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  1. #1

    Default Can Salmon Netting be sustainable ?

    I have always been of the opinion that the only way to reduce/stop the practise of coastal netting is for the consumer to be informed of the details and if the customer stops buying, then there is no need for the product.

    I have had an e-mail from an upmarket food supplier today and the two phrases used to justify wild scottish salmon are :-

    We only buy our fish from Scottish netsmen who operate strictly within guidelines for sustainability.
    and

    We buy ours only from Scottish netsmen who operate within strict guidelines to safeguard stocks ---

    Interesting turn of (marketing) phrase

    No one in a senior position to answer questions at the moment (dining on salmon I fear) but explanations will be sought.


    Frank

  2. #2

    Unhappy ?

    Quote Originally Posted by turriff tackle View Post
    I have always been of the opinion that the only way to reduce/stop the practise of coastal netting is for the consumer to be informed of the details and if the customer stops buying, then there is no need for the product.

    I have had an e-mail from an upmarket food supplier today and the two phrases used to justify wild scottish salmon are :-

    We only buy our fish from Scottish netsmen who operate strictly within guidelines for sustainability.
    and

    We buy ours only from Scottish netsmen who operate within strict guidelines to safeguard stocks ---

    Interesting turn of (marketing) phrase

    No one in a senior position to answer questions at the moment (dining on salmon I fear) but explanations will be sought.


    Frank
    I dont know about truly sustainable, but would be a help if netsmen paid the same levies as owners and clubs.

    Abbie Barclay.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Aberdeen
    Posts
    5,114

    Default

    "Sustainability" requires two-way traffic in my opinion - harvesting (taking out) and re-stocking or re-seeding (putting back in).

    The netsmen and their operations only ever seem to take, take, take. A tad selfish don't we think given the valuable amount of work put in by others upstream to help fill their boats

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by turriff tackle View Post
    I have always been of the opinion that the only way to reduce/stop the practise of coastal netting is for the consumer to be informed of the details and if the customer stops buying, then there is no need for the product.

    I have had an e-mail from an upmarket food supplier today and the two phrases used to justify wild scottish salmon are :-

    We only buy our fish from Scottish netsmen who operate strictly within guidelines for sustainability.
    and

    We buy ours only from Scottish netsmen who operate within strict guidelines to safeguard stocks ---

    Interesting turn of (marketing) phrase

    No one in a senior position to answer questions at the moment (dining on salmon I fear) but explanations will be sought.


    Frank
    Talk about spin/bull! If this "upmarket food supplier" is buying from a coastal (mixed stocks) netting station, then they will not know which salmon stocks they are exploiting. Some of the fish caught may well be destined for rivers without an exploitable surplus. Consequently it is impossible for a coastal netting station to argue plausibly that its operations are "sustainable".

    Salmon netting can only be deemed "sustainable" if it is known which river(s) the fish are headed for and whether the river(s) in question have an exploitable surplus.
    Last edited by multi sea-winter; 05-07-2012 at 03:11 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Isle of Lewis
    Posts
    1,615

    Default

    I assume you are talking about legal salmon netting.
    It may be possible to shame the UK based "upmarket" retailers into stopping selling wild salmon but a major market for netted wild salmon is the continent and they will carry on buying regardless.
    There is also the problem of the not inconsiderable amount of illegally netted salmon that also goes straight to Paris, etc.
    The key to stopping the netting of salmon is to get rid of the market for the fish. Sadly, I cannot see a way to make that happen.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Aberdeen
    Posts
    6,842

    Default

    I agree wholeheartedly with each reply to the original post.

    Being an Angus Esks angler whose rivers are under threat from coastal netting, I would seriously doubt any level of sustainability, unless as Eminem says, the netsmen contribute (with complete parity) to the upkeep of habitat etc., on the rivers which they exploit.

    As has been proved by this years tagging of wild fish at sea by the Usan nets, some have appeared in the North Esk, some in the South Esk and some in the Tay (truly mixed stock netting!) Some have also turned up in the nets since the start of commercial netting at the beginning of May, and others have disappered totally!

    It is surely time that we have a carcass tagging system in force which makes it illegal to sell any wild fish that does not carry a tag. This is a move strongly opposed by the Usan netsmen........I wonder why?
    ..........so many flies, so little time!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Aberdeen
    Posts
    327

    Default

    Sustainability is a massive issue nowadays and is very much to the fore of the major retailers minds. They actually employ 'Sustainability Managers' to ensure that their sourcing policy does not lead them into any unforseen situations. I, as part of my remit, have to explain to these managers what our company is doing to conform to the set down sustainability and ecological parameters.
    Given the scale of focus from certain parts of the economy to the sustainability issue it is reprehensible that the outlets for wild fish are managing to stay below the radar and continue to trade in what are effectively 'pressure stocks'.
    The outlets for these fish would be easy to uncover, expose and be shown the error of their ways.
    Add a few stories concerning the shooting of seals and some of the well heeled diners just may decide to dine elsewhere or choose from somewhere else on the card.
    I've no doubt that 'Save our Seals' would embrace this route also in order to get their message across.

  8. #8

    Default

    The reply----

    We buy direct from licensed netsmen, who as you know are strictly controlled in the catch they take. We don't use any wholesalers whatsoever and we have complete traceability of every fish we buy.
    As a 4th generation family salmon smoker that has been in business for over 107 years we have every interest in preserving stocks and fishing responsibly.


    As you see they have no understanding of the issues.

    Obviusly my initial and subsequent e-mails cover all and more points raised above.

    Now for the hardball-- is the blurb false in the eyes of the advertising standards agency ?

    Frank

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Aberdeen
    Posts
    6,842

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by turriff tackle View Post
    The reply----

    We buy direct from licensed netsmen, who as you know are strictly controlled in the catch they take. We don't use any wholesalers whatsoever and we have complete traceability of every fish we buy.
    As a 4th generation family salmon smoker that has been in business for over 107 years we have every interest in preserving stocks and fishing responsibly.


    As you see they have no understanding of the issues.

    Obviusly my initial and subsequent e-mails cover all and more points raised above.

    Now for the hardball-- is the blurb false in the eyes of the advertising standards agency ?

    Frank
    Hi Frank

    Perhaps you should email them back and question them on what they believe to be 'strict control'.......pointing out the fact that the Usan nets failed to observe the weekly slap on 70% of weekends last season, and, because of this they may be buying fish that were caught 'illegally'!
    ..........so many flies, so little time!

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by turriff tackle View Post
    The reply----

    We buy direct from licensed netsmen, who as you know are strictly controlled in the catch they take. We don't use any wholesalers whatsoever and we have complete traceability of every fish we buy.
    As a 4th generation family salmon smoker that has been in business for over 107 years we have every interest in preserving stocks and fishing responsibly.


    As you see they have no understanding of the issues.

    Obviusly my initial and subsequent e-mails cover all and more points raised above.

    Now for the hardball-- is the blurb false in the eyes of the advertising standards agency ?

    Frank
    Frank

    1) Scottish netsmen are not licensed. Netting rights in Scotland are heritable property rights. Those netting will either be the owners themselves (eg Usan) or those taking a lease from the owners (as in the stake nets by the Annan).

    2) There are no controls whatsoever in the number of fish netsmen may kill.

    3) On the basis of what you have communicated, the organisation/company, that you are corresponding with, is surely in breach of ASA guidelines (which since earlier this year also apply to websites) if it puts the same rubbish (that it has included in its emails to you) on its website.

    MSW

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