Any Other Problems?

chriswjx

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So, I'm a fair beginner at this casting malarkey, having just had a casting lesson and the odd day with my switch rod on the River Almond in Edinburgh. Currently, I'm trying to develop my ability to shoot line in preparation for my first trip (all things willing) to the Tay at the end of April.

However, I'm noticing that whilst I can cast the full width of the Almond with my right hand up and still get a wee tug at the reel as it lands. When I cast with my left hand up, I'm lucky if the line barely tickles the same distance, and the feel I get is that I'm not loading the rod fully.

Hopefully, I have a lesson booked with Eoin Fairgrieve at the start of April were I can get an expert eye on it. But between then, I'm wanting to try and work on it myself. Currently, I'm of the mind that

1) I'm not pausing enough on the backstroke.

2) there might be a small amount of creep in the delivery? But I don't think/feel that's the case.

3) Definitely the odd case of rogue tracking every few casts, as it doesn't always lay straight.

Anyone have any other possible faults that it might be? And any advice on how to correct them?

Figure it's just practice practice practice, but if there's something that I can be incorporating that reduces the likelihood of me ingraining bad habits I'm all for it.

Odd thing is, I'm left hand dominant and I guess I case of forcing the cast might be an issue to?

Cheers

Chris
 

chriswjx

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Okay, what with the latest from the Scottish Gov. that casting lesson isn't likely to happen.

Back to asking for any suggestions on what practices/exercises I can do to focus on the above faults? I'm still planning to go into the water, and with the way things are currently going, waiting till I'm allowed to have another lesson isn't really practical.
 

Rrrr

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I cant cast at all left hand up. I find it alot easier to cast off the other shoulder and crossed if its due to the wind.
Otherwise i prefer a double spey or snake roll depending which line im using.
Id see whats suggested in the lesson.

Sent from my SM-G981B using Tapatalk
 

chriswjx

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The most confusing thing for me is that I'm left hand dominant, and cast my SH rods with my left hand (woe betide anything within about 20 yds of me if I tried to cast with my right hand).

And yet when it comes to DH, casting with RHU virtually pings the line out, but with LHU, its much a struggle... With lessons unlikely to be till May (or later depending on travel restrictions, as I would need to go someway to get to the tweed, where the instructor runs his stuff) that's a long time to wait, especially if I am to stay off the water to avoid bad habits...

Hence why I was hoping someone else might have been recommended a practice/exercise or something to go specifically for the flaws that I'm fairly sure I have (as these are what were listed as common faults when I had my first lesson, where I actually learned to cast DH from scratch. The creep/crossing was definitely listed by the instructor then, but nothing really apart from just practice practice practice recommended to solve it)
 

Jer

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Generally.... it is found with a single handed caster when they progress to a double handed technique all the "memory" they have in the single handed cast gets transferred to their dominant upper hand in the double handed cast... I say generally where perhaps the single handed caster hasn't had lessons such that their single handed cast isn't as proficient as it could be.... if there are bad habits they get transferred on to the double handed cast for that dominant side

However... when practising or casting with the non dominant side those ingrained habits aren't transferred and again "generally" at least at the start the non dominant cast is performed with better efficiency

Good videos to watch include those done by Robert Gillespie... MiniTube on this Forum... look him up on YouTube.... The Incline exercises are very good to watch... especially if you slow the playback speed down... watch his hand positions.... watch his rod positions.... watch how he picks up, and sweeps the line maintaining constant tension using leverage generated at the appropriate time concluding with Anchor placement and D Loop formation to the key position.... before commencing his forward casts.... watch where his hands and elbows are and how constant they are and watch the angle change of the rod... and then stand in front of your laptop and practice with the butt of your rod to try and establish if you're casting stroke can be improved... from what you are saying you are losing line tension... which is fundamental throughout the casting stroke... beginning to end... the videos are high quality from an expert in his field... but I stress watch in slow motion

Spey casting is simple... we tend to think there are a whole load of line movements when usually there are not... but it relies on adherence to the underlying 5 principles... No Slack Line.... Straight Line Path of Rod Tip... Casting Arc proportionate to weight of line outside of the rod tip... Pause at the end of each back and forward cast (Overhead and if you want V Loops on the Back Spey Casts or if you have a Skagit set up).... Smooth/Progressive application of Power(?)/Force in the casting stroke to a firm stop

It also relies on good style.... but that's another days work... and it is delicate and fine tuned.... with the rod doing the work through correct manipulation by the caster... the line being a long and flexible weight

I also suggest you video yourself to see how your casting stroke differs on each side which may help with seeing what is fundamentally different left and right hand up

And when you get your casting lesson with Eoin ask him if you can shoot a video of him showing you how he builds up the exercises to perform the cast he is showing you.... you can play these back to yourself later and maybe practice in slow motion in front of a laptop to reinforce the correct casting procedure using a slow motion video playback such as elmedia

Hope this helps.... overall the route through the instructor is the best way but I understand in lock down times how we would like to be doing some practising

Ger
 
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bassfly

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The most confusing thing for me is that I'm left hand dominant, and cast my SH rods with my left hand (woe betide anything within about 20 yds of me if I tried to cast with my right hand).

And yet when it comes to DH, casting with RHU virtually pings the line out, but with LHU, its much a struggle... With lessons unlikely to be till May (or later depending on travel restrictions, as I would need to go someway to get to the tweed, where the instructor runs his stuff) that's a long time to wait, especially if I am to stay off the water to avoid bad habits...

Hence why I was hoping someone else might have been recommended a practice/exercise or something to go specifically for the flaws that I'm fairly sure I have (as these are what were listed as common faults when I had my first lesson, where I actually learned to cast DH from scratch. The creep/crossing was definitely listed by the instructor then, but nothing really apart from just practice practice practice recommended to solve it)
I’m left handed on all things single handed, trout rod, bowling of any kind, writing, fly tying with vice the wrong way round, but right handed on all thing that use two hands, golf, cricket bat etc.
I have had casting lessons for a number of years and when being taught left hand up I had problems with the control of the rod, hands to far away from the body, uncontrolled d loop and forward stop, and after being given tips from my instructor the cast became a little easier. Once you can understand what you are doing wrong then it is a little easier to correct it.
But there is one thing that will help more than anything and that’s practice, practice, practice.
When I had a fishing trip I would always make time to use the rod with just left hand up for at least a morning and this has payed off.
The problem as I see it is to teach your body muscle memory and the more you practice the more it becomes natural.
I don’t even have to think about it now and my left hand up is as natural as my right had up.
 
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Rennie

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I am abso flaming sodding U.S. less with my left hand side, can barely pick my nose or scratch my bum.I do all my casting right hand up, but simply swop shoulder's. Much to my own amazement I find I cast best right hand up from my left shoulder on the right hand bank of rivers.Any cast, any wind, it just bombs out good stylee.
In theory I should be just as good from the left hand bank with my right hand dominate from my right hand shoulder, but sadly its not quite the same.
Last year I started to set myself a goal of at least trying to gain mastery with my left hand uppermost, so I swop banks more than I used to and instead of just thrashing about,I'm actually trying to work out what I do when it go's right and what actually happens when it dosen't.
I've found that of all the casts the Double Spey is a cast that can be more easily understood and because you've more time( it is a sustained anchor cast after all!) it's easier to work it all out step by step.
I'd agree 100% some form of tuition is the way to go, but don't expect miracles from the word go.A good teacher will merely show you the path you should be walking, it'll be up to you to learn it and teach yourself.
May I suggest casting video's- the Michael Evans one, in particular his jump roll cast sorted the way for me in progressing.There's some excellent clips on here from many other people too, I concur heartily with anything by Mini Tube- Robert Gillespie, he has a unique way of understanding Salmon fly casting and has an insight few of we lessor mortals will ever comprehend.
If I can make one suggestion, as I was first told, stand in the water, face directly downstream perhaps knee deep with your kit fully set up, then simply roll cast your full shooting head (or the belly of your Spey profile line) without shooting line 6 times off your right hand, then 6 times off your left hand, and repeat!. Spend ages doing that until it feels the same to you no matter which hand up or shoulder you use, you want a fishing cast, no noise or splashes, you want every thing out nice n straight n gentle.
It won't happen overnight or within 6 casts off each shoulder, but keep at it for some time.When you feel confident, then move onto trying shoot line and so on.
There's so much to learn and many influences that can affect the outcome of successful Salmon fly casting.
I wish you nobbut good luck, it is possible, it won't come easy (it never does) but practise, practise , practise won't do you any harm at all.
Pedro.
 

firefly

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I found that mirroring muscle memory was best done by practising "switch" casts, switching the rod from shoulder to shoulder with the line still in the air. The speed of adjustment helps to position the rod and hands without having to think about it. It becomes a natural movement.... after a lot of practise.
 

chriswjx

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Thanks for all the advice! Will get onto YouTube now, picked up a fair bit of my casting (prior to my first lesson) from all the Rio videos. Problem is any time I search for a casting video now, that's all the algorithms show me 😂
 

bassfly

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I am abso flaming sodding U.S. less with my left hand side, can barely pick my nose or scratch my bum.I do all my casting right hand up, but simply swop shoulder's. Much to my own amazement I find I cast best right hand up from my left shoulder on the right hand bank of rivers.Any cast, any wind, it just bombs out good stylee.
In theory I should be just as good from the left hand bank with my right hand dominate from my right hand shoulder, but sadly its not quite the same.
Last year I started to set myself a goal of at least trying to gain mastery with my left hand uppermost, so I swop banks more than I used to and instead of just thrashing about,I'm actually trying to work out what I do when it go's right and what actually happens when it dosen't.
I've found that of all the casts the Double Spey is a cast that can be more easily understood and because you've more time( it is a sustained anchor cast after all!) it's easier to work it all out step by step.
I'd agree 100% some form of tuition is the way to go, but don't expect miracles from the word go.A good teacher will merely show you the path you should be walking, it'll be up to you to learn it and teach yourself.
May I suggest casting video's- the Michael Evans one, in particular his jump roll cast sorted the way for me in progressing.There's some excellent clips on here from many other people too, I concur heartily with anything by Mini Tube- Robert Gillespie, he has a unique way of understanding Salmon fly casting and has an insight few of we lessor mortals will ever comprehend.
If I can make one suggestion, as I was first told, stand in the water, face directly downstream perhaps knee deep with your kit fully set up, then simply roll cast your full shooting head (or the belly of your Spey profile line) without shooting line 6 times off your right hand, then 6 times off your left hand, and repeat!. Spend ages doing that until it feels the same to you no matter which hand up or shoulder you use, you want a fishing cast, no noise or splashes, you want every thing out nice n straight n gentle.
It won't happen overnight or within 6 casts off each shoulder, but keep at it for some time.When you feel confident, then move onto trying shoot line and so on.
There's so much to learn and many influences that can affect the outcome of successful Salmon fly casting.
I wish you nobbut good luck, it is possible, it won't come easy (it never does) but practise, practise , practise won't do you any harm at all.
Pedro.
I think the reason casting off the left shoulder , right hand up, gives you a better cast is the fact that you are restricting the amount the rod can go back over the shoulder and giving you a much more punchy cast.
 
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