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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rrrr View Post
    Looking at water you regularly fish when its low in summer can help you find all the features like a bedrock shelf or hidden rocks/channels where the fish can dodge the main current. In higher water you can usualy see boils and swirls where the current is pushed around the rocks and the fish should be in or around the turbulence looking for the easiest place to hold position while still getting decent water flow. Sometimes salmon dont seem to follow the rules though as i know of a couple of lies on the tyne where the fish sit in fast water where you would never expect them to be.

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    When I think about it I should really know about these things as years ago I used to canoe some of the rivers around here. It's a weird sensation being in a canoe on a stopper traversing across the river, just at one point in the river with the water flowing fastest you. Good fun when I think back So I would imagine the stoppers will hold the Big Boys Right?

    Later

    Mick

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koka kola View Post
    sit down, rest and watch where the fishes are swimming. That's where fishes are. Ones jumping up and down lots are old and hard to catch. sometimes fresh fishes will rest beside old jumpers too though so worth try those for minute

    Watching is without rod. Just watch. Don't be excited and running in to fish river.

    Ask peoples fishing.

    Think you driving car and wanting a rest. Where would you stop? Fishes stop same places.
    Thanks for thoughts and advice. I've highlighted the word "watch" as it is something that I have great difficulty in doing ((lack of lamp oil) Eyesight not the best even with polaroids on I still can't see them )

    Later

    Mick

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mickyo View Post
    When I think about it I should really know about these things as years ago I used to canoe some of the rivers around here. It's a weird sensation being in a canoe on a stopper traversing across the river, just at one point in the river with the water flowing fastest you. Good fun when I think back So I would imagine the stoppers will hold the Big Boys Right?

    Later

    Mick
    Sometimes they sit behind boulders and sometimes infront of them. If you have been in a canoe at ovingham bridge on the tyne the fish sit above the runner under the bridge but oddly fish get hooked in the fast water below the bridge and you would expect them to be in the slower water on the edge of the current but for some reason they hang about in the fast water.

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  4. #14

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    Also the advice of watching is probably one of the best. Sometimes sitting at 1st or last light and watching fish moving into a pool or becoming active you can see them roll or show in likely lies. Nothing better than watching the sun come up on the river waiting for enough light to wade out and hearing fish showing before you have enough light to see them.

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  5. #15

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    At the end of the day, nothing beats experience of your particular river. Depending on conditions i.e. height of water, wind direction, shade from sun, lies, or more importantly 'taking' lies, and they can be different, change from day to day. One day if the water is low they may be hard up against the far bank in deep water then after overnight rain and a rise in the river, the 'taking' lies may be hard up against your bank in what the day before was only inches deep. You really need to put the hours in, or on more exclusive beats pay for the services of a ghillie who will know every inch and nuance of his particular beat and will guide his guests on where and how to fish their allocated section for that day. I have been fishing the same beat on a well known river for over 40 years and even still get it wrong and have to take advice from the ghillie.

  6. #16
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    As well as the fairly obvious lies in a river, there are lies known only to ghillies and those in the inner circle.........you will know you have arrived when you do your time and are taken into that small band! Mums the word mind you!
    Mike

  7. #17

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    Some good advice on here. A couple of points I would make.

    On some stretches/rivers, you have very clearly defined pools, currents, pool tails etc and these are relatively easy to read.

    On other rivers, you can have long stretches which on the surface appear almost uniform (although there may be all sorts of differences below the surface). These stretches are much harder to read and identify the most likely lies and taking places.

    Secondly, on any given stretch the likely taking spots can be hugely variable depending on water height. On the stretch I know best, in low water only a few sections of a few pools give a realistic chance of a fish. Same stretch with about 2 feet of extra water in, almost anywhere on the whole stretch could produce a fish - although ironically probably not the places most likely to produce in low water as they would be too turbulent.

    If at all possible, best to ask someone who knows a stretch where the most likely taking spots are at any given water height and then ask/think about why they are. Examples would be just where a run starts to settle out into the body of the pool (comfortable water for the fish), tails of pools when fish are running (stopping for a rest having entered the pool), near to rocks (shade and cover).

    In bigger waters, you will often get fish on what would be dry land in low water !
    Last edited by Occasional salmon fisher; 12-01-2018 at 02:51 PM.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Occasional salmon fisher View Post
    Some good advice on here. A couple of points I would make.

    On some stretches/rivers, you have very clearly defined pools, currents, pool tails etc and these are relatively easy to read.

    On other rivers, you can have long stretches which on the surface appear almost uniform (although there may be all sorts of differences below the surface). These stretches are much harder to read and identify the most likely lies and taking places.

    Secondly, on any given stretch the likely taking spots can be hugely variable depending on water height. On the stretch I know best, in low water only a few sections of a few pools give a realistic chance of a fish. Same stretch with about 2 feet of extra water in, almost anywhere on the whole stretch could produce a fish - although ironically probably not the places most likely to produce in low water as they would be too turbulent.

    If at all possible, best to ask someone who knows a stretch where the most likely taking spots are at any given water height and then ask/think about why they are. Examples would be just where a run starts to settle out into the body of the pool (comfortable water for the fish), tails of pools when fish are running (stopping for a rest having entered the pool), near to rocks (shade and cover).

    In bigger waters, you will often get fish on what would be dry land in low water !
    Good info Thanks. I will definitely take a closer look at and try to identify the different pools/pool types

    later

    Mick
    Last edited by Mickyo; 12-01-2018 at 08:26 PM. Reason: Rushed my reply as my tea was ready;-))

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Handel View Post
    One other thing. You will find you can read some rivers and not others so if you are struggling on one don't give up and think "I can't do this", keep at it.

    We get to fish a lot of rivers in flood in the UK and I have done a lot of it. I was fishing outside the UK last summer and the river was in flood. The guides had never seen anything like it and were completely lost. To me it was just like home, it came as a complete surprise to me that it was obvious to me where the fish were.

    Also last summer I was fishing a small river in the UK that was at summer levels, I was struggling.
    Thanks for the advice Handle, its much appreciated

    later

    Mick

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mickyo View Post
    Thanks for thoughts and advice. I've highlighted the word "watch" as it is something that I have great difficulty in doing ((lack of lamp oil) Eyesight not the best even with polaroids on I still can't see them )

    Later

    Mick
    Mick, you fish the Wear I believe?
    Don't get downhearted by reading comments by others who can see fish. The Wear is one of the harder rivers in which to spot fish on account of its colour. There are pools where fish lie in positions where they can be seen but many too where they can't, good eyesight or no.

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