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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Alaska
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    Default Daylight Fishing for Sea Trout?

    Hello Everyone,

    I have a friend who wants to take me Sea Trout fishing when I'm in the UK. Sounds great except the part where he says we'll start around 10:00 PM take a break around 2 and then fish until dawn.........

    When I lived in the US state of Pennsylvania there were many venue where the chance to catch truly large brown trout existed by doing what they called "Night Fishing". Sounded good to me, 10 pound trout on a fly, what's not to like right?

    What wasn't to like was that aside from using a battery lamp I could hardly see a damm thing! I did catch a few decent fish but even that seemed diminished because you could only see them under the glare of the light. You had to become familiar with the bottom as well as the seams & pockets where you needed to cast during daylight and then cast blindly to those spots.

    And so I ask, is there no chance one of these UK sea trout will take a fly by the light of day?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    edzell
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    2,665

    Default

    You can certainly catch then in Daylight Ard.
    The ones bellow were caught between 8.00pm and 10.00pm.
    The bottom one of 3.5lb was on a Dr P flee. The other 2 on a wee stoats tail.
    During the day they are very wary or hiding in the rougher water.
    I tend to fish the heads of the pools earlier and the rest of the pool once its half light.
    Most of mine were caught on a dropping water, when suddenly it gets easier to catch them
    When it comes to visibility, you will see fine in June July till about 12.00pm, then it will be properly dark for about 2 hours then slowly light up again.
    Again, you will be surprised how small flies they will take.
    They fight very different to Salmon.
    They just don't like feeling any pressure and tend to zoom and jump everywhere.
    Allyshrimp on here is a dab hand at the seatroots.


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    Last edited by mows; 28-01-2020 at 05:53 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Alaska
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    Default

    Good to hear this I was thinking that they would act like the brown trout to some extent. They too (PA. browns) tend to be tougher to catch during the day unless there is a prolific hatch of may fly on. They will be either hiding among bottom rubble or hugging bottom in swifter water.

    The hours of light sound close to what we have here in June except it doesn't really get dark at all. The sun does dip to below the horizon for 2 1/2 hours but it just creates low light as if it were just before sunrise for those couple hours then it's back in the sky.

    I'm sure it'll be an experience and am looking forward to it.

  4. #4

    Default

    Yea, ive had them in daylight. I think it depends where you fish though. Its quite common on the coquet due to the water colour.
    Had this one this season just over 6 1/2 lbs it took a cascade in fairly clear water.


    Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Carlisle
    Posts
    447

    Default

    If your fishing the Border Esk ( which you mentioned) you certainly have a chance during daylight, if conditions are right, a falling water after a flood, weak tea is what I call it, will see seatrout readily take the fly.

    Around 1ft - 1ft 4" on Fishpal Canonbie will see you alright.

    The lower the water the later into the day- night you need to fish, early mornings, I mean EARLY 3am - 4am ! can be good too.

    Very low water will see fish congregate in just a few pools, you won't get anywhere near them in daylight as they'll hear you from about 50 yards !

    The Border Esk has a number of pools that are easily fishable at night, keep your casts short, check your gear every so often and enjoy it !

    Some nice seatrout about last June, a 6lber in the dark is something else !

    Tight lines.

  6. #6

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    Don't knock it until you've tried it Ard. Seriously be open minded and lap up the experience. It won't be like PA. That's guaranteed

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,498

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    There is nothing more exciting than having hold of a decent sized sea trout at night. It is enormous fun. And if you are only recently arrived then you will feel awake because of the time difference. For those of us who live here that is the difficult bit.

    All that said it depends where you are fishing and have already received some good advice. In June with our very short nights it isn't properly dark for very long and even when it is dark you will be surprised how much you can see. Embrace the opportunity, especially if you are being taken out by someone who knows what he is doing.

  8. #8

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    Ard, your experiences of night time trout fishing very much match my own thoughts. I have some of the best sea trout fishing on the island of Ireland around 100 yards from my back door and you couldn't pay me to fish for trout at night. I just don't see the point.

    There is no visual stimulation whatsoever and it is just casting blind and feeling for takes. The only other fishing I can liken it too is fishing for stocked rainbow trout with sinking lines with your eyes closed!

    Again, those are my personal feelings and I know people are very fond of night time fishing for trout but it just isn't for me.

    My river was once regarded as the best sea trout river in Ireland. In Olly McGilloway's book, "Along the Faughan Side", Stuart Donaghey did the flies and fly tying section of the book. He divided the sea trout flies into different categories.

    "Day and night flies (excellent)", "Excellent at night; very good during the day", "Very good - Day and night"... Etc.

    He then had another list of "Day only flies" which included patterns like "Greenwells Glory" and "Fiery Brown".

    According to Stuart, sea trout could be caught at any time, day or night. During the day he recommended fishing under thick cover and get your flies as tight to overhanging branches and banksides as much as possible.

    Stuart was one of the finest anglers and fly dressers, with a knowledge of dying and shades of colour, that there has ever been. Stuart is no longer with us either and a great wealth of knowledge went with him sadly.
    One of the best skills that an angler can ever develop is knowing the difference between passing the time and wasting it!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Culrain. Sutherland
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    I don't specifically target them but every one i've had here on the Kyle of Sutherland has been during the day (the biggest have actually been on very bright sunny days)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Isle of Lewis
    Posts
    292

    Default

    Hi, Ard. UK sea trout fishing times tend to vary by region. In the Hebs & NW Scotland they're take readily during the day on rivers and lochs. In fact, I never did catch one at night here in the days when I tried - not saying it isn't done though!
    In the Borders, on the Annan, it was night time fishing and largely the same on the Spey.
    Night fishing for sea trout is a wee bit scary and can be all the more exciting for that. Your hearing becomes more acute in the dark and the sound of a large fish splashily rising further down your pool really gets the adrenaline going. Then, if Fortune smiles, the sudden, hard, jolting take, often as you're lifting into a new cast, will send an electric shock zapping through your body.
    Pound for pound, I've found sea trout far more exciting, energetic, acrobatic and harder fighting than A. salmon. One S. Uist writer/angler recorded a 5 lb fish jumping over 20 times!

    Just make sure you've waded the river earlier in the day and plot your ins and outs before you step in. Take a torch but keep the light of the water as much as you can. Wear a life jacket, carry a whistle. Leave the bear spray and Magnum at home, we sorted out our bear problem a while back.
    Last edited by Lewis.Chessman; 28-01-2020 at 02:42 PM.

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