Are lobs to big

Stuart1108

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Are lobs to big for salmon fishing never seem to have any luck on them and they cost a fortune.
i usualy fish 3 to a hook one up the line one on hook one dangling down. fish on the bottom and also try them on a float with a 6ft dropper when theres not much current.
what is everyone preferd worm for salmon fishing.
 

Rosslinden0

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No they're not to big, if its the bag from GAC imo their over priced pish if i cant be bothered digging blackheads ill just order a few hundred dendrobaenas from yorkshire worms, remember when hooking them you want lots of heeds and tails
 

Andy R

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Bog standard garden lobs aren't that good, you want the blue heads ( some call then black heads) that live under cowpats..... find a field and fork over a slightly aged cowpat. Get the farmers permission first, and tread back in the earth you've dug up, preferably the right way up.

After rain you can get them on the surface at night with a torch, once you've trapped them pull sideways and they'll let go and you can pull them out. However I think it does strain them.....they don't keep as well as dug ones.

For seatrout one worm, cover the hook. For salmon two or three ( dependent on size) for salmon use circle hooks- very efficient hookers in the scissors with no deep hooking. Seatrout you hit them on the second good rattle- so less of a concern.
 
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PerryPoker

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I remember fishing the Tay a number of years ago and watching the ghillie rig up his worming set up. His set up taught me a lot about how I fished the worm and I have used his method ever since that day. He just threaded the top 10-15mm of a single worm up the hook onto the line and left the rest dangling along with the exposed hook. We caught fish and had numerous contacts. All using just the solitary lob worm. It's deadly and very efficient if you hit the fish early enough as it is always well hooked in the front of the mouth and it makes you worms much longer.
 
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Rrrr

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I use lobs for salmon late season. 1 big lob hooked twice or 2 smaller ones.

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Stuart1108

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No they're not to big, if its the bag from GAC imo their over priced pish if i cant be bothered digging blackheads ill just order a few hundred dendrobaenas from yorkshire worms, remember when hooking them you want lots of heeds and tails

Yeah it was mate ma local shop was out of them and they are long and hardly move at all literally fished a 3 mile stretch through every pool and never touched a thing maybe its just me tho lol are the dendros effective also
 

Scrummatron

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Bog standard garden lobs aren't that good, you want the blue heads ( some call then black heads) that live under cowpats..... find a field and fork over a slightly aged cowpat. Get the farmers permission first, and tread back in the earth you've dug up, preferably the right way up.

After rain you can get them on the surface at night with a torch, once you've trapped them pull sideways and they'll let go and you can pull them out. However I think it does strain them.....they don't keep as well as dug ones.

For seatrout one worm, cover the hook. For salmon two or three ( dependent on size) for salmon use circle hooks- very efficient hookers in the scissors with no deep hooking. Seatrout you hit them on the second good rattle- so less of a concern.

All this is great advice,and is exactly similar to my own experience in west of Ireland,..
The easiest way to collect black/blue heads,...(and they're more deadly version,.the purple head and pure pink/white body) in urban areas is along any path that's sided by a bank of earth,...and especially where the earth is grown on to the path (then u don't need to dig,just pull it up.
Or if the path is maintained,Where the grass meets the path,slide a spade down along the side and get a good sod up..then keep goin along the side of the path.
Replace the sods after and in a week there'll be more there.
Paths that are in low lieing areas,or that have poor drainage or pool with water when it rains are the best by far.

However,when I say urban,I mean west of Ireland urban,...so it's never too far from some cow pats;)

Also,crush up a half red brick into dust and gravel,(old red brick,not the new kind)and keep them in that,with some moss,...
..water every couple of days and change moss when they shat in it.

After a few days,these worms literally live 2-3 times longer when hooked,kick like mules in the water and if u hook them properly,don't die for ages.

As for using them,only in very heavy water would I bother with a weight,..and more water,means use more worms,...
Usually a shot or 2 is plenty,and if water is low,just a swivel..and 1 worm is enough,popped up off the bottom with something small,red and buoyant in front of it.

In my experience,salmon very rarely take a static worm,unless there's a few of them sniffing and a brave one amongst them.
They always grab it on the move,so when bait settles,only leave it for 20-30 seconds,the lift and let it flow.
This is when they take mostly.
(After that time,any salmon that's gona take it,likely would have,and so eels or brown trout,or worse is 99% more likely to get on it)
Of course sea trout will take when on the bottom,but they're just as likely to eat the little fingerlings that gather around it than the actual worm.

This salmon trotting can be tough to master on rocky bottom rivers,but with little weight you won't lose many hooks.

throwing out some worms and waiting for an Irish salmon to find them on the bottom is a 100/1 or worse shot and a waste of valuable fishing time in my humble opinion.


This is all relevant to Ireland only,but maybe useful to someone.:)

Twice before I've caught salmon on a practically bare hook while worm fishing and seen them take it both times,....
It usually competition from another salmon that makes them grab it,or even the hook where there "used to be" worms.....
and I've seen 4 fish chase a bunch of worms down the river and proceed to start a brawl amongst themselves over them,...with the victor returning to sit beside the worms,and as soon as I lifted from the bottom and he thought it was going somewhere,he snapped up the spoils.

Seen similar bullying many times before,and while Obviously u wouldn't be able to observe this "natural" behaviour in most places,..
salmon are salmon,..just like pike are pike,..and so I'd imagine it's similar in most rivers.
 
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Fall prince

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No they're not to big, if its the bag from GAC imo their over priced pish if i cant be bothered digging blackheads ill just order a few hundred dendrobaenas from yorkshire worms, remember when hooking them you want lots of heeds and tails
What your preference for hiking them?
 

Fall prince

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I remember fishing the Tay a number of years ago and watching the ghillie rig up his worming set up. His set up taught me a lot about how I fished the worm and I have used his method ever since that day. He just threaded the top 10-15mm of a single worm up the hook onto the line and left the rest dangling along with the exposed hook. We caught fish and had numerous contacts. All using just the solitary lob worm. It's deadly and very efficient if you hit the fish early enough as it is always well hooked in the front of the mouth and it makes you worms much longer.
Wow fantastic! So threading the “top” refers to the head of the worm? I’d love to see a pic to make sure I have the rigging right.
 

Fall prince

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No they're not to big, if its the bag from GAC imo their over priced pish if i cant be bothered digging blackheads ill just order a few hundred dendrobaenas from yorkshire worms, remember when hooking them you want lots of heeds and tails
What do you mean by “lots if heeds and tails.”?
 

Rosslinden0

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What do you mean by “lots if heeds and tails.”?
20210210_155017.jpg
Sorry at work and not able to use worms till may on my system so a rubbish drawing will have to do lol
Hook above the thick band on the worm and thread the hook down the worm and pop out below it, do that with 2 or 3 worms and you have a ball with lots of loose worm wriggling about.
 

brumyterry

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If you need to know anything about Worms for Salmon fishing ,Speak to Gordon at BAITLINE .He will be able to help you. He has been supplying, and fishing [very successfully ] with Lobworms and Dendrabena`s for 35 years
 

Wee Porters

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What do you mean by “lots if heeds and tails.”?

Maybe on about the world coin tossing championships. :unsure: :D

Joking aside, never been keen on lobs for fishing, much prefer the "black heads" find them far tougher.

Lots of different ways and hook set ups to fish the worm, locally when I was younger most fished a 2 hook set up
with the hooks 2" apart, nowadays it's mostly a single hook and the number of worms varying due to the river conditions.
 

Fall prince

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View attachment 56847
Sorry at work and not able to use worms till may on my system so a rubbish drawing will have to do lol
Hook above the thick band on the worm and thread the hook down the worm and pop out below it, do that with 2 or 3 worms and you have a ball with lots of loose worm wriggling about.
Absolutely fantastic! Wow can’t wait to try that !! Thank you so much 😊
 
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