
It made no big runs as such and just powered up and down.
The old guy below me netted it and took the photos, I was bloody shocked and shouting.
At 18 pounds it was released and swam off.
Shaking I went back to the car as couldn't fish anymore,then realised I threw my rod into the bankside when it was landed.
Had to run back across the fields to get it.

Guys fishing further up heard me shouting and wished they'd come down to look as I found out later.

Have never come anywhere near it.

Had this painting done then by John Searl.

Sewinfly.......
That’s the story’s !!! Superb what a fish
 

Handel

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I believe there are basically two distinct types of sea trout. There is a slow growing short lived type that rarely exceed 3lb such as commonly found in the West of Ireland (pre salmon farming) and other rivers and a long lived fast growing type found in the North east of England, Wales and a few other rivers too.
I wish it was that straightforward. Take two rivers, the Teifi and the Towy, their headwaters run off the same hill. The Towy is a big fish river. The Teifi has some big fish but the average size is much smaller. As Marty says you get at least a couple of strains of fish in the same river. I am not a C &R proponent but look after the big hens.
 

Nath

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My biggest was 10lb last season from south Tyne, what a fight on the 7wt!
 

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Rrrr

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Biggest ive had was 7 and a half and it gave me the runaround on the fly rod.
Lost what i rekon was a seatrout well into double figures at dusk earlier this year when the hook snapped. Im saying seatrout due to the way it behaved during the fight running into the near bank along the shallows.
Also had one around the 10lb mark nail a mepp a few weeks back near the bank but the hooks didnt stick.

Sent from my SM-G981B using Tapatalk
 

Loxie

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I wish it was that straightforward. Take two rivers, the Teifi and the Towy, their headwaters run off the same hill. The Towy is a big fish river. The Teifi has some big fish but the average size is much smaller. As Marty says you get at least a couple of strains of fish in the same river. I am not a C &R proponent but look after the big hens.
There was a fairly extensive DNA study done on this some years ago and I thought that was the conclusion but I could be wrong!

The Taw has a pretty decent run of large sea trout, The Exe, which rises a stones throw away, has virtually none. There is a simelar situation on the NC of Scotland. The Hope and West have huge Sea Trout runs but the rivers to the East have very few outside the tidal reaches.
 

Loxie

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Surely that depends on the quality of coastal food source ?
I think the faster growing types travel much further but it was a while ago I read the research and I can't remember the details.
 

salarchaser

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Biggest Ive had was arround 5lb.
It was on a 8.5 foot #4 though.
Took some stopping.

Picking up on some other comments I was intreagued when I found from these pages that many big tweed seatrout are maiden fish.

As for multiple spawners I know there have been a few in the high teens through the trap on the Welsh Dee at Chester, some of them over a 6 years period. They use UV tags behind the eye.
 

SOS

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The average weight of Seatrout on the rivers Dee, Don and Ythan is between 2 and 3 pounds, and my biggest is 6lb off the Don which would be classed as a good seatrout.
I have read that the Seatrout of the south east Scotland and the North east England tend to migrate further out to sea and stay at sea longer than most other rivers, which is why they are bigger.
It would be interesting to know if the rivers with big seatrout also have a strong run of finnock?
I have also read that finnock are the grilse of the seatrout, but I doubt that because,
(1) I have never caught a finnock kelt
(2) Although I have caught many many finnock in the Don estuary I could count on one hand how many finnock I have caught up river, but yet on the Ythan only a few miles north the finnock are caught well up river at the start of the season.

The more I think about Seatrout the more I realise they are complex creatures with many different genetic strains.
 
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