Advice on unusual situation

jonas_palekas

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Hey there,

Wanted to ask for advice regarding fishing in my home river - Neris. Some other rivers might have similar conditions too. I will try to explain the situation.

We have late springer season with very high water temperatures every year. 17c or above. It’s more like summer run actually. River is deep and not the fastest one. This year water is not just warm, but coloured and quite high too. Salmon is known to be in the river, but since water is warm and their journey was long (we are fishing pools about 300km from the sea) we do not expect them to be eager to take any fly. What approach would you recommend? Worth sinking? And what about fly size and choice?

I hope some one will have something too say.

Best wishes
j.
 

Hardyreels

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I'm not fishing for Atlantic Salmon here but you mentioned 'Color' in the water. Although our Pacific salmon are quite different than your fish they are still fish and when the water gets to the point where standing in 2 foot of water I can't see my feet I consider fishing a lost cause. I'm not going to say that a salmon can't be captured in such water but we have to put a fly almost on the nose of the fish in order for it to be seen. Unless the pool or run is absolutely crammed with salmon this on the nose business can lead to a very long day.

I have 2 rivers within a reasonable drive, one is fed by snow melt and glacial melt in the mountains and the other by wetland drainage. The glacial river has fish and big fish however the color is so high as I write I haven't bothered trying it yet this year. It will eventually clear up but when is the question? The river fed by wetland drainage is a tea color much like many of your rivers and visibility stays good even when it's high but it can warm quickly. The fish run smaller in this river but for now it is my destination. Based on what I deal with here and what you wrote I'd be traveling to a nice tannin colored river to do my fishing for now.
 

Auldghillie

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I'm not fishing for Atlantic Salmon here but you mentioned 'Color' in the water. Although our Pacific salmon are quite different than your fish they are still fish and when the water gets to the point where standing in 2 foot of water I can't see my feet I consider fishing a lost cause. I'm not going to say that a salmon can't be captured in such water but we have to put a fly almost on the nose of the fish in order for it to be seen. Unless the pool or run is absolutely crammed with salmon this on the nose business can lead to a very long day.

I have 2 rivers within a reasonable drive, one is fed by snow melt and glacial melt in the mountains and the other by wetland drainage. The glacial river has fish and big fish however the color is so high as I write I haven't bothered trying it yet this year. It will eventually clear up but when is the question? The river fed by wetland drainage is a tea color much like many of your rivers and visibility stays good even when it's high but it can warm quickly. The fish run smaller in this river but for now it is my destination. Based on what I deal with here and what you wrote I'd be traveling to a nice tannin colored river to do my fishing for now.
It’s all about the lies Salmon take up at particular heights in my experience. In the U.K., in around 95% of rivers, flow rate allows fish to be caught in the main current up to heights approx 1’ to 1’ 6” above summer level. Thereafter it’s wise to look for resting lies fish may take up during runnning.

In comparison, taking Alta as an opposite example, salmon lie often on the inside of bends out of the main flow.

As to turbidity, here we usually try fly if we can see the fly at 1’ depth. On our biggest rivers there is often one day post a flood that only spinning will work or possibly the upside down fly might get a pull.
 

Richardgw

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Deep canal like rivers - sounds like Denmark. These might help - depth and movement to both fly and lure.


 

rotenone

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Franc and snaelda or snaelda or Francis flies fished on a skagit, deep but with enough speed
 

goosander

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Hey there,

Wanted to ask for advice regarding fishing in my home river - Neris. Some other rivers might have similar conditions too. I will try to explain the situation.

We have late springer season with very high water temperatures every year. 17c or above. It’s more like summer run actually. River is deep and not the fastest one. This year water is not just warm, but coloured and quite high too. Salmon is known to be in the river, but since water is warm and their journey was long (we are fishing pools about 300km from the sea) we do not expect them to be eager to take any fly. What approach would you recommend? Worth sinking? And what about fly size and choice?

I hope some one will have something too say.

Best wishes
j.
Where about are you.
Bob.
 

salarchaser

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I'm not fishing for Atlantic Salmon here but you mentioned 'Color' in the water. Although our Pacific salmon are quite different than your fish they are still fish and when the water gets to the point where standing in 2 foot of water I can't see my feet I consider fishing a lost cause. I'm not going to say that a salmon can't be captured in such water but we have to put a fly almost on the nose of the fish in order for it to be seen. Unless the pool or run is absolutely crammed with salmon this on the nose business can lead to a very long day.

I have 2 rivers within a reasonable drive, one is fed by snow melt and glacial melt in the mountains and the other by wetland drainage. The glacial river has fish and big fish however the color is so high as I write I haven't bothered trying it yet this year. It will eventually clear up but when is the question? The river fed by wetland drainage is a tea color much like many of your rivers and visibility stays good even when it's high but it can warm quickly. The fish run smaller in this river but for now it is my destination. Based on what I deal with here and what you wrote I'd be traveling to a nice tannin colored river to do my fishing for now.
I was always told visibility should be B&B for fishing the fly.
When you're up to your b@llocks you need to be able to see your boots.
 

Auldghillie

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Hey there,

Wanted to ask for advice regarding fishing in my home river - Neris. Some other rivers might have similar conditions too. I will try to explain the situation.

We have late springer season with very high water temperatures every year. 17c or above. It’s more like summer run actually. River is deep and not the fastest one. This year water is not just warm, but coloured and quite high too. Salmon is known to be in the river, but since water is warm and their journey was long (we are fishing pools about 300km from the sea) we do not expect them to be eager to take any fly. What approach would you recommend? Worth sinking? And what about fly size and choice?

I hope some one will have something too say.

Best wishes
j.
I’ve seen your later post. Put 2 rods up with long belly intermediate and medium sink lines respectively. In the deep pools use the medium and weight the fly according to the current and depth. Try and fish as small as you can using mends if you cannot get deep enough. In the runs switch to the intermediate. I doubt whether you ever need to use a fly less than 25mm. Use some red in the fly if the fish are not fresh. Work the fly in the slower water and handline, strip or back up in very still water. AG
 
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