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Thread: Terminology

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    Default Terminology

    It must be very confusing for the beginner when the length of mono attached to the fly is referred to as the leader by some experienced anglers and as the tippet by others.
    e.g. If it is a PolyLEADER then what is the length of mono attached to it which terminates in a fly?
    To me it is the tippet.
    I've had this discussion/argument with several local anglers who insist that I'm wrong. (Davie )
    Google says:
    "Tippet is a specific gauge monofilament line that is attached to the end of the leader, to which you tie the fly. The tippet is usually the smallest gauge line on your rig and is virtually invisible to the fish. ... By tying on tippet, you can avoid losing taper. The fly is tied to the end of the tippet."

    Isn't Google wonderful......when it agrees with you.

    Just trying to feed the forum with topics until the fish appear.....if ever!

  2. #2

    Default

    Polyleader with leader tied on the end works for me.

    Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Default Terminology

    Things that can go on the end of the line:
    Tip
    Leader
    Tippett

    Tip: most often where there is a short head or shooting head and the tip is inter changeable to affect e.g. the sink rate of the front-end of the flyline, so mostly that means it is forming part of the casting structure of the fly line.

    Leader: can be Poly leader or more traditional mono leader. Can be tapered in either case or can also be level. E.g. level mono or more often level T stuff ( tungsten).

    Tippett: a length of lighter strength material be it nylon, mono, copolymer, fluorocarbon take your pick!
    Tippett can be floating or sinking material and is generally similar so as to be less visible and more compliant to allow the fly some movement And to turn over at the end of the cast.

    You can just stick a length of mono on the end of the line and it covers the job of all three.
    You can also stick it on the end of a tip for example and not have the poly leader in the middle.
    Introducing the other components in sequence provides more sophistication to the way the whole outfit casts
    Last edited by noeyedeer; 10-02-2020 at 08:44 PM.

  4. #4
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    up to ma tits in water on the ayr
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    Default

    tippet for me
    Id rather have something I don't need than need something I haven't got!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    Inversneckonia
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    Default

    noeyedeer said....etc.


    ....aye, but what do you call the bit that the fly is attached to?

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rytenuff View Post
    noeyedeer said....etc.


    ....aye, but what do you call the bit that the fly is attached to?
    No idea! Lol

    Based on the above, probably tippet, or leader if the only length added to the line.

    Unlikely you’d attach a fly to a tip.....

  7. #7

    Default

    A leader or tippet if you like the yank way of saying thing's

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    North Yorks
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    Default

    rytenuff is right indeed. It's ridiculously confusing.

    To me, everything beyond the end of the line is the LEADER. How you assemble your LEADER offers all manner of options: for example, it can comprise a polyleader (or VersiLeader if you're from Idaho) onto which you need to add a bit more leader material, which you can also call TIPPET (not a term that has ever appealed to me) that we used to call NYLON. if we don't put a polyleader onto the end, then the leader is entirely composed of NYLON (or TIPPET material if you insist).

    I think I understand, but for a novice it must be horribly confusing, especially as all anglers are anarchists at heart, and change the nomenclature randomly. Meanwhile the tackle manufacturers have joined the game, and being commercial, they've leased random word generators to populate the text of their catalogues. Sage, being American and bigger, have also leased a hyperbole generator, pre-set on Turbo. If anyone can correctly divine the characteristics of a rod from what it says in the catalogue or on the website they deserve a prize. There's a special extra prize if you can detect what has actually changed between one generation of Sage rods and the next.

    here's a taster:

    "The new [blah] rods let you experience the remarkable benefits of [blah technology] through access to the more powerful lower sections of the rod, allowing for easier and more efficient load carry through the casting stroke.

    The [blah] is equipped with an ultra-fast action high line speed taper to carry large amounts of line at distance with wind cutting performance. Perfect for long traditional or scandi lines and, or winter Skagit heads with heavy sink tips and flies."


    Bah, humbug, elderly harrumph

  9. #9

    Default

    No one's said cast!!

    When I grew up we used "cast" for the bit between the line and the fly. Ample scope for further confusion!

    I use leader for the bit between line and fly. For me this usually consists of a tapered section and a tippet. For clarity I refer to the tapered section as a leader as well! A standard salmon leader for me might be made up from a 9' tapered leader to a 13lb point with a 4' 12lb tippet.

    For some trout fishing, straight line buzzers especially, the tippet will be considerably longer than the tapered section.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Isle of Lewis
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    Default

    Are you guys talkin' 'bout the trace?


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