Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Banks of the Tyne
    Posts
    798

    Default Cold winters good for sea trout?

    I was told this year on more than one occasion by other anglers and ghillies that a cold winter like we had last year (and so far this year) was the reason for an improved sea trout run.

    Any thoughts?

    TL
    "Go easy...step tight...stay free".

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Paisley strathclyde.
    Posts
    3,530

    Default

    Do not know if that is correct but we have had the worest run last season that i have seen.
    Am convinced that fish can tell what the weather for a good time ahead is going to be. The low water last year must have kept them well out in the sea or the nets would have had them. The backend had plenty of fish appear which to my thinking just proves that we still know very little about the fish.
    Long may that continue.
    Bob

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    ALBA
    Posts
    578

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goosander View Post
    Do not know if that is correct but we have had the worest run last season that i have seen.
    Am convinced that fish can tell what the weather for a good time ahead is going to be. The low water last year must have kept them well out in the sea or the nets would have had them. The backend had plenty of fish appear which to my thinking just proves that we still know very little about the fish.
    Long may that continue.
    Bob
    And so the next time you hear someone call them 'stupid little fish' you can tell them different, eh

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Paisley strathclyde.
    Posts
    3,530

    Default

    They say fish have a very small brain so what does that make us trying to catch them and failing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Derry
    Posts
    439

    Default

    I watched a documentary which showed how cold seas slowed plankton and other tiny creatures swimming making it easier for shrimp prawns etc(trout and salmon food) to feed easier. They grow bigger and more numerous, trout and salmon feed on the them and grow bigger and so on. It also show how warm seas affected these tiny creatures and they moved a lot quicker and reversed the cycle. Small/less shrimp and prawns therefore less for for trout and salmon to feed on.

    Not very welll explained but you get the idea. I hate the snow but if helps the fishing I'll happily put up with it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Aberdeen
    Posts
    6,894

    Default

    Must say the seatrout runs have definatley improved since we went back to cold winters.

    The slowing of plankton etc. also helps increase the sandeel population, with the knock on effect of better feeding for seatrout/grilse/salmon.

    Definatley better conditioned grilse this year.....even the tiny ones were perfectly proportioned.
    ..........so many flies, so little time!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Banks of the Tyne
    Posts
    798

    Default

    Well if it is true we should be plums deep in them this year!
    "Go easy...step tight...stay free".

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    cumbria
    Posts
    201

    Default

    seen a couple of sea trout spawning in my local beck.. which i dont think a sea trout has been caught on in years...
    the young apprentice...

  9. #9

    Default

    Malcolm Greenhalgh wrote an article in FF&FT quite a while ago linking salmon runs to feeding and linking the feeding to the North Atlantic Oscillation. This cold weather is also being linked to the North Atlantic Oscillation, and it is said that the last time the weather was like this was back in the sixties (before I was born, and when salmon runs were much better than they are now). If this is all correct then we can expect a good run of salmon next year, much like we had this year - as long as the SNP don't screw things up too much by helping salmon netting stations to get EU grants and thus encourage the Faroese and Greenlanders to start netting at sea again!
    I'll have to try to dig Malcolm's article out so that I can read the details again. If he is correct then all of the bad weather hassle will be well worth it.

  10. #10

    Default

    I found Malcolm's article last night ("The rise and fall of the heavyweight champions", Malcolm Greenhalgh, FF&FT Nov/Dec 2001). It's a very interesting article, if you're in to that sort of thing. It's basically a prediction of whether we will ever see BIG fish like we used to back in the days of Georgina Ballantyne, and his basic answer is no, because we don't have the herring stocks off of coast nowadays, but he also covers feeding at sea in a lot of detail. He relates sea feeding for salmon to the North Atlantic Oscillation Index, which in turn is related to the difference between the Azores High and the Icelandic Low pressure systems. For the last 25 or 30 years we have been in a NAOI high, which is not good for sea feeding. The area with the correct sea temperatures (between 8 and 13C) has been small and the feeding has been limited as a result. When the NAOI is low (like it was in the 1960's and early 70's) the area with the correct sea temperature is much greater and therefore the food resource is larger for the fish. We are in an NAOI low at the moment, which is giving us a cold winter in the UK. This should (fingers crossed) lead to improved feeding at sea, fatter grilse and a larger number of MSW fish. On the beat that I fish most often we have seen a general increase in the size of the fish this year (although I did land a wee 2lb'er. The 18lb'er made up for it, though!). Hopefully this trend will continue next year.

    If this sort of stuff interests you and you want to see the entire article then PM me with an email address and I'll try to get it scanned to send on to you. I know that this doesn't really answer the question of better feeding for sea trout (which don't range as far) but I feel sure that it's due to a cooling of the sea which improves breeding or feeding for sand eels.
    All the best to you and yours this Christmas and for the New Year,
    Feugh.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •