B&W Carbon Expert - what line to use

Linloskin

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Gents, and ladies,
Friend of mine has just taken up salmon fishing on the fly. He has got himself a B&W Carbon Expert 15' #9/11 - 3 piece
I have no experience of this rod so not really able to help him on which lines he should try on it - and what weight/size

He has a trip coming up in early June to Tweed and would like to use it then. He would like a mutli tip line so he can change his fishing depth - so floating head with tips if this would suit the rod. Because I don't know the rod I am unable to help him with the style/profile of line - spey, skagit, scandi.
He is just starting out so my guess is he would find it easier with a scandi type setup - but don't know if this would suit the rod - and also what weight/size of line

Any help would be much appreciated

Cheers

LL
 

Richardgw

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Gents, and ladies,
Friend of mine has just taken up salmon fishing on the fly. He has got himself a B&W Carbon Expert 15' #9/11 - 3 piece
I have no experience of this rod so not really able to help him on which lines he should try on it - and what weight/size

He has a trip coming up in early June to Tweed and would like to use it then. He would like a mutli tip line so he can change his fishing depth - so floating head with tips if this would suit the rod. Because I don't know the rod I am unable to help him with the style/profile of line - spey, skagit, scandi.
He is just starting out so my guess is he would find it easier with a scandi type setup - but don't know if this would suit the rod - and also what weight/size of line

Any help would be much appreciated

Cheers

LL

That is an old rod from the 1980s in their budget range. I had one for a very short time but changed it for a 15ft Walker. My limited experience was of a slow through action rod where you could feel the rod load and unload. For me it put out a reasonable line for those times. I think I tried it with a DT9F but it was a very long time ago and both rods and lines have come on by leaps and bounds since.

My thoughts would be for your friend to move it on and replace it with something more modern rather than try to match it with an expensive multi tip line.

Alternatively could you let him try it with some of your lines of different weights BEFORE his trip and see how it goes.
 

tenet

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There's a blast from the past - have one in the loft gathering dust. As has been said a slow thru action rod which back in the day (pre spey lines et al) was used with a double taper wt10 line. Not sure (can't remember) if the line weight guide was for salmon rating or trout rating, have a feeling it might be trout rating given the vintage, others may know.
 

gordyT8

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Used this exact rod for years before selling it for about the same as I originally paid! Highly robust and dependable workhorse.
What you should definitely avoid is a shooting head - just not suitable. Although rated 9-11, for speycasting I always found the #11 worked better.
Similar to others of course, most of my fishing with this rod was by way of a DT #11 full floater, which was very pleasant to use, albeit pretty heavy by today's standards.
Given that a DT is virtually prehistoric now, a shortish head #10/11 Spey line would suit, say around the 55ft mark.
One other thing to watch though is the reel fitting - it's a sliding collar rather than a screw type, which does not suit some of the modern day reels too well. Once secured, put a couple of wraps of insulating tape around the collar for added security!
Good luck,
Gordy
 

Elibank

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Used this exact rod for years before selling it for about the same as I originally paid! Highly robust and dependable workhorse.
What you should definitely avoid is a shooting head - just not suitable. Although rated 9-11, for speycasting I always found the #11 worked better.
Similar to others of course, most of my fishing with this rod was by way of a DT #11 full floater, which was very pleasant to use, albeit pretty heavy by today's standards.
Given that a DT is virtually prehistoric now, a shortish head #10/11 Spey line would suit, say around the 55ft mark.
One other thing to watch though is the reel fitting - it's a sliding collar rather than a screw type, which does not suit some of the modern day reels too well. Once secured, put a couple of wraps of insulating tape around the collar for added security!
Good luck,
Gordy
DT prehistoric? How very dare you.....
 

allysshrimp

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I used this rod for years. I worked very well with DT 10 lines as previously mentioned.
Latterly I used an Airflo Quick Spey Multi Tip, and it handled the line well.

The very rod in the pic.
 

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ibm59

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I used this rod for years. I worked very well with DT 10 lines as previously mentioned.
Latterly I used an Airflo Quick Spey Multi Tip, and it handled the line well.

The very rod in the pic.

That fish looks dead.
Absolutely shocking














:D
 

onelastcast

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line match

Going off memory here which could interesting ,but I think a #8-9 airflo delta spey or 8-9 rio afs went well on this rod using more bottom hand to put the power in and the lines cast very well, a bit slower and heavier than modern rods ,but if it was my only rod I would get a feel for it and use it had many happy hours and salmon on my old expert onelastcast
 
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