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  1. #1

    Default Wear at it's best

    Sorry, I'll re-post later. All the attachments screwed up when I stupidly clicked "manage attachments" thinking it would enable me to manage attachments without destroying all those I painstakingly added to my post.
    Last edited by Walleye; 17-06-2019 at 08:44 PM.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walleye View Post
    Sorry, I'll re-post later. All the attachments screwed up when I stupidly clicked "manage attachments" thinking it would enable me to manage attachments without destroying all those I painstakingly added to my post.
    I was just looking forward to viewing them. Hopefully you get them sorted.

    Sent from my SM-J320FN using Tapatalk

  3. #3

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    After my last thread on the worst of the Wear valley (fly tipping, pollution etc), I promised myself to post some photos showing off the best bits of the Wear Valley, hopefully to encourage more visiting fishermen to our beautiful and productive little river.

    To stop you getting bored, I threw a few fish photos in. So if you have a few minutes spare, please join me in a lazy trip down the Wear Valley with an occasional detour down memory lane and a bit of local history thrown in...

    Rookhope Burn. Major trib but very little spawning due to a 5m waterfall a few hundred yards from where it joins the river.


    Rookhope Burn again. This isn't the 5m waterfall. I have no photos of that because the EA decided to destroy the view by building a big concrete gauging station right on the top of the waterfall but neglected to build a fish pass at the same time.


    Just downstream from St John's Chapel on the main river. This is the upper river, a few miles downstream from Wearhead.


    Slit Wood, Westgate, lovely walk on a burn full of picturesque waterfalls. Westgate was the western entry point to the hunting grounds of the powerful Prince Bishops of Durham. Eastgate is a few miles downstream.


    Nice August sea trout, netted by my son on my daughter's birthday. It's not that bad! We nipped out for a couple of hours on the river while my daughter was stuffing bears with her friends - build a bear I think it was called. Anyway, we landed two sea trout those couple of hours (the other is later on) the second of which I cooked for dinner and everyone enjoyed it. One of those days where taking every opportunity was rewarded.


    Slit Wood again


    Slit Wood


    Slit Wood. You can see the old lead mine workings in the distance. There were many lead mines in Weardale. The miners collected the crystals from the mines and created "spar boxes", some of which are on permanent display at Killhope lead mining museum. I once got a behind the scenes tour at the Natural History Museum and the flourspar specimens they had there were truly amazing, many from Weardale mines.


    Slit Wood. Every inch of the landscape you can see here was created by the lead mining activities.


    The circle of life.... a redd on the main river


    This is near Ireshopeburn on the main river. The upper river has many such waterfalls as it tumbles over limestone bedrock. This one has been used as a ford for many years. John Wesley visited Weardale 13 times and the lead mining community of Weardale become predominantly methodist.


    A nice salmon from further downstream. Caught by my son.


    A picturesque pool on the main river near Westgate. I've never fished the upper river but plan to take my trout rod up there one day when I get bored with the salmon and sea trout fishing.


    Old mine workings in Rookhope valley. It shows how aggressive mother nature can be in reclaiming what is rightfully hers...


    One of my favourite tree photos, same place.


    My son with his first salmon he ever hooked. The expression says so much about kids learning to fish. About 30 seconds later the fish came off and let's just say, without going into too much detail, he retired from salmon fishing for 30 minutes. He's had loads since but I'm not quite sure he ever got over that first lost fish.


    Another nice pool downstream from Westgate.


    Stanhopeburn. Another major trib. This was a favourite swimming hole as a kid.


    This is a huge tree growing out of the side of the wall. I've checked a few times and don't understand how it can support itself - the root structure must extend many metres beyond the wal from which it grew.


    Nice Wear brownie


    These next two photos were from a cold misty autumn morning next to the river. We caught it perfectly just after the mist lifted and before the dew evaporated from the cobwebs. Every single cobweb was clearly visible in the sun and everything was coated in cobwebs. The photo's don't do it justice, it was absolutely beautiful.




    Icicles in Hamsterley. Bedburn Beck flows out of Hamsterley plantation. Wear is the border country between "burns" and "becks", to the north they are mostly burns, to the south they are mostly becks with the odd combination like Bedburn Beck thrown in. Bedburn Beck is a major spawning trib on the Wear, joining the main river upstream from Witton le Wear.




    lovely flood plain / buffer zone - with more of this there'll be less flooding downstream. There are a few places where this still exists - for many years the fields have been pushed as close to the river as possible.




    Middle river, Newfield Dam. There may have been a dam there at one point but there isn't now. In my youth, this pool was legendary with stories of dozens of salmon and sea trout caught from it. It's the biggest pool on the middle river. I've never had even a pull from it.


    One of my favourite walks to one of my favourite pools on the Nature Reserve.


    This pool is just above Newfield dam on BADAC water. I don't know the name but it is a productive pool.


    One of my favourite pools at Page Bank. I must have caught ~100 trout in this short stretch as a kid. This was where I learned to fish dry fly for trout and where I developed the "killer fly" which I still use today. It looks a mess but it often catches on river and stillwater when all else fails.


    A July 1st sea trout from Page Bank.


    The sea trout which became my daughter's birthday dinner. Caught just above the Nicky Nack Beck at Croxdale in a smooth glide between two pools, classic Wear sea trout holding water.


    If you get bored fishing the free stretch in Durham, just have a wander up the north bank and take a photo of the cathedral with a rainbow in the backdrop.


    The swan version of dad's taxis. These little ones cadged a lift across the river in Durham, right over a hot spot where many salmon lie.


    Below Durham the character of the river changes, steep wooded valleys, long deep pools. This is one of my favourite lunch spots, I can spend 20 minutes eating lunch while watching the sea trout and salmon leaping clear of this pool any time from May to October. I'd see 10 or so jump out in that time, whatever the water levels.
    In this particular pool there are large slabs of rock laying just in the side of the far bank of the river. Apparently these are "leftover" building materials quarried from the hillsides here for the construction of Durham Cathedral. They would quarry the materials then haul them upstream to the building site by boat.


    Union Hall beat. I always fancied the long tail end of this pool as a sea trout hot spot but they lie halfway up the pool in a deep hole.


    That's it, I hope you enjoyed it. For more information on how and where to fish the Wear, see post #5 on the Wear thread. River wear 2019
    Don't forget if you get a few hours spare in Durham, the fishing is free and well worth a try. Some say it is the best fishing on the river.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Lancashire
    Posts
    695

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    Nice pictures, thanks.

  5. #5

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    Fantastic post walleye best on the forum for a while, some history on the river, some great photos and some fishy looking pools, great seeing your young lad into a fish thank's for taking the time to post it

    Arnold

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    on the edge of the North Yorkshire Moors
    Posts
    1,077

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    Wonderful post Walleye, makes me wonder why I have never fished the Wear?? some wonderful pools and unforgettable moments....
    Thank you for posting - I may have to nip up to Durham, its only an hours drive away
    If You want to test the depth of water...... dont use both feet!!Hidden Content

  7. #7

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    was that you today in woods at dam, was 2 of you? im the angler on other side 🤣

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by GOD View Post
    was that you today in woods at dam, was 2 of you? im the angler on other side 🤣
    No, not me. Unfortunately I was at work all day. Any luck?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walleye View Post
    No, not me. Unfortunately I was at work all day. Any luck?
    nowt, water had dropped to much for spinning but canny for fly

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyke777 View Post
    Wonderful post Walleye, makes me wonder why I have never fished the Wear?? some wonderful pools and unforgettable moments....
    Thank you for posting - I may have to nip up to Durham, its only an hours drive away
    It's well worth a visit if you are an hour away. Remember it's a spate river so timing is critical for the salmon. Many fish at night for sea trout which at times can be pretty special even if the river is not what it once was.

    It's not a big or long river but in a good year 25,000 salmon and sea trout run through Durham and I reckon the counter misses at least a third of what actually goes through.

    Some clubs are locals only, others like BADAC welcome new members and will walk the river and show them the good pools and hotspots.

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