Ammo.

Bushwhacker

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Bought a new rifle from a mate for the Bunnies but can,t get the ammo for it.
I think it may be a little over the top for them as it says .50 on the empty casing that came with the gun.:D


Picture 027.jpg

Actually,i found this on the river bed while fishing the tidal pools on the Wear a few years back.
How the hell it got there i,l never know.
At first i thought it may have been 2nd WW,but after some research going off what is written on the rim,i found it was made by this company in 1962.
They kindly replied to an email i sent them about it.

About Kynoch ammunition for big game rifles
 
D

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That why there are no more Elephants in Sunderland!!!
 

Jockiescott

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Maybe there from the days when you were allowed to shoot Mergansers etc. :rolleyes: :eek:

What a find! :cool:
 

Rrrr

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Bought a new rifle from a mate for the Bunnies but can,t get the ammo for it.
I think it may be a little over the top for them as it says .50 on the empty casing that came with the gun.:D


View attachment 18122

Actually,i found this on the river bed while fishing the tidal pools on the Wear a few years back.
How the hell it got there i,l never know.
At first i thought it may have been 2nd WW,but after some research going off what is written on the rim,i found it was made by this company in 1962.
They kindly replied to an email i sent them about it.

About Kynoch ammunition for big game rifles
From a drive by in roker maybe ?

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
 

MCXFisher

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That round was used for the range finding gun mounted on top of the barrel of the 120mm recoilless anti-tank guns issued to infantry battalions between 1956 and 1975.

It may also have been used in the ranging gun fitted coaxially in the Centurion tank from the Mark V onwards.
 
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That round was used for the range finding gun mounted on top of the barrel of the 120mm recoilless anti-tank guns issued to infantry battalions between 1956 and 1975.

It may also have been used in the ranging gun fitted coaxially in the Centurion tank from the Mark V onwards.

I don't suppose you know the name of the guy that fired it do you??:rolleyes::rolleyes::D:D;);)
 

Hemmy

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That round was used for the range finding gun mounted on top of the barrel of the 120mm recoilless anti-tank guns issued to infantry battalions between 1956 and 1975.

It may also have been used in the ranging gun fitted coaxially in the Centurion tank from the Mark V onwards.

They really knew how to deal with seals and cormorants in those days.....no messing :rolleyes:
 

Tyke

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That round was used for the range finding gun mounted on top of the barrel of the 120mm recoilless anti-tank guns issued to infantry battalions between 1956 and 1975.

It may also have been used in the ranging gun fitted coaxially in the Centurion tank from the Mark V onwards.


And to TA infantry battalions after that, I remember my old unit certainly used them in 1978/79.

I can still remember the blast out of the rear Venturi tube when we fired them at Otterburn Ranges - you definitely didn't want to be standing 10 yards behind it unless you were really bored with life!....

They did indeed have a .50 cal ranging gun firing a tracer round with the same trajectory as the main round.

Regards, Tyke.
 

MCXFisher

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The dangers of over-age ammunition. Two things happen in extended storage. First, nitro-glycerin migration between elements of the propellant and indeed, also out of the prills or flakes to the surface of the case. And second, the prills or flakes break down and become fragile. When the primer goes off, the shock wave may cause uncontrolled break up of the propellant leading to a massive increase in the burning surface area and as a result, a catastrophic rise in breech pressure to far above design limits.

This phenomenon is not restricted to exotic large calibre weapons, although of course the risks are greatest in high pressure regimes. My brother destroyed an otherwise serviceable 12 bore Grant sidelock with over-age ammunition that had been badly stored. The barrel ruptured just forward of his left hand.

The warning to all of us is clear.
 
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