Thanks Thanks:  11
Likes Likes:  36
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    North Yorks
    Posts
    4,049

    Default 7 years of Just One Week

    Just One Week celebrates its 7th birthday.

    What started out as a low-key mind-clearing exercise for a limited audience has grown into something else entirely, with over 100 posted chapters. Over the past 7 years it has been read by almost 25,000 people from more than 170 countries world wide. Once you strip out the political campaign web-crawlers - American and Russian - and the visits of porn site promoters, there have been close to 150,000 genuine page reads. Most of those have come from members of this Forum, so many thanks for your interest.

    What is especially interesting is what has most interested you. The top 5 most popular posts have been:

    Walking to the Water Part 1 - the basic fly selection tool read over 2,200 times
    You want to go to Norway?
    Review of the Vision MAG 13
    River Ure Swinton Beat
    MCX's Christmas Stocking 2015

    None of the more serious scientific stuff on sound, smell and navigation even makes it into the top 50, which tells me to keep it either light hearted or tackle orientated!

    Thank you everyone.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    East Kilbride ( glasgow)
    Posts
    3,363

    Default

    Very well done Michael your contribution to forum and blog has been much appreciated by many

    Cheers andy

  3. #3

    Default

    Your blog is always a great read and as has already been said by Andy very much appreciated if it wasn't for your review I wouldn't have put my hands on a vision mag what a fantastic wee rod it is and very quickly became my favourite rod

    Arnold

  4. #4

    Default

    If I'm being truthful I was not the biggest fan on a j.o.w to start with but it has grown on me. I must admit the Christmas stocking fillers are some of my favourites.

    Keep up the good work,

  5. #5

    Default

    My most satisfying catch of recent years (first Yorkshire salmon) was due to J.O.W. information, so I am obviously grateful for that - plus a Vision Mag, Rio Scandi and Ikon waders now I come to think about it !

    Slightly off thread, but do you know how badly the Ure spawning becks been affected by the recent flooding ?

    I watched the news footage of Hebden Bridge and wondered where the Hebden Water finally discharges - after googling I was suprised it comes East to the Ouse and eventually Humber. As somebody who lives close to the Humber I should know this. I imagine a few Ure fish might take the wrong turn this year and end up in the Calder Valley.

    When you check the Humber catchment it amazes me - from Darlington to Birmingham, and not really that far off kendal and Shrewsbury (as the crow flies). A lot of Salmon potential hopefully.

    Environment Agency - Catchment Data Explorer

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    North Yorks
    Posts
    4,049

    Default

    I'm not unduly worried about the redds this month in the context of big spates. This because the recent rainfall has come on top of already high water levels, so you don't get the same gouging effect as you can get with sudden rises in low water. In addition the rainfall in upper Wensleydale hasn't been too extreme: the gauge at Bainbridge hasn't tested its record levels and the side becks look OK. Although the Kilgram gauge reached black-line zone that stretch can carry a great deal of water. To be frank I'm more concerned by water temperature and the risk of premature hatching before the invertebrate life-cycle gets going.

    Yes, the Ouse catchment is enormous, much bigger than the Tweed. There are salmon present in most of the constituent rivers with the probable exception of the Nidd owing to its major dams. If salmon are now passing Aysgarth Falls - and I have a sneaking suspicion that some are - it will open up enormous acreages of potential spawning and nursery areas, all the way to the Cumbrian border. The repopulation owes much to straying: I reckon that on some rivers perhaps 20% or more may stray, sometimes over substantial distances. When they netted the Mersey some years ago they found fish from just about everywhere, including the Tyne and Tay. Straying is one of the salmon's survival strategies and explains how they got through the Ice Ages (by going as far south as the Gambia and into the Mediterranean). Give them good water and behold, they come.
    Last edited by MCXFisher; 16-02-2020 at 06:16 PM.

  7. #7

    Default

    I find your blog very interesting and has changed the way I fish! very much appreciate the science as well!! happy 7th birthday and I look forward to many more!

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •