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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    428

    Default Setting up TFS (Tube Fly System)

    Hi Everyone,

    In response to many questions that Foxy-Tails has received concerning TFS, here comes a presentation on using TFS metal tubes along with TFS soft tubing and FutureFly plastic tubes. It provides some basic techniques so it's rather meant for novice fly tyers. All advice given is based on something I've personally proven to work and it's based on my own tying preferences.

    TFS system has been being developed since 2009 and now offers complete and versatile range of metal tubes and soft tubing that cover most if not all fly fishing conditions for salmon and sea trout worldwide. Foxy-Tails is currently stocking four metal tube families as depicted in photo below:

    tfs-range_taged-jpg

    Click for LARGE photo!

    Foxy-Tails had originally stocked TFS US these tubes but later decided to stock FutureFly US Tubes instead to complete the range of FutureFly products.

    All TFS metal tubes are made of brass and have their bore fully compatible with FutureFly inner plastic tubes and all of them require a liner tube to be installed as shown below:

    rig1_tagged-jpg

    Click for LARGE photo!

    First you cut the inner tube to the length of the metal tube plus at least 1cm excess. Then you melt the back of the inner tube to create solid rim. Metal tube is pushed on the inner tube then locked in front with a few wraps of tying thread. Glue is not required to fix the metal tube and the inner tube, however if the inner and metal tubes have some loose you can tie a base of thread prior to mounting the metal tube. If you plan to use cone head in front of the fly you leave the inner tube as is and do not melt it in front. Otherwise you should melt the front of the inner tube to create a rim that prevents tying thread from slipping off the tube thus allowing the head of the fly to remain as small as possible. The distance from the metal tube to the rim of the inner tube should be measured carefully to accommodate all the materials you plan to tie in. Less experienced tyers may find it easier not to melt this rim in advance sacrificing the size and length of the fly head.

    Compact, Long Range and Skittle tubes are designed for no-body flies. This means you tie dressing on inner plastic tube only but not on metal tube. Of course there are exceptions to this general rule and I find myself the Compact tubes perfect for tying patterns like Frances or Snaelda. Optionally in no-body flies you can add some dressing to metal tubes by either tying in contrasting colour thread, braid or using nail enamel to fill their grooves or by using TFS soft tubing. You can also add a contrasting butt made of a small piece of FutureFly Scandi Outer 3 mm tube.

    contrast-jpg

    Click for LARGE photo!

    Soft tubing can be used in either free swinging hook setup or it can be slid on the metal tube. Therefore TFS soft tubing comes in three diameters, where 2.5mm is used for free swinging hooks, 3.2mm for fixed hook setups and 3mm silicone tubing can be used both for free swinging hooks as well as to put on Compact-13C or Long Range-13 tubes. For free swinging hook the key is to cut the front of soft tubing at the 90 degree angle in order for the hook to be aligned with the axis of the metal tube while fishing. Furthermore, you shouldn't cut the soft tubing too long. Just to cover the hook shank and tippet knot is plenty. This is soft tubing after all and it's prone to flexing over a certain length.

    free-fixed-hook-jpg

    Click for LARGE photo!

    When choosing between free swinging hook and fix hook setup I follow simple rule - whenever I tie wing using soft materials like fox, tanuki I use free swinging hook. When my fly is to have stiffer wing made of boar bristles, bucktail, etc then I prefer to use fixed hook. In times I can't use free swinging hook with soft, long-winged fly then I simply go for fixe double hook instead of a treble.

    All TFS metal tubes except US family are tapered toward the fly head and this tapered part was given an angle that allows for an extra support of the wing which is particularly desirable in Scandi style flies but it also helps to give right body profile of Frances and Snaelda flies.

    Compact tubes are very similar in design to bottle tubes. The only difference is that with Compact tubes materials are tied using plastic inner tube while bottle tubes have their inner part made of metal. They are meant to be fished in free swinging hook setup except Compact-13C variant which has smaller diameter metal butt that allow soft tubing to be put on. All Compact tube sizes have single groove at the back.

    Long Range-13 tubes have similar profile to Compact-13C tubs with a smaller diameter metal butt but at the back. However they are lighter and have four grooves to accent body segmentation of the fly, especially when you insert contrasting colour thread or enamel into the grooves.

    Skittle tubes come only in 13mm length and their design is meant to do just this - quickly bring the fly deep and keep it deep. I guess it's obvious but to make it clear - Skittle tube is to be tied on with the "fat" side pointing toward the head of the fly - you simply want the weight to be placed as much in front as possible. This is particularly helpful when you like to fish deep with floating/intermediate shooting heads.

    US tubes can be used to tie both body and no-body flies. They are recommended whenever you need to add some weight to the fly and then wrap a body over it. They are most useful when you want the body to remain flat and just tie in silk, tinsel, braid, etc like in Willie Gunn pattern. You can also combine sections of both US tube and FutureFly Scandi Outer 3 mm tube. Of course US tubes can also be can be used in the same way as Compact tubes to tie no-body flies - it depends on your personal preferences and on fishing conditions.

    us-rigs-jpg

    Click for LARGE photo!

    Remember, there is more than just one proper way of using these tubes. Have fun experimenting

    All comments and questions are very welcome!
    Last edited by cloner; 14-01-2017 at 06:52 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    Posts
    3,417

    Thumbs up

    Great SBS Janusz, really clear steps, super pics and info
    so much fishing, so little time


    <a href="Hidden Content style="text-decoration:underline;">Andrew - Loop Akademi Fly Dresser</a>

  3. #3

    Default

    Great explanation Cloner. There are so many options with this system, particularly when it comes to weight within the fly, you should be able to find one to suit every fishing situation.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Hexham
    Posts
    1,332

    Default

    Stunning bit of work.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cill Chainnigh
    Posts
    6,721

    Default

    Very nice informative presentation Janusz. Well done for taking the time to explain, this will help many tiers on here.
    To one who has roved on the mountains afar
    Oh! For the crags that are wild and magestic
    The steep frowning glories of dark Lochnagar.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    428

    Default

    Thanks guys It too me a while to get the article sorted. May it help some people.

    CSpey, I've posted it on Foxy-Tail website and summarized all tubes in the table (I was not able to insert a table here on SFF - my bad ). Here is the article:

    Setting up TFS (Tube Fly System) Foxy-Tails.co.uk

    You can click on pics to display them enlarged.
    Last edited by cloner; 06-01-2013 at 11:19 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cill Chainnigh
    Posts
    6,721

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cloner View Post
    Thanks guys It too me a while to get the article sorted. May it help some people.

    CSpey, I've posted it on Foxy-Tail website and summarized all tubes in the table (I was not able to insert a table here on SFF - my bad ). Here is the article:

    Setting up TFS (Tube Fly System) Foxy-Tails.co.uk

    You can click on pics to display them enlarged.
    Bit of a cheat but here is your table

    To one who has roved on the mountains afar
    Oh! For the crags that are wild and magestic
    The steep frowning glories of dark Lochnagar.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    2,768

    Default

    cloner your explanations on how to work with this stuff is fantastic you are along with oz and intruder a great asset to foxy-tails and a valued member of the forum the work and effort that you put into that to make it so easy for us to use is appreciated greatly.
    Respect.
    And your flies are up with the best of them.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    2,169

    Default

    Again a very nice SBS and great explanation Janusz.

    Here is an example from me. I got a while a go some samples of TFS tubes from Sue and played a round with them however at that point I didn't know they were TFS tubes since they were not at the web site.

    This is a large version of my favorite simple fly tied with a skittle tube and free swinging hook.



    Description:
    Tube:TFS Skittle tube, transparent inner tube and orange soft tubing for free swinging hook
    Tying thread:Flymaster 6/0, red
    Wing:Orange rooster, hot orange baitfish emulator and orange rooster over
    Head:ProCone 4.5 small, gold


    Regards,
    Tom

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Cambridgeshire Fenland
    Posts
    1,048

    Default

    Cloner
    A well-presented and very informative thread, great illustrations.
    Many thanks for all the effort that took - we are all much better informed now!!
    For any newbie tube tiers on here, that is just what they need - well done.

    Can you please explain a bit more on this..."When choosing between free swinging hook and fix hook setup I follow simple rule - whenever I tie wing using soft materials like fox, tanuki I use free swinging hook. When my fly is to have stiffer wing made of boar bristles, bucktail, etc then I prefer to use fixed hook. In times I can't use free swinging hook with soft, long-winged fly then I simply go for fixe double hook instead of a treble." Is it to reduce wing wrap around the hook - I would have thought there was more potential for wingwrap with a free hook ???
    I have made some freeswinging tubes after KGM's post last year, and caught on them, but are reserving them for short, no-body, summer flies. Help !!

    I now just need the fingers and thumbs to do what the brain wants ......!!!
    Last edited by Stockybasher; 07-01-2013 at 09:30 AM. Reason: Added a piece

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