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Thread: Bear Shooting

  1. #41
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Cornwall
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    184

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    Im going to try and find and post a link about a guy who was attacked twice by the same bear. Its a unreal read, especially how he plays dead as its tearing into him!
    Will hopefully locate it today.

  2. #42
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    May 2012
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    Cornwall
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    184

  3. #43

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    I have been fortunate to spend time with a first nation family over in BC using there self catering accommodation as our base whilst fishing the Fraser/Harrison rivers. We have become close friends over the years having first stayed with them over 10 years ago now. Arriving at their place is almost like arriving at home we are that used to it.

    We entertain them usually on the last Friday before we return home putting on a big BBQ with fresh crab and shed loads of wine and beer. We have also benefited from their hospitality having enjoyed moose meat, Elk meat and bear meat. We have also had home smoked salmon and Dons favourite wood steamed side of Chinook. Basically the side of salmon is pinned to wood which has been soaked in water. The wood is placed over the fire so it both cooks and steams from the moisture in the wood. Delicious!!

    Anyway back to the bear. Bears roam all over the area. They even had a family of black bears hibernate in their garden one year. Generally they will leave all of these animals alone as they tend to raid bins and eat non natural foods. This gives the meat a non natural taste and makes it unpleasant.

    Don occasionally receives a phone call from a local where a troublesome bear has to be taken out which he does and the bear meat goes into sausages so there is no waste.

    The bear we ate was shot, butchered and brought back from the first nations lands far away from where we stay. Land they own and have exclusivity to. The bears there only eat wild food obviously as there is no man or homes/bins for the bears to raid. The meat as they say is pure and untainted. They take only what they need and it is 100% sustainable.

    Bear meat. Its absolutely delicious!!Bears are in the same family as pigs so the meat has the texture similar to Pork but flavour wise in between pork and venison? Its a really unique flavour and very pleasant. I couldn't tell you what "cut" we tried but I think it would have been the rump of the animal? Very little fat and tender as anything. We loved it and tried moose as well. Moose meat sandwiches the following day so a real treat!!
    FISH ON!!! FISH OFF!!!!

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Sunderland
    Posts
    131

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyke View Post
    I believe she said earlier on that she prepared & ate what she shot & this gave her an appreciation of the real value of the animal as food.

    I don't think the hunter gets money for the carcase for taxidermy, rather they spend it at the taxidermists getting the skin prepared & mounted; it isn't a money making opportunity for anyone other than the taxidermist.

    A while ago I read an article which said the US fish & game dept. monitor the beech mast harvest each year; if there is a particularly bountiful one then bear survival rates through the winter hibernation increase & come spring there are lot more hungry bears competing for territory with larger numbers of them being pushed out into farmland & conflicts with humans [which can go badly]. Consequently they have to increase the number of hunting tags granted to increase the cull & control the numbers to a safe level which will reside in the reserves/ wilderness areas.

    Over here a good beech mast harvest usually just means nice fat wood pigeons....delicious - & much less hazardous to shoot than bears!

    Regards, Tyke.
    Never had wood pigeon whats it like?. There's thousands over here. talk about explosion. At one time you never used to see a wood pigeon now they are all over the bloody place. whats Magpie like? cos they are 10 times worse and they hunt in packs there are no birds around anymore apart from bloody pigeons, wood pigeons, magpies and bloody seagulls.
    Whats seagulls like?

    Later

    Mick

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mickyo View Post
    Never had wood pigeon whats it like?. There's thousands over here. talk about explosion. At one time you never used to see a wood pigeon now they are all over the bloody place. whats Magpie like? cos they are 10 times worse and they hunt in packs there are no birds around anymore apart from bloody pigeons, wood pigeons, magpies and bloody seagulls.
    Whats seagulls like?

    Later

    Mick
    Woodies are great. I tend to just cut the breasts off and treat them like a steak. DO NOT overcook or they are not great.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Sunderland
    Posts
    131

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loxie View Post
    Woodies are great. I tend to just cut the breasts off and treat them like a steak. DO NOT overcook or they are not great.
    Might have to get me a gun I only have to convince her indoors that its good free meat

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Sunderland
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Ben View Post
    I have been fortunate to spend time with a first nation family over in BC using there self catering accommodation as our base whilst fishing the Fraser/Harrison rivers. We have become close friends over the years having first stayed with them over 10 years ago now. Arriving at their place is almost like arriving at home we are that used to it.

    We entertain them usually on the last Friday before we return home putting on a big BBQ with fresh crab and shed loads of wine and beer. We have also benefited from their hospitality having enjoyed moose meat, Elk meat and bear meat. We have also had home smoked salmon and Dons favourite wood steamed side of Chinook. Basically the side of salmon is pinned to wood which has been soaked in water. The wood is placed over the fire so it both cooks and steams from the moisture in the wood. Delicious!!

    Anyway back to the bear. Bears roam all over the area. They even had a family of black bears hibernate in their garden one year. Generally they will leave all of these animals alone as they tend to raid bins and eat non natural foods. This gives the meat a non natural taste and makes it unpleasant.

    Don occasionally receives a phone call from a local where a troublesome bear has to be taken out which he does and the bear meat goes into sausages so there is no waste.

    The bear we ate was shot, butchered and brought back from the first nations lands far away from where we stay. Land they own and have exclusivity to. The bears there only eat wild food obviously as there is no man or homes/bins for the bears to raid. The meat as they say is pure and untainted. They take only what they need and it is 100% sustainable.

    Bear meat. Its absolutely delicious!!Bears are in the same family as pigs so the meat has the texture similar to Pork but flavour wise in between pork and venison? Its a really unique flavour and very pleasant. I couldn't tell you what "cut" we tried but I think it would have been the rump of the animal? Very little fat and tender as anything. We loved it and tried moose as well. Moose meat sandwiches the following day so a real treat!!
    Interesting reading.

    Thanks

    Mick

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Scottish Borders
    Posts
    23

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    Yes must say I love pigeon , probably my favourite game and simple to deal with.

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