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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Gods County
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    3,408

    Default Nymphing for Salmon

    Probably with out thinking this is something I've done a bit of in practise but without malice aforethought!.
    Any way after reading the "Bad Run" thread and the flee's illustrated for the Avon.I decided to tie some up with intentions of fishing them in specific areas on my club water.
    As its a slow shallow river I've avoided weight and size concentrating on movement and form as in Marabou tails and trimmed fritz bodies(think 'Blob's).They're nowt special to look at yet(I've tied them so they won't be!), used single hooks and they're still to be trimmed to shape and essentially they're Mk.1 variations.Its doubtful I'll have any opportunity to sight fish with them, much rather prospecting known lays and small specific areas.
    In all likely hood they'll be fished off switch rods, after a reasonable amount of experiences with Bothy Cats Eyelet Francis flee's, its something I'm hoping will expand my days on the water somewhat.
    So for them as does, any tips?.Pedro.

  2. #2

    Default

    Is this like the steelhead nymphing you see from over the pond ?

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Gods County
    Posts
    3,408

    Default

    Not as far as I'm aware Rrrr,more like targeting Salar where you can see them in known lays and sight fishing a flee right down at their level where hopefully you can irritate a fish into taking the "flee".Of course,allways ready to be educated!.
    P.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Dublin Ireland
    Posts
    44

    Default

    I did a bit of it in Argentina earlier this year, for sea-trout, under tuition of an experienced local guide. My fishing partner had done it in Russia for salmon ( & had caught good fish) & he said the method was much the same - some kind of indicator, nymph (weighted) fished near bottom & dragless drifts. The guides were emphatic about the last point, and their line mending was an art. All short line work of course. We had some nice fish on one those rare sunny and calm days in that part of the world, when swinging flies etc were useless. I was amazed how effective it was & had to be told to strike for my first take - no strike, no fish. I'm now definitely going to try it for salmon here. A last point - the guides, who've seen everything over many seasons, reckoned if you couldn't get takes from sea-trout on this method, you wouldn't get them on anything else.

  5. #5

    Default

    I've had a few nymphing. The way I do it is spot the fish and induce a take by dropping the weighted nymph in front so it sinks down to eye level then draw it away. They do take it dead drift and sinking but the induced take method is by far the most effective for me. You need to strike or you won't hook them. If you are in peaty water a fluorescent orange or yellow tungsten head will help you keep track. Also be aware that it is quite difficult to get in to a position where you can see the fish but it can't see you. Stealth is crucial.

    I like the idea of fishing small nymphs dead drift under a float. One to try for me this summer. A small Frances would be interesting and I've tried it but quite half heartedly really. Food for thought.

  6. #6

    Default

    Wont spot anything in the tyne its allways dark brown. Could see it working on the coquet though with someone up a tree spotting like they used to do when fishing the shrimp.

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Dublin Ireland
    Posts
    44

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rrrr View Post
    Wont spot anything in the tyne its allways dark brown. Could see it working on the coquet though with someone up a tree spotting like they used to do when fishing the shrimp.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
    I should have said in my previous post that we were fishing coloured water where it was impossible to see the fish - hence the indicator method.

  8. #8

    Default

    Makes sense. It certainly sounds like something fun to try for the summer.

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  9. #9

    Default

    I've had a few over the years whilst upstream nymphing for trout.
    3lb bs tippet usually makes the outcome a forgone conclusion , but not always.
    April / May sprinters seem particularly susceptible to a dead drifted PTN of a size/weight to be just tripping along the bottom or a few inches above.
    Wouldn't like to have to use the method to catch a salmon to eat though.
    I'd go hungry.
    Seatrout are a different story altogether.
    Remember Thomas Muir of Huntershill

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    3,564

    Default

    Think induced take for Grayling, and multiply everything by 3.

    I've caught a few in Russia on a leaded Francis lifting it in the water coloum as it swings. Similar I guess.

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