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Thread: Killin

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    East Kilbride ( glasgow)
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    Default Killin

    Few pictures from today's walk. No big hills due to forecast . Only Donald's and corbets.

    dsc_0503-jpg

    dsc_0514-jpg

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  2. #2
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    Lovely scenery.

  3. #3
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    dsc_0521-jpg

    Right way round
    Last edited by mc andy; 10-02-2018 at 09:16 PM.

  4. #4
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    Bit of photo shop and loch Tay behind.

    dsc_0507-pano-jpg

  5. #5

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    Brilliant photos, really like the last one 👍

  6. #6
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    Default Days that are gone

    These photos remind me so much of expeditions in the mountains which I undertook when I was younger. I particularly recollect climbing Schiehallion in similar conditions.

    Other thoughts occur to me. Mountain gear is so much better now than it was in our day. Yet walkers and climbers are still dying each winter, mainly through falls or exposure, and perhaps less commonly through avalanches. Now please don't call me a killjoy. Winter walking in good conditions is a wonderful, enriching experience and if more people did it, they would, I'm sure, develop a healthier attitude to life. All I would say by way of advice is to take serious account of weather forecasts - they are more accurate and more up-to-the-minute now than they ever were; wear the best of gear for protection from wind; know your own capabilities and walk only within them, if on steep slopes, use lekki sticks; stay off the mountains if avalanche conditions prevail; take an army-style folding spade to dig a snow-hole if you expect to be encountering deep snow miles from anywhere - choosing the wrong route, or having to walk through thigh-deep snow, as I once did on the shoulder of Ben Lomond, is an energy-sapping experience and finally, from me at least, there is no shame in turning back. You only have one life. I used to be a member of the Jacobite Mountaineering Club in Edinburgh. I heard lectures from Pete Boardman, Doug Scott, Mike Burke and one or two others. Thrilling stuff from these determined experts. But they all eventually died on the mountains, as did their pal Dougal Haston. A chilling thought.
    .

  7. #7
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    Lovely pictures that show what Scotland can offer those whom get out the house and experience the lovely country we have.
    thanks for posting

  8. #8

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    Great winter walking photos, must start planning my next trip.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Invermarnoch View Post
    These photos remind me so much of expeditions in the mountains which I undertook when I was younger. I particularly recollect climbing Schiehallion in similar conditions.

    Other thoughts occur to me. Mountain gear is so much better now than it was in our day. Yet walkers and climbers are still dying each winter, mainly through falls or exposure, and perhaps less commonly through avalanches. Now please don't call me a killjoy. Winter walking in good conditions is a wonderful, enriching experience and if more people did it, they would, I'm sure, develop a healthier attitude to life. All I would say by way of advice is to take serious account of weather forecasts - they are more accurate and more up-to-the-minute now than they ever were; wear the best of gear for protection from wind; know your own capabilities and walk only within them, if on steep slopes, use lekki sticks; stay off the mountains if avalanche conditions prevail; take an army-style folding spade to dig a snow-hole if you expect to be encountering deep snow miles from anywhere - choosing the wrong route, or having to walk through thigh-deep snow, as I once did on the shoulder of Ben Lomond, is an energy-sapping experience and finally, from me at least, there is no shame in turning back. You only have one life. I used to be a member of the Jacobite Mountaineering Club in Edinburgh. I heard lectures from Pete Boardman, Doug Scott, Mike Burke and one or two others. Thrilling stuff from these determined experts. But they all eventually died on the mountains, as did their pal Dougal Haston. A chilling thought.
    .

    I'm very lucky to walk with a club with many experienced mountainers that put safety first. We simply didn't tackle a hill on Saturday as forecast was to be unfavourable.

    Just as an example this time last year we had completed 9 munros due to fantastic weather conditions as apposed to the last 4 outings we have had to settle for low level walks/ or corbets.

    As the novice of the group I'm currently cutting my teeth with map and cumposs. And was my duty to navigate on Saturday. And as you say walk to the conditions. We had intended to walk to the furthest Hill in the third picture but due to deep snow drifts our walking speed reduced dramatically and with 3km still to go thought the better of it. Ie the pub called

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Invermarnoch View Post
    These photos remind me so much of expeditions in the mountains which I undertook when I was younger. I particularly recollect climbing Schiehallion in similar conditions.

    Other thoughts occur to me. Mountain gear is so much better now than it was in our day. Yet walkers and climbers are still dying each winter, mainly through falls or exposure, and perhaps less commonly through avalanches. Now please don't call me a killjoy. Winter walking in good conditions is a wonderful, enriching experience and if more people did it, they would, I'm sure, develop a healthier attitude to life. All I would say by way of advice is to take serious account of weather forecasts - they are more accurate and more up-to-the-minute now than they ever were; wear the best of gear for protection from wind; know your own capabilities and walk only within them, if on steep slopes, use lekki sticks; stay off the mountains if avalanche conditions prevail; take an army-style folding spade to dig a snow-hole if you expect to be encountering deep snow miles from anywhere - choosing the wrong route, or having to walk through thigh-deep snow, as I once did on the shoulder of Ben Lomond, is an energy-sapping experience and finally, from me at least, there is no shame in turning back. You only have one life. I used to be a member of the Jacobite Mountaineering Club in Edinburgh. I heard lectures from Pete Boardman, Doug Scott, Mike Burke and one or two others. Thrilling stuff from these determined experts. But they all eventually died on the mountains, as did their pal Dougal Haston. A chilling thought.
    .
    Not really done any proper walking in the munros in winter (although occasionally in a fair amount of snow in May).

    I have been into the Lake District mountains a few times in very snowy winter conditions and have ended up in a couple of "interesting" situations.

    Like traversing a steepish smooth frozen snow slope with nothing but normal walking boots on and on another descent plunging down through the snow a few times leaving my feet dangling and my arms resting on the snow !

    As you say, if you are attempting munros in true winter conditions you really need at least someone in the group with good knowledge of that mountain (and what is likely to be a snow over a gap rather than snow on solid ground) and the right gear.

    Having said that, being in the mountains in the snow on a sunny day is about as good as it gets. Just make sure you pick a route that you know is relatively safe and within your capabilities.

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