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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Killowen, Rostrevor N.Ireland
    Posts
    37

    Default Catch and release.

    I have only been fishing for salmon for about four years and by no means would count myself as being knowledgeable about salmon fishing, but I would be a great supporter of catch and release,( my own view is that your heart doesn't skip a beat whenever eating your salmon but does when you hook one.) While fishing the river Mourne on Wednesday 15th, I caught and killed a 10lb fish which was tagged and hung up in the hut. A hour or so later I hooked and landed another fish of about 6lbs, which give me a great fight but was just in the net when the hook fell out. I decided to return this fish much to the discuss of an angler who has been fishing for about 60 years, his view was all fish caught should be killed. So I proceeded to put the fish back into the river and held it in the flow to try and revive it . After spending a long five or six minutes the fish was making no attempt to come round so unfortunately I had to take it out of the water and kill it. It got me thinking that fish returned into the river after being caught?. Is it really a good thing or not, indeed how many end belly up later on after swimming off . Any one got any views .

  2. #2

    Default

    If you play, land and handle fish in a conservation minded way then studies have shown as high as 100% survival rate. Even allowing for the odd mishap I would say 90% survival is easily achievable, so well worth the effort. Over 50 fish were radio tagged and released on Kharlovka a few years ago, all of them reached the spawning grounds.

    By the way, I have seen fish take well over 10 minutes to revive from time to time. Also sometimes a fish is just happy resting in your hands and needs a little encouragement at times to go, gently moving the fish back and forth helps. Also holding a fish in either too fast or too slow a current isnt good. The fast current is too hard for them while they are recovering and the slow one often doesnt contain the flow and ease of oxygenated water passing over there gills that they need.

    Dont let some old git on the riverbank who knows no better ever stop you from doing what you feel is right. The sooner guys like that die out of our sport the better.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Glasgow
    Posts
    4,005

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Springer View Post

    Dont let some old git on the riverbank who knows no better ever stop you from doing what you feel is right. The sooner guys like that die out of our sport the better.
    Stop sitting on fence Alan, say what you really think.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by floydie boy View Post
    I have only been fishing for salmon for about four years and by no means would count myself as being knowledgeable about salmon fishing, but I would be a great supporter of catch and release,( my own view is that your heart doesn't skip a beat whenever eating your salmon but does when you hook one.) While fishing the river Mourne on Wednesday 15th, I caught and killed a 10lb fish which was tagged and hung up in the hut. A hour or so later I hooked and landed another fish of about 6lbs, which give me a great fight but was just in the net when the hook fell out. I decided to return this fish much to the discuss of an angler who has been fishing for about 60 years, his view was all fish caught should be killed. So I proceeded to put the fish back into the river and held it in the flow to try and revive it . After spending a long five or six minutes the fish was making no attempt to come round so unfortunately I had to take it out of the water and kill it. It got me thinking that fish returned into the river after being caught?. Is it really a good thing or not, indeed how many end belly up later on after swimming off . Any one got any views .
    Could it be true....Falkus alive & well, and still fishing in Ireland??
    "I'd once talked to a bull trout biologist in Montana..." "One of the things that worried him was that as big and tough as these things seem, and even though the name bull trout makes them sound indestructible, they don't stand up well to being caught and handled, so that hooking mortality is higher than you'd expect: further evidence that as a numbers game, catch-and-release isn't always as straightforward as it seems."

    John Gierach - Bull Trout - in Fly Rod & Reel, June 2005

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    St Annes
    Posts
    186

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Springer View Post
    If you play, land and handle fish in a conservation minded way then studies have shown as high as 100% survival rate. Even allowing for the odd mishap I would say 90% survival is easily achievable, so well worth the effort. Over 50 fish were radio tagged and released on Kharlovka a few years ago, all of them reached the spawning grounds.

    By the way, I have seen fish take well over 10 minutes to revive from time to time. Also sometimes a fish is just happy resting in your hands and needs a little encouragement at times to go, gently moving the fish back and forth helps. Also holding a fish in either too fast or too slow a current isnt good. The fast current is too hard for them while they are recovering and the slow one often doesnt contain the flow and ease of oxygenated water passing over there gills that they need.

    Dont let some old git on the riverbank who knows no better ever stop you from doing what you feel is right. The sooner guys like that die out of our sport the better.
    Dont you think you have ended this thread a little strong? You have removed comments from this forum for such comments. This old boy is someone`s father and grandfather, and you are wishing him dead!!!!

  6. #6

    Default

    Floydie, I have also been critisised for returning fish on my local river. An old fella shouted at me and proceeded to tell me that the fish would now be caught by the men up in the mountains. He did not like the thought of that at all. The man in question kills 30+ fish a season and everyone goes into his freezer.....sadly to say the sooner these old togers kick the bucket the better.

    The way I see it is, 10 men, killing over 30 fish a season is at least 300 fish....300 fish which never see the spawning beds.

    The best advice I can give you floydie is, savour the fight but be smart about it, you don't want to totally exhaust the fish if you intend to return him. Keep him in the water, in the net and remove the hook carefully.

    Imo if the fish's gills are damaged at all, its curtains, best thing is to hit it on the head. Also, returning fish in very low water isn't always a good idea depending on the river.
    Tell me the legends of long ago, when the kings and queens would dance in the realm of the black rose - Roisin Dubh

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    "Middle England"
    Posts
    2,012

    Default death

    Not sure I wish anyone dead.......................................
    few people out there I do not like much but easy enough to send boys round and crack a few fingers off, is more painful than some deaths.

    anyway as Alan says it takes a long time for some fish to recover,
    One silver sea liced 12lb fish I had on the Dee this July I held for 10 mins at least before it swam off strongly at last.
    and have held some for up to 15 mins before they recovered in past.

    it takes as long as it takes.

    LG
    When your time is truly up, the Grim Reaper comes to smile at you.
    And all you can do in all reality, is to just smile right back at him...............

  8. #8

    Default

    The fight, photo session, landing method all effect the ability for fish to be returned, as does the water temperature and oxygenation. I have found the best way can be to stand with the fish ballanced between your feet, this works well in some situations. In trout ponds after fish are stocked some will lie on the bottom on their sides for some time, perhaps half and hour gasping beofre swimming off.

    A ghillie told me that when the fish's dorsal fin it is up it is ready to be released and swim off.


    The Dee c&R sucess has been monitored as part of the season extention radio tracking programme. there are links to the results on the dee trust website but fish certainly recover to spawn, even after having a genetic tissue sample, some scales removed and basically a minor surgical procedure carried out on them.

    If i remember correctly all the fish survived the catch experience and the vast majority went on to spawn. I think one returned to sea and one or two fell prey to otters, which is bound to happen in nature. More than one fish was caught a second time as a kelt!!

    C&R does work. Think carp which are caught so often they have names, salmon can be caught more than once, there are plenty of stories on this forum about this.

    Keep the odd one if you want, but put the majority back

  9. #9

    Default

    I remember releasing a fish on my local river on the last day of the season six years ago. The grass was crunching under my feet with the frost. I got a hen fish of about 9lb and I held in the freezing water for about 15mins before she came round. I couldn't feel my fingers for about an hour after it. Just give the fish as long as it needs, its very rare for them not to recover.

    I've been getting stick for years for releasing fish but I just come back with, "when you catch a fish you can do what you like with it so I'll do the same when I get one".

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Killowen, Rostrevor N.Ireland
    Posts
    37

    Default Catch and release.

    Many thanks for taking the time to read my thread. All your different views and experiences has educated some what on catch and release.

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