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  1. #1
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    Default hmmm a wee bit over kill

    just came across this and wonder how they thought this was sustainable?
    stomach churning greed, but not having scientific evidence or the likes were they justified in their actions???? no doubt it has had an effect on todays stocks for sure but would they have thought this would have an effect on the future??????



    this is from a netting station on the tay and i have not posted to put down or right or wrong what was done, it's in the past an we have learned the hard way from it

  2. #2
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    sad to see but in those days folk would have eaten things like that to survive and lived off the land more. no mcdonals in they days..........

  3. #3
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    Default

    Hard to look at in the present day but,there must have been great feeding at sea when you look at the shape and size of most of the fish.

  4. #4

    Default Overkill

    I went to Spey Bay last yea and visited the salmon bothy, thankfully its a museum these days. They used to catch millions of salmon back in the Victorian age.
    They literally raped Spey bay untill there was very few migratory fish left. It's little wonder our Rivers are struggling to recover.

  5. #5
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    its so sad that would have been one days net.
    immagine if it was like that today?, mabe that would justify the prices asked of some of the so called "top" beats.
    just reinforces how precious every salmon we are fortunate to encounter is.
    it's pics like this that convince me never to kill another salmon, not to mention the fact that i don't really like them anywaty unless they r smoked..... i killed 3 out of 23 this season so dont feel so bad but i killed 5 out of 6 sea trout just because i like to eat them and i suppose there are less of them about so i am a bad boy that way???

  6. #6
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    I don't find it sad or repulsive. However these catches coincided with the mass habitat alterations, which combined killed off the fish. This scenario was played out around the globe. Same photos just different rivers and salmon species. Be happy your rivers are still even remotely capable of producing sport.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by stew1 View Post
    Hard to look at in the present day but,there must have been great feeding at sea when you look at the shape and size of most of the fish.
    Aye mate most of those big boys would have been gorging on sprats and even more so the auld herring, but man raped that resource as well didn't he ?

  8. #8

    Default Herring and tunny

    Quote Originally Posted by DOON ROD View Post
    Aye mate most of those big boys would have been gorging on sprats and even more so the auld herring, but man raped that resource as well didn't he ?
    Doon Rod, a friend of mine was telling me some years ago about the time he was working in Whitby I seem to recall, and being in a pub with pictures of huge fish called tunny which were caught on rod and line in the North sea. Apparently these fish are tuna family and came up to the North sea for the herring every year, but stopped because the shoals were fished out!!!! Imagine hooking one of them beasts on a mackerel flapper

  9. #9
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    Aug 2008
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    Yorkshire (were there a god it'd be god's own country) & Afrique
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    Quote Originally Posted by wormo View Post
    just came across this and wonder how they thought this was sustainable?
    stomach churning greed, but not having scientific evidence or the likes were they justified in their actions???? no doubt it has had an effect on todays stocks for sure but would they have thought this would have an effect on the future??????



    this is from a netting station on the tay and i have not posted to put down or right or wrong what was done, it's in the past an we have learned the hard way from it
    Hello Wormo

    Well, you call the image "disguisting" but is it?

    You infer it's greed, but perhaps that's because you don't understand the context? This may be called subsistence by some, others that it could be called slavery. Some may ask, in your cushy 21st Century existence "Who are you to judge".

    You ask whether they thought it sustainable?

    Next time you pass a library, pull out Iain Robertsons excellent book "The Tay Salmon Fisheries since the 18th Century". Have a good read. It is a fact that, until the hydro and other man-made impacts destroyed it, the Tay produced over 30,000 fish per year for decades, and decades, and decades and decades... totally sustainable.

    That is the beauty of salmon population ecology that makes them hard to exterminate. Unlike other fish with less flexible breeding strategies (e.g. trout, carp etc.) salmon can be harvested sustainably at rates of 50% or more, providing habitat remains constant. There's the rub, with increasing human encroachment on catchments, year on year, exponentially getting worse.

    IMHO Please do not find this image disguisting, celebrate it. For it ties man to food source, and harvesting/hunting/gathering. And is a reminder of the clean, unpolluted past.

    Something that is being lost as the new generation moves over to unsustainable methods of farming, food production etc.

    The salmon farmers are fighting a fierce PR battle against the harvesting of wild salmon, could I suggest you don't aid them

    If you emptied out one salmon farm cage, and displayed it in front of do you not think it would look more disguisting than this?

    I assure you it would. And the product laid out would not have been dining on a sustainable harvest of wild fish, it would have been produced at a major loss of energy and unsustainably.

    If you were to take a good look into the subject, you will see that actually, netting has never extincted a river's salmon population, but you will confirm that salmon farming actually has, as has human impact such as daming and polluting our great salmon rivers - the latter a direct result of human impact.

    Human impact, that is actually what you are adding to just by existing. You are one of an uncreasing number of unsustainable packages spreading across the face of the land, impacting, slowly but surely on the salmon population...

    Perhaps that is where you should direct your ire

    It's that or the salmon farmers... over to you
    Last edited by seeking; 18-12-2012 at 12:48 PM. Reason: sp!
    "...hooking mortality is higher than you'd expect: further evidence that as a numbers game, catch-and-release fishing isn't always as straightforward as it seems"
    John Gierach


    Fed up of debating C&R - see Hidden Content

    Unless otherwise stated, data used in any graph/figure/table are Crown copyright, used with the permission of MSS and/or EA and/or ICES. MSS / EA / ICES are not responsible for interpretation of these data by third parties

  10. #10

    Default

    I like to think that maybe over time we can get back to fishing like that must have provided. We certainly aren't killing like that in the rivers anymore. It looks like netting is on its way out - not fast enough, but on its way out. We aren't damming up the river like we used to. We still have to cut way back on ocean fish harvesting, and we aren't doing well in that department yet, but hopefully it is coming soon.
    There's a fine line between fishing and just standing on the shore like an idiot. Steven Wright

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