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  1. #11
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    Paisley strathclyde.
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    M problem with tracking smolts out to sea and beyond is mans greed. The fishers with there drift nets will be using the information get the fish on there way back home.
    Bob.

  2. #12

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    This might be of interest, as a supplement to MCX's blog post.
    I forgot to add, quantum effects like this are also used by some animals in their sense of smell so I wouldn't fully rule out smell playing some part in the migration. Chances are, the salmon being the king of fish, uses quantum navigation and quantum smell as a means of finding their way home, maybe at different points in the migration when different spatial sensitivity is required. For sure, they use them both to successfully avoid both me and my offerings.

    Last edited by Walleye; Yesterday at 07:29 PM.

  3. #13
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    Mar 2013
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    North Yorks
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walleye View Post
    This might be of interest, as a supplement to MCX's blog post.
    I forgot to add, quantum effects like this are also used by some animals in their sense of smell so I wouldn't fully rule out smell playing some part in the migration. Chances are, the salmon being the king of fish, uses quantum navigation and quantum smell as a means of finding their way home, maybe at different points in the migration when different spatial sensitivity is required. For sure, they use them both to successfully avoid both me and my offerings.
    I'm unconvinced by the use of smell in a highly mobile ocean. Because, in an interesting bit of research, the Norwegians blocked the noses of a sample of salmon to disable their olfactory sensors. The great majority of the sample group found their way home successfully without using their sense of smell.

    That said, the salmon's sense of "smell' is incredibly acute, capable of distinguishing traces down to parts per multiple billion. That means being able to detect a pub measure of whisky in a pool 50 metres long, 20 wide, with an average depth of 1.5 metres. There a fuller discussion in The Importance of Smell on J1W, including some thoughts on how this acute power influences the salmon's behaviour.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by MCXFisher View Post
    I'm unconvinced by the use of smell in a highly mobile ocean. Because, in an interesting bit of research, the Norwegians blocked the noses of a sample of salmon to disable their olfactory sensors. The great majority of the sample group found their way home successfully without using their sense of smell.

    That said, the salmon's sense of "smell' is incredibly acute, capable of distinguishing traces down to parts per multiple billion. That means being able to detect a pub measure of whisky in a pool 50 metres long, 20 wide, with an average depth of 1.5 metres. There a fuller discussion in The Importance of Smell on J1W, including some thoughts on how this acute power influences the salmon's behaviour.
    I agree, I don't think a salmon could make it's way home on smell alone but I do think they use both smell and navigation. It's not inconceivable to use it's internal navigation to get close and then smell to select the right river, most of the time anyway.

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