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  1. #1

    Default What rod size(s) for UK waters

    Okay this will be the first of many obvious questions (feels odd being a newbie at my age!):

    What rod size or range of sizes would you recommend to cover most UK salmon fishing?

    In particular how light a rod would be practical?

    I tend to fish as light as I can with my trout fishing (it seems to produce better results for me). Would this be appropriate for salmon fishing?

    Thanks,

    Alttack.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    New Cumnock ayrshire
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    1,395

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    well it would depened on size of river you are going 2 fish

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheSpeyCaster View Post
    well it would depened on size of river you are going 2 fish
    And when you were going to fish them.


    You may be able to get away with lighter gear in the summer for example when the rivers are lower, but would struggle to throw a larger heavier fly/sinking line on tackle designed for light line work. If that is what the conditions dictate you'll feel very undergunned with a lighter outfit.

    A good compromise between say the 15ft all rounder so favoured on many rivers and a lighter 12- 13ft rod would be something like a guideline 14-14.5 ft rod rated 9-10. Nice and light, but with plenty reserves of power.

    Always better to try it first though and even better if it's with a bit of local knowledge regarding your river of choice from a casting instructor.
    Happiness is a tight loop Hidden Content

  4. #4
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    Aug 2008
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    Fountainhall. Selkirkshire
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alttack View Post
    Okay this will be the first of many obvious questions (feels odd being a newbie at my age!):

    What rod size or range of sizes would you recommend to cover most UK salmon fishing?

    In particular how light a rod would be practical?

    I tend to fish as light as I can with my trout fishing (it seems to produce better results for me). Would this be appropriate for salmon fishing?

    Thanks,

    Alttack.
    Better to say where you plan to fish, when you plan to fish (time of year) and you then will get more defintive answers.

    For instance Tweed or Nith at the back end in October or November need a whole different setup of rod and line/s from say Park on Dee in the middle of summer.

    One rod will do all and get you started but it will be a comprimise. So do try and give some idea of the venue and season.

  5. #5

    Default

    Thanks everyone.

    My association waters are on the middle Ribble, Hodder, upper Lune & Cumbrian Derwent.

    I'd like to be able to plan on getting myself a couple of rods: 1 to cover summer / low water conditions & the other for late season / high water.

    So a 13' 9wt & 15' 11wt maybe?

    I shall seek out a couple of association members & ask them what they use on our waters. (I fancy the Derwent especially!).

    I've obviously got a huge amount to learn; can anyone recommend a good book?!

  6. #6

    Default Perhaps a singlehander

    Hi.
    Your choice of rods is grand and there is nothing better than a delicate light 12' - 13 ' rod for summer work.

    But the rivers you mention in summer conditions can often be very low reducing fishing to streamy water in pool necks and runs with small flies.

    This kind of fishing is often more suited to a 10 - 11' 6" single hander with a light line (#5-7) and with the longer rod you can attach a 6" extension handle therefore turning it into a light double hander.

    The added benefit is that it can also be used for sea trout, Loch style fishing, rainbows and if light enough upstream nymphing.

    Some might say this sort of rod is too light for a salmon but over the years I have never found it to be so, and a light soft rod means you can really bend into a fish but still have plenty of spring.

    Of course if money is no object have all 3

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Belfast, N.Ireland.
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    Here's some advice from Michael Evans website on choosing a salmon rod.

    http://www.michaelevans.co.uk/advice..._an_Outfit.asp

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Newfoundland and Labrador
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    This is a bit of a stretch for some....and likely won't fit many UK anglers tastes....but the advice above is good (about the single handed rod)...but I'd suggest a 9.5 foot 9 weight with a medium fast action....or a faster action 8 weight and put a 9 line on it. Learn to fish inches of water slowly....unlike the rest of us who learned to pound one section of a run for hours or move quickly through a beat hoping to find a greedy salmon ready for a take...learn the lays and learn to present the fly in increments of 1 inch. Both the shotgun approach (spey rod blindly scanning loads of water) and the rifle approach (single hander fishing precise lay and inches of water) work.....but when conditions are not easy (lacking a load of fresh eager for the fly fish)....you'll do well to have learned to cast accurately with the single handed and learn the inches of wtaer (and may even land a fish or two while other very skilled spey anglers blanked!).

    PS the single hander is a bit less forgiving to learn to cast a good distance...say 80+ feet...(but does so more accurately in the average anglers hands)...but is worth ever extra hour. Learn to "double haul"...accurately.....even if you only fish rivers of less than 20 cubic meters a second in flow rate ....

    Enjoy your new found addiction...er um...I mean...."sport"!
    Get educated and involved in what salmon open net pens are doing, before it is too late!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Belfast, N.Ireland.
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    A single handed rod is good for small rivers, but on larger rivers, you are losing line control and it is also very tiring using a single handed rod all day, compared to a double hander.

    A compromise would be a Guideline 11ft 8/9, or a Partridge S series. Both have longer fighting butts and can be used single or double handed.

    You have to remember, 10-11ft single handed rods, put serious leverage on your wrist using them all day.


    An 8 or 9 line gives you better options to comfortably put out larger flies and poly tips.
    Last edited by rrw35; 01-10-2008 at 12:59 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Newfoundland and Labrador
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    Yes yes...I'm a casting instructor and guide and my arm ACHE with my 10+ foot super fast action single handers (eg Loomis two piece old style GLX)...I hate them! The 11+ footers should NEVER have been invented!

    Buy a 9.5 foot or 9 foot and learn to throw a fly 100 feet with it and land it on a pie plate.....you'll be glad you did...

    A grilse on a spey rod is like shooting a pigeon with an elephant gun....we tackle our 20+ pounders with everything from 6 foot 6 weights to 10 foot 10 weights...but rarely bother with a spey rod....we fish rivers as big or bigger than any in the UK....260+ cubic meters a second...and tiny wee streams of less than 10 cubic meters a second for both fresh grisle and fresh scary sized salmon......leave the spey rod for rivers it was designed for....dirty (sinking lines) and 10 feet deep the first step off the bank with 80 foot birch trees behind you for your casting lane...forget the slasher rod and buy yourself a neat tidy quiet single hander...and then learn what it can do....it can even spey cast on your tiny streams with no casting lane...the ones that you don't want to walk into for fear of scaring the fish...learn to double haul 80 feet of line...

    Like the song says in Stephan's adrenaline video..."there is hope"...break tradition and land some more fish! (Stephan was 16 when he filmed this...he's using an 11 foot 6 weight (yuck!)....see ya soon stephan!...but bring your 9 weight 9 foot!...Newfie fish fight hard in a river 160 yards wide!...).
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0ZJhum4_Q4"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0ZJhum4_Q4[/ame]
    Get educated and involved in what salmon open net pens are doing, before it is too late!

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