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Thread: River Ribble

  1. #1
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    Default River Ribble

    Had an interesting conversation with an ex ribble rod on the last day of the Nith season and I use the word ex as per his words not mine. He said that the Ribble salmon when cooked tasted of pollution/oil of sorts and would never eat another.

    His statement amazed me as I had always thought that the rivers that were capable of salmon running them were clean and incabable of tainting the flesh of salmon/fish in general. When one considers that Salmon are usually in the river for a few weeks at most before they are deemed unsuitable for keeping due to colour etc etc, this kinda baffled me.

    Can any ribble rods explain if this is true or are we talking about a local spill or what?

    kf
    Last edited by kingfisher; 10-12-2008 at 08:08 PM.

  2. #2
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    I have been told this by a few anglers that have taken fish from the Ribble in the past. I think that these fish will have been caught on the lower Ribble below the Calder and quite a few years ago too. The Calder used to be one of the most polluted rivers in the country so its quite possible that fish lying in the river below the calder for any length of time could taste funny. The Calder is quite clean these days and has a good head of Trout, Greyling and coarse fish plus there are salmon and sea trout running it until they get to Padiham weir. Even though the water quality in the Calder is quite good there are still lots of nasty substance's in the sediment on the river bed of the slow deep pools so I wouldn't take a fish from the calder.

    Over the last 5 seasons I have kept 3 salmon and 2 sea trout from the Ribble and all have tasted great, all these have been very fresh and taken in the mid to upper reaches and a good few miles above the Calder.

    On the whole the Ribble is a clean river but there is room for improvement. The runs of fish have been steadily picking up over the last few years so lets hope the trends continue.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilbert View Post
    I have been told this by a few anglers that have taken fish from the Ribble in the past. I think that these fish will have been caught on the lower Ribble below the Calder and quite a few years ago too. The Calder used to be one of the most polluted rivers in the country so its quite possible that fish lying in the river below the calder for any length of time could taste funny. The Calder is quite clean these days and has a good head of Trout, Greyling and coarse fish plus there are salmon and sea trout running it until they get to Padiham weir. Even though the water quality in the Calder is quite good there are still lots of nasty substance's in the sediment on the river bed of the slow deep pools so I wouldn't take a fish from the calder.

    Over the last 5 seasons I have kept 3 salmon and 2 sea trout from the Ribble and all have tasted great, all these have been very fresh and taken in the mid to upper reaches and a good few miles above the Calder.

    On the whole the Ribble is a clean river but there is room for improvement. The runs of fish have been steadily picking up over the last few years so lets hope the trends continue.
    Thanks for the reply Wilbert. I suppose the Clyde has a similar situation with some of its tribs like the calder perhaps etc etc.

  4. #4
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    if ever I do manage to catch a salmon from the Ribble I will let you know but like you say, for a fish to have been tainted by the water it has got to have been in the system for quite a while.
    We are warned however not to taste the esapee rainbows from the Calder (tributary) as these could be contaminated.
    As Wilbert says, the river is clean and in most parts very beautiful and I can only assume the guy has not fished it for some time.

  5. #5
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    Caught and took a couple of fish from the Ribble about 6 years now. It tasted poor. Almost of diesel. A few of my fishing buddies took fish that tasted the same. This was on the lower river at Balderstone. The only thing we could come up with as a theory was that the fish had been led up in Preston dock area among boats and things unpleasant before they ran the system. Got to agree the fish taste great now although I havnt tasted one this season.

  6. #6

    Default trout

    I have had that taste with trout from the ribble - sea trout have been OK

  7. #7
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    Default What lay behind the dramatic headline in the Times?

    "Not to be alarmist I'll refer only to an article that appeared in the Irish Times, Monday, August 26, 1991 which led ultimatley to 2 reports (cost 8000) - 1 of which may have relevance here and I quote "there was evidence to show the presence of Geosmin, a natural substance, which may have caused the musty taste in the fish"..... "geosmin is produced by micro-organisms (actinomycetes and blue-green algae I think) living in slow flowing water and in organic detritus in water" "it has a mean taste threshold of 0.05ugrams/litre (ppb) in water and 6ug/kg (ppb) in fish.

    salmon smokers are only 2aware of geosmin - that's the smell that clears the smokery after sides come out of the smoker!

    now all this may have no relevance to the Ribble but may be worth considering
    Salmo salar

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salmo salar View Post
    "Not to be alarmist I'll refer only to an article that appeared in the Irish Times, Monday, August 26, 1991 which led ultimatley to 2 reports (cost 8000) - 1 of which may have relevance here and I quote "there was evidence to show the presence of Geosmin, a natural substance, which may have caused the musty taste in the fish"..... "geosmin is produced by micro-organisms (actinomycetes and blue-green algae I think) living in slow flowing water and in organic detritus in water" "it has a mean taste threshold of 0.05ugrams/litre (ppb) in water and 6ug/kg (ppb) in fish.

    salmon smokers are only 2aware of geosmin - that's the smell that clears the smokery after sides come out of the smoker!

    now all this may have no relevance to the Ribble but may be worth considering

    Interesting that you say this as from time to time Preston dock gets blooms of blue green algae.

  9. #9

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    Yes Ribble fish taste disgusting! So leave them in the river for me. As wilbert mentioned it is the Calder and Calder foot that can crete the problem, I doubt Preston is the problem as they are unlikely to hang about around the Moorings etc.
    Seriously i have heard of bad fish but never tasted one but then again i dont fish Calder foot area

  10. #10
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    The old tackle shop in Johnstone had quite a few anglers in it who fished the Gryffe and the Black Cart and some of them were always complaining of the fish tasting of diesel off the fish

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