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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,113

    Default Heading and Tailing

    Sorry if this should have been in the 'Rookies' section .


    Can you experienced folks tell me what, if anything can be taken from the various 'signs' of salmon on the river.

    On my last few days fishing i have seen salmon completely leaving the water vertically....i assume they are either....taking a fly/insect from the surface........trying to clean sea lice from themselves.....or are just plain 'enjoying life'.

    A lazy kinda sideways half out of the water 'flop'

    And a 'hump' showing on the surface.....as if the fish is arching it's back, and only showing the the 'arched' back.....almost 'porpoise' like

    I would be very interested in what might be learned from these 'Signs', with regards to what might be 'takers', and which not, or any other views/information on this.


    Thank You


    Brian

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Dumfriesshire
    Posts
    1,393

    Default

    Cover the head and tailing fish every time you can. IMHO that is the taking fish.

  3. #3

    Default

    Generally a salmon that is leaping around a pool is not a taking fish.

    A fish that is boiling on the surface (almost trout like) I find more often that not will turn for a fly and more effectivly, if you can drop a bunch of worms just upstream of the boil will take them no problem.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    AYRSHIRE
    Posts
    685

    Default

    Most of the fish I have seen which show in a vertical fashion have been in the tail of a pool. As such I have always concluded these to be running fish newly arrive into a pool. Salmon which show with a half hearted sort of sideways roll generally tend to be long term residents. Fish which show with a slow head and porpoise type roll, see--saw toggling action, are either new tenatnts to lie, or running fish. Either way if these fish are covered quickly after being seen they tend to be ready takers.
    Last edited by ABK; 14-08-2010 at 10:05 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    New Cumnock ayrshire
    Posts
    1,397

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hurricane View Post
    Generally a salmon that is leaping around a pool is not a taking fish.


    got to disagree hear I been told and seen with spring fish if they are leaping they are usually good taking fish shows a sign they are aggravated and a passing spinner or fly makes them worse and they go for it usullay a violent take
    Let It Run !

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    In a cooling North Atlantic...
    Posts
    1,127

    Default

    Brian,

    See 'Reynolds number' fluid flow.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Isle of Lewis and Glasgow
    Posts
    233

    Default

    For me all the jumpers, floppers, head and tailers and every other 'sign' of fish just lets you know that there are fish there. There is no possible way of saying that a fish just breaking the surface is a ready taker. If you see a fish and cast over it I reckon 9 times out of 10 if you hook a fish it will be a different one than what you seen.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheSpeyCaster View Post
    got to disagree hear I been told and seen with spring fish if they are leaping they are usually good taking fish shows a sign they are aggravated and a passing spinner or fly makes them worse and they go for it usullay a violent take
    Agreed. Taken many a fish that have been consistently showing in a pool...

    The only certain thing that fish showing in a pool weill tell you..is that there's fish there..

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    AYRSHIRE
    Posts
    685

    Default

    From my expereince I tend to believe that fish which head and tail are ready takers. If a fish is seen to head and tail and the location is covered after some delay then the possibility of hooking a different fish from the one seen is certainly possible. This I can accept without argument. However if a fish is seen and covered almost instantly, the chances are that if you hook a fish in the location you saw the rise, it will more than likely be the one which was seen. (Note I say more than likely and not definately). In wide rivers, or in peaty water, or coloured water, fish observation can be difficult, but on smaller river systems on a few occasions due to the location of some fish it has been possible to see "the" same fish which had just head and tailed only a couple of seconds earlier come and take a fly or lure.
    Last edited by ABK; 15-08-2010 at 10:39 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Brunei Darusallam
    Posts
    1,591

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by keirross View Post
    Brian,

    See 'Reynolds number' fluid flow.
    What's Navier Stokes code or cfd got to do with a fishes propensity to take. I'm intrigued
    "In Britain we have a saying for situations like this.......difficult, difficult, lemon, difficult"

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