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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    West Sussex, UK
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    226

    Default Angling Trust Urges Anglers to Respond to Consultation to End Unsustainable Salmon Ne

    The Environment Agency has launched an informal consultation about the exploitation of salmon in England which, if the preferred option is chosen, could bring an end to unsustainable salmon netting. The Angling Trust is urging all anglers and businesses that are dependent on salmon fishing to respond to the consultation before the deadline of 9th October to ensure their collective voice is heard.

    The consultation is in response to the Angling Trust’s Save Our Salmon campaign, which was launched with support from readers of Trout & Salmon magazine. *The preferred options in the consultation would lead to new byelaws being introduced in 2018 to implement:

    • A 5 or 10-year moratorium to end mixed-stock fisheries at sea, including the drift and T&J nets in the North East that catch fish from numerous rivers on the East Coast of England and Scotland;
    • A 5 or 10-year moratorium to end netting in rivers which are predicted to be ‘at risk’ or ‘probably at risk’ of failing to meet conservation targets;
    • Voluntary measures to increase rates of catch and release by anglers, and the survival rates of released fish, on rivers where stocks are not in good health.

    In 2016 net fisheries in England caught over 20,000 salmon, the vast majority of which were from the northeast coastal fishery.The proposals to end mixed stock fisheries in England are particularly welcome as this method of exploitation has often been used by fishermen in Greenland and the Faroe Islands to justify an increase in ‘subsistence’ fishing in the Atlantic salmon’s Arctic feeding grounds, which damages stocks from all rivers throughout the UK, Europe and North America.
    The Angling Trust has issued guidance to anglers about how to respond to the consultation, which is available on its web site HERE. *After the consultation has finished, the Environment Agency will publish its final recommendations for new byelaws, which will be subject to a formal, 6-week consultation before implementation in 2018.
    The Save Our Salmon campaign is also pressing for greater controls of pollution, particularly from agriculture, reform of water abstraction legislation, and for action to tackle unsustainable predation of young salmon by fish-eating birds such as cormorants, goosanders and mergansers.
    Mark Lloyd, Chief Executive of the Angling Trust and Fish Legal said: “It is vital that as many anglers, and businesses which rely on salmon angling for all or part of their revenue, respond to the consultation supporting the measures to cease unsustainable netting of salmon. These precious fish are worth far more to the nation in rivers than if they are caught in nets at sea. The Angling Trust has campaigned vigorously to get these measures brought forward, and to avoid mandatory catch and release being imposed on anglers in England. We now need anglers to stand up and be counted by spending time responding to the consultation, and to spread the word to others to do the same.”
    Heidi Stone, Environment Agency’s Salmon Programme Manager, said: “We are working hard to improve salmon stocks and are seeking views on measures to further protect this important species. The issues facing salmon and the reasons for their decline are complex and there is no simple solution to increasing salmon numbers. Evidence indicates that the marine phase of their lifecycle is the most likely reason for their decline and that fishermen taking salmon is not the primary cause. But if we do not act now, we risk seeing further declines in salmon in many of our rivers. We are asking for views on a range of options and your responses will truly help to form our approach to managing salmon stocks in the future.
    More Information




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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Stockton on Tees
    Posts
    1,041

    Default Peace

    Well we shouldnt be netting estuaries that is for sure,as for the north east rivers well i also agree that netting on the sides of the piers at whitby isnt really the done thing these days,or shouldnt be,but then again that netter has been there since i was a kid perhaps a move to say sandsend or perhaps kettleness areas furth up the coast slightly.
    As for the Tees estuary area i say no to netting but as for the wear and tyne well a tricky one is that,the numbers are doing the opposite of what is being said,salmon numbers for these rivers are well up according tof ish count data and that has nothing what so ever to do with C & R.
    So if we did eliminate netting totally from all english and welsh rivers that would leave a problem,where would joe public source a wild salmon from? a english fish,not a farmed fish wild? then if that was to go ahead in england and wales and scotland was left to net certain waters still surely that would make poaching even more of a lucrative business than it is/was now.
    All BUSINESS would need to do is buy a few scottish fish keep reciepts then buy blackmarket salmon,the price of black market fish would soar and the antics we were once used to seeing on north east and yorks rivers would make a come back in the blink of a eye.Or would it be a case of hard luck joe public buy either foreign fish !
    Or we could have designated areas throughoutthe country ie north east rivers that may allow netting to serve the public.
    Not all rivers are suffering as we know,take the yorkshire rivers,they have all come back to life every single one of em,even the mersey has some sort of run,the rhine in europe is now getting salmon again,so swings and roaunabouts.
    Im all for taking off the nets but certainly not all as not all areas/rivers in the uk are suffering a decline in runs.
    "Don't hate the black, don't hate the white,if you get bitten just hate the bite"

  3. #3

    Default

    Some good points there Taddy.

    I filled in the consultation but I didn't complete the sections on netting. They were specifically for netsmen. As I had earlier declared an interest as an angler, I suspect the EA will ignore all responses from anglers to the questions directed at netsmen. That's what I would do as anglers significantly outnumber netsmen so netsmen's voices would be drowned otherwise.

  4. #4

    Default End Netting

    I'm fully in agreement with ending all commercial inshore netting, nobody needs to be a genius to realise there are far too many people, chasing far too few fish.
    The stream of consciousness is just looking for an ocean in which to open itself

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    mid Wales, just over the Shropshire border
    Posts
    2,069

    Default

    I've just filled it in, end netting it's an anachronism. Also they lie about their returns ( as per the north Esk netsmen) many more fish are killed than they tell the EA.

    I'm for voluntary C&R, personally I've not fished for salmon before 16th June for five years now, if it was all season C&R I'd probably give up.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy R View Post
    I've just filled it in, end netting it's an anachronism. Also they lie about their returns ( as per the north Esk netsmen) many more fish are killed than they tell the EA.

    I'm for voluntary C&R, personally I've not fished for salmon before 16th June for five years now, if it was all season C&R I'd probably give up.
    That was meant to be resolved by tagging.

    I think the key part of the consultation is to stress that CCR must be forgotten and any measures should be voluntary. i.e. don't ban worming, encourage the use of circle hooks. Don't mess with spinning, allow float fishing to prevent deep hooking maybe. The more restrictions on methods the more anglers will be put off and worse recruitment will be.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    3,678

    Default

    I'm the stats are out there, but I'm lazy and rather unusually busy. Anyone know off the top of their heads how many are taken by the nets in waters under the EA and how many by rods, and the proportion released?

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dryfly View Post
    I'm the stats are out there, but I'm lazy and rather unusually busy. Anyone know off the top of their heads how many are taken by the nets in waters under the EA and how many by rods, and the proportion released?
    Approx 12k rods 80% released, 20+k nets virtually none released.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    mid Wales, just over the Shropshire border
    Posts
    2,069

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Loxie View Post
    Approx 12k rods 80% released, 20+k nets virtually none released.
    GIve them their due Loxie, the 20,000 catch did result in 184 released ( I think it was buried in the substantial text)

    I agree, circle hooks, but don't ban worming, there's lots of older less mobile Angler's who's only real option is worm fishing. We have a crisis of recruitment into fishing and I think this restriction would mean many would not bother, especially in Wales.... it could be described as discriminatory.

    Same with barbless hooks and banning trebles ( seatrout especially are nearly always mouth hooked and easily returned) a pointless restriction. Essentially I'd throw the whole season open for salmon and follow the Irish system of tags for killed fish. Maybe two a season would do me.....

    I don't like the way they group nets and Angler's into the same pot- one makes limited returns on dead fish and doesn't release any, Angler's release lots and spend a fortune on each one caught.....

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dryfly View Post
    I'm the stats are out there, but I'm lazy and rather unusually busy. Anyone know off the top of their heads how many are taken by the nets in waters under the EA and how many by rods, and the proportion released?

    I am getting good at copying and pasting this information. I am angered by it to be honest, the actual kill can only be more:

    From the following document 2016 :

    http://www.gov.uk/government/uploads...eport_2016.pdf

    NORTH EAST REGION
    In the North East Region using Drift , T , and J nets a total of 18824 Salmon and 38,863 Sea Trout were caught by netting (table 6.7) - a total of 57,687 fish Killed.

    In the same netting area covering the river catchments of the Tyne, Aln, coquet, Wear, Tees and Ouse a total of 4460 Salmon and 2930 ST (Total 7390) were caught by rod - which at 80% catch and release gives a total of (7390 @ 20 %) 1478 fish killed (table 6.12).
    Last edited by offshore; 14-09-2017 at 09:57 AM.

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