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  1. #1
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    Default Boris backs trees - really?

    Radio 5 live this am has Mr Johnston wisely suggesting the way to stop flooding is to keep the water in the hills...with trees...Has sensible thinking broken out?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by meyre View Post
    Radio 5 live this am has Mr Johnston wisely suggesting the way to stop flooding is to keep the water in the hills...with trees...Has sensible thinking broken out?
    Only if he is also planning to buy out a load of hill farmers.

  3. #3

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    Unfortunately for Mr Johnson, the problems on our hillsides cannot be sorted by a few trees, or even a few million trees. Moorland restoration is a bit more complex and hugely more expensive than planting a few trees.

    A start maybe, but no solution to the problem.
    One of the best skills that an angler can ever develop is knowing the difference between passing the time and wasting it!

  4. #4
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    Well quite a number may go when the tariffs are set.....that doesn't mean anyone will plant any birch....was he thinking of paying my hill top cousins money to become gardeners?

  5. #5

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    I can see where this is headed.
    Mark my words , itíll all end in tears and snotters
    Remember Thomas Muir of Huntershill

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by meyre View Post
    Well quite a number may go when the tariffs are set.....that doesn't mean anyone will plant any birch....was he thinking of paying my hill top cousins money to become gardeners?
    Nah too slow, plant something quicker growing............acid run off, what's that?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by meyre View Post
    was he thinking of paying my hill top cousins money to become gardeners?
    Quite possibly, if policies from the previous government are carried forward.

    Tree-planting in England falls 71% short of government target | Environment | The Guardian

    "Michael Gove, the environment secretary, has promised a national campaign of tree-planting, with pledges from the government of £50m for 10m new rural trees and £10m for 130,000 urban trees by 2022."

    We're supposed to be doubling the area under woodland, apparently.

    Tree planting in UK 'must double to tackle climate change' | Environment | The Guardian
    Last edited by charlieH; 15-11-2019 at 03:35 PM.

  8. #8
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    Nov 2007
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    Very heavy rain falls on already waterlogged ground, and houses built on flood plains flood. This will happen regardless of whether more trees are planted or not. Or am i missing something?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roag Fisher View Post
    Very heavy rain falls on already waterlogged ground, and houses built on flood plains flood. This will happen regardless of whether more trees are planted or not. Or am i missing something?
    Even at this time of year, when the trees aren't actively growing and drawing up water, they do still help to alleviate the problem. The soil almost certainly won't be saturated deep down, and tree roots create fine channels that allow rain to penetrate deeper into the soil more easily than it might otherwise do - especially when compared to ground that is regularly worked by machine and so is likely to have developed a pan below the surface. If you were to walk across an arable field, and then through a mature wood next to it, I think you would notice a difference underfoot.

    Some of the rainfall will go to replenish the water table, especially in areas where the underlying rock is porous (e.g. chalk or limestone), but even aside from that, getting the water deeper underground will slow the rate of runoff and hence reduce the problem of flooding.

    You're right that it won't entirely eliminate the problems that arise when housing is built in inappropriate areas, but it will help a bit.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roag Fisher View Post
    Or am i missing something?
    Grice.
    Remember Thomas Muir of Huntershill

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