Best rod type for trotting and float fishing the worm

Gilamator

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Worm Trotting Rods

I’m well aware this has probably been done to death before, although I can’t find a definitive response.

Im looking for a recommendation for the best type of rod for trotting the worm for sea trout, and fishing the worm under the float for Grayling.

Ive been using a 9’ spinning rod but have found it too short and fast actioned, making it difficult to feel for bites.

Should I be looking at “Match” rods, “Barbel” rods, “Avon” rods...?

Thanks
Andrew
 

SteveG

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Worm Trotting Rods

I’m well aware this has probably been done to death before, although I can’t find a definitive response.

Im looking for a recommendation for the best type of rod for trotting the worm for sea trout, and fishing the worm under the float for Grayling.

Ive been using a 9’ spinning rod but have found it too short and fast actioned, making it difficult to feel for bites.

Should I be looking at “Match” rods, “Barbel” rods, “Avon” rods...?

Thanks
Andrew
Personally I always use an old 13ft spliced tip match rod l, I’ve got an old Fibatube that I purchased 34 years ago that’s my go to rod but it’s just about to be rebuilt as I broke and eye a couple of weeks ago, So at the moment it will be a

I’ve had plenty of sea trout over the years on it in the summer months floating a worm and even had carp to 13lb on that set up all that changes is the hook length and hook
Cheers
Steve
 

Treecutter

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I've got a Harrison Killin Stick nice rod but also have a Daiwa Tournament Pro Powerfloat which is also upto the job.

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Gilamator

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Forgive my ignorance, but could someone please explain the difference between the different type of coarse rods? ie March rod vs Float rod vs Carp rod vs ledger rod etc
 

Rrrr

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Forgive my ignorance, but could someone please explain the difference between the different type of coarse rods? ie March rod vs Float rod vs Carp rod vs ledger rod etc
Casting weight usualy. Also an avon rod or ledger rod will have a tip for bite indication.

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Rrrr

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I used to use a tricast triune dutch feeder rod. Its got a quiver tip on so nice and soft but enough power in the middle and lower sections as its designed to lob big feeders across large rivers in europe. Cant remember the length off hand but its got an extension section of about 18 inches to make it longer. Not made for the job in the slightest but worked quite well.

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SteveG

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Forgive my ignorance, but could someone please explain the difference between the different type of coarse rods? ie March rod vs Float rod vs Carp rod vs ledger rod etc
As stated casting weight and action is the main difference

To me a match rod is normally a float rod, some like me prefer a spliced fibre glass tip version rather than a full carbon as I think it helps with hook pulls when long trotting for Graying but like I say personal preference.

Avon rod is more like a match rod on steroids quite good for targeting bigger fish

Carp rod tends to be quite powerful but again you can get different test curves, often used with nite alarms so the tip doesn’t need to register a bite, like a feeder rod as the bite alarm works on line movement.

this is however a lot more info than your initial posted question 😂 and could go on forever
 

Gilamator

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Many thanks for all the answers. I was initially looking at purchasing a “barbel rod”, but now I think I should probably be focusing more on a match rod!!
 

SteveG

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Many thanks for all the answers. I was initially looking at purchasing a “barbel rod”, but now I think I should probably be focusing more on a match rod!!
Barbel rod would be too much for the grayling fishing, the right match rod will have plenty of power for a sea trout, I’ve got a Drennan barbel specialist that I would consider using for floating a shrimp for salmon as they have plenty of power thats with an 8oz tip fitted which makes it more like an strong Avon rod

I do tend to like to use a lighter set up and get a good bend in the rod tho as I said it’s personal choice, tight lines
Steve
 

Isisalar

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For sea Trout and Grayling a match or float rod will be fine. There's a lot of choice ranging from £40 - £300. To me one of the most important things in a float rod is the weight. Bear in mind that you'll be holding it all day.
I'm currently using a Drennan Acolyte Plus which I would say is just about as close to perfect as you'll get. The Plus is for heavier hook links, say 4-7lb, the Ultra for 2-3lb. The float range goes from 12'- 17' between £200 and £300ish. They're all VERY light.
If you're wading or otherwise not casting far there's nothing better than a centerpin reel to go with it.
 

SteveG

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For sea Trout and Grayling a match or float rod will be fine. There's a lot of choice ranging from £40 - £300. To me one of the most important things in a float rod is the weight. Bear in mind that you'll be holding it all day.
I'm currently using a Drennan Acolyte Plus which I would say is just about as close to perfect as you'll get. The Plus is for heavier hook links, say 4-7lb, the Ultra for 2-3lb. The float range goes from 12'- 17' between £200 and £300ish. They're all VERY light.
If you're wading or otherwise not casting far there's nothing better than a centerpin reel to go with it.
Love the centre pin idea but I just couldn’t get away with it, they look so much nicer that the fixed spool, a sea trout on a centre pin would be a hoot
 

iainmortimer

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For sea Trout and Grayling a match or float rod will be fine. There's a lot of choice ranging from £40 - £300. To me one of the most important things in a float rod is the weight. Bear in mind that you'll be holding it all day.
I'm currently using a Drennan Acolyte Plus which I would say is just about as close to perfect as you'll get. The Plus is for heavier hook links, say 4-7lb, the Ultra for 2-3lb. The float range goes from 12'- 17' between £200 and £300ish. They're all VERY light.
If you're wading or otherwise not casting far there's nothing better than a centerpin reel to go with it.

Good advice right there. If you get a longer version you will find the line control is much better which can be very helpful as you can control the float better without dragging it off line - it can also make a great dapping rod if you ever want to try method. I'd suggest no less than 13' for a float rod - another reason for wanting something light and well balanced.
 
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I bought two greys toreon tactical float rods last year to trot and freeline for salmon/sea trout on small rivers, 10'6" 1lb tc and 11'6" 1.25lb tc. I've not used the 11'6" yet but have trotted and freelined with the 10'6" rod, picked up a 2lb trout and got an idea of what the rod can do but have not had a salmon on it yet. For freelining and trotting it's a cracking wee tool for smaller rivers and burns, the tip is sensitive enough for freelining and the lower rod feels powerfull enough to handle large fish. I would recomend it highly but it might be a bit too short for your rivers.
 

Bullet

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Another vote for the Acolyte plus, I have several, and they're just as at home catching grayling as they are big Chub and Barbel. My personal favourite is the 13 ft compact. The 12ft Carp Waggler is also an excellent trotting rod, don't be put off by the name.
Why couldn't you get away with a 'Pin?
 

Isisalar

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Mine's the 13' compact too. What a brilliant idea. I've also got a Carp Waggler which is the same compact design and is used for trotting shrimps and prawns. I think Salmon on the Acolyte would be taking things a bit too far.
 
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