Thanks Thanks:  18
Likes Likes:  140
Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 59
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Fife
    Posts
    250

    Default Packham v Beavers ?

    Chris Packham is now wanting to plant 100k trees, yet we
    introduce a creature that cuts them down on a daily basis.
    We managed for hundreds of years without Beavers yet a minority
    of people thought it would be a good idea to re introduce them.
    I'm not wanting to start a scientific v common sense debate but just
    to show how controversial some of their do good projects are.
    There is no argument that planting trees are good for the planet,for once I agree with Mr Packham but
    there is not much evidence that Beavers are good for Scottish river systems.
    In fact speaking to some Latvian shooters, they cannot believe (to the point
    of laughing) that we introduced them to a country that was free of them.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Aberdeen
    Posts
    7,200

    Default

    .....and there's the rub.

    The likes of Packham and his followers are so obsessed with their own fervour that, they literally can't see the wood for the trees.
    ..........so many flies, so little time!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    banks o bonnie doon
    Posts
    4,840

    Default

    Packham needs his head examined,the man has his own agenda for the countryside

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    North Tyne
    Posts
    567

    Default

    Water side trees Like willow and alder have growing characteristics that have evolved from creatures like beavers , I donít think itís a bad thing ...I can think of a few burns on the Tyne that have dozens of trees Cris crossing and they are absolute fish havens and the small stew ponds are ideal nurseryís for you young sea trout and salmon... thatís how nature has evolved. Obviously when they get down to a country estate or farm land and start chomping through specimen and veteran trees then you have a problem but In uplands I think beavers are a good thing and naturally part of migratory fish creating habitat.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Paisley strathclyde.
    Posts
    3,605

    Default

    Just wondering how many deer are going to be killed to save the trees and how many capercailly going to die caught in the deer fences. Planted on the higher ground the white hares that shooters have been told to stop shooting will be left to eat the trees.????
    Bob.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Galloway
    Posts
    205

    Default

    A hypocrite of the highest order cleverly making money from all his admirers to the detriment of our country life and wildlife, despicable man!!
    He is going to have to plant a lot more trees to offset his own carbon footprint.

    Chris Packham Archives - Guido Fawkes Guido Fawkes

    These wildlife trips do not include flights it seems, so an even larger carbon footprint left by this hypocrite
    Last edited by Wafty Cranker; 29-11-2019 at 10:14 AM.
    When i read about the perils of drinking whisky..............................i gave up reading!!

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mattytree View Post
    Water side trees Like willow and alder have growing characteristics that have evolved from creatures like beavers , I donít think itís a bad thing ...I can think of a few burns on the Tyne that have dozens of trees Cris crossing and they are absolute fish havens and the small stew ponds are ideal nurseryís for you young sea trout and salmon... thatís how nature has evolved. Obviously when they get down to a country estate or farm land and start chomping through specimen and veteran trees then you have a problem but In uplands I think beavers are a good thing and naturally part of migratory fish creating habitat.
    I tend to agree with this.

    There are a few burns that feed my river that have basically become storm drains in recent years with the amount of moorland and farmland drainage that has taken place. The water in the main river rises and falls very quickly. Perhaps a few naturally made dams in the upper reaches of those burns could hold some of the water back and allow it to release more slowly into the main river meaning that it takes longer for a spate to disappear. The slower release and filtration of water through the dams should make the river clean sooner too rather than two days after the river is back at normal levels.

    Slower release of water in the higher reaches can also help against flooding.

    With seemingly no interest or appetite to help to slow down water release by local authorities, perhaps beavers could be part of a natural solution to a man made problem.

    I know there's pros and cons in every argument and the pros mentioned above probably don't outweigh the cons in the bigger picture of introducing beavers.
    One of the best skills that an angler can ever develop is knowing the difference between passing the time and wasting it!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    1,570

    Default

    . . . . and provide top class nurseries for juvenile fish, especially protection against febs

  9. #9

    Default

    The downside being they cut down trees which provide shade , keeping the water cool in increasingly warmer summers.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Galloway
    Posts
    205

    Default

    Dams, are they not likely to put an obstacle in the way of some migratory fish to spawning grounds? No spawn, no juveniles.

    When the numbers increase and they start felling trees into pools and runs, who is going to foot the cost of removing these from the fishing grounds?
    When i read about the perils of drinking whisky..............................i gave up reading!!

Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •