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  1. #11
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    Mar 2008
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    Fife
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    You can improve the habitat to near perfection but pointless if the breeding population is dwindling.
    I have referred this situation on other threads to shooting. You can plant the best woods, gamecrops,
    crops, feeders and water but you wouldn't expect a 100 bird day unless you released, hatched and reared pheasants.
    Most major rivers had several hatcheries for decades so how was it feasible then. But it is pointless and financially crazy to introduce juvenile fish when a high percentage are eaten before they reach the salt water.
    f you have a rat problem in a shed full of wheat, you don't put more wheat in, you get rid of the rats

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Paisley strathclyde.
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    Post 9.
    Many years ago our river was stocked with eggs from the Conon. The Conon fish were very slim so were easy to tell apart from our own which are deep bellied fish. We certainly had a good number of them back.
    I have a photo of a 25 lbs Earn fish besides a 15 lbs. Conon fish and they were both the same length.
    Bob.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Isle of Lewis
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    1,592

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    Quote Originally Posted by goosander View Post
    Post 9.
    Many years ago our river was stocked with eggs from the Conon. The Conon fish were very slim so were easy to tell apart from our own which are deep bellied fish. We certainly had a good number of them back.
    I have a photo of a 25 lbs Earn fish besides a 15 lbs. Conon fish and they were both the same length.
    Bob.
    You are the first person i have ever heard describe Conon fish as thin!
    It may be an indicator of how suited Conon fish were to the Earn!

  4. #14

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    Surely I am not alone in wondering exactly what I get for my EA licence money these days? Personally I can't see justification for the amount levied on us over the non migratory.licence when the EA do less and less each year to bolster the cause of salmon and sea trout or indeed any fish. I appreciate that the district board situation in Scotland is quite different, but it appears the alleged 'fishery scientist' line is the same and flies against the view of the vast majority of anglers. It's the tail wagging the dog

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by liphook View Post
    Surely I am not alone in wondering exactly what I get for my EA licence money these days? Personally I can't see justification for the amount levied on us over the non migratory.licence when the EA do less and less each year to bolster the cause of salmon and sea trout or indeed any fish. I appreciate that the district board situation in Scotland is quite different, but it appears the alleged 'fishery scientist' line is the same and flies against the view of the vast majority of anglers. It's the tail wagging the dog
    We get to pay for gudgeon and roach to be stocked into scruffy ponds full of rubbish that will rarely get fished Hatcheries - a personal view from practical experienceHatcheries - a personal view from practical experience

    Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Paisley strathclyde.
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    Roag Fisher.
    When I say thin [Conon fish] I do not mean thin as in a kelt but thin compared to the standard Earn fish. I had quite a few at the time and would like to see fish from different rivers stocked. It could be possible that other rivers stock go a different way to the feeding grounds. Have heard about the genetics of stock being mixed up and it is not a good idea. Worth trying anything that puts more fish into our rivers for our children's children.
    Bob.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    work, pub or where big salmon lurk
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    1,660

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loxie View Post
    Every river, I believe, needs to be considered on its own merits and there is no doubt that hatcheries can be part of the solution for some. In the end you can't beat good habitat, but that is becoming increasingly hard to achieve. To further your Curlew analysis it's farming practices, particularly sileage cutting, that has done for ground nesting birds in the south. Unless this is changed stocking more Curlews won't help. Incidentally Mr Packham and his followers might be interested to know that land managed for grouse shooting provides the last real havens for Curlew, as well as Golden and Green Plover, Snipe, Oyster Catchers and other critically endangered ground nesting birds: in fact on just one such estate, Knarsdale, there are more breeding Curlew than in the whole of South and South West England from a line between the Severn and The Wash.
    oyster catchers endangered? the noisy critters have multiplied 10 fold, if they multiply any more they will be included on chris packhams wild justice allowed to kill list, the stupid birds nested in the middle of a busy stone carpark where I was working, we had to put road bollards round the nest, to guard it from the obvious bitter end.
    my three most successful flies are gold bodied willie gunn, gold bodied willie gunn and gold bodied willie gunn

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Liverpool
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    3,589

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    Great opening post Jamie, fantastic to hear that the fin clipped fish have made it back, the proof is in the pudding. I remember helping stock the first unclipped batch up the burns in I think 2009, and an unscientific observation of my own is that in later years fish can be caught after any lift of water throughout the season and not so much mainly back end.
    Last edited by happy days; 13-06-2019 at 10:26 PM.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by marty31 View Post
    oyster catchers endangered? the noisy critters have multiplied 10 fold, if they multiply any more they will be included on chris packhams wild justice allowed to kill list, the stupid birds nested in the middle of a busy stone carpark where I was working, we had to put road bollards round the nest, to guard it from the obvious bitter end.
    I think it rather depends where you live. The Eurasian Oyster Catcher is globally declining and its IUCN Red List status is near threatened, compared to say the Hen Harrier which is Least Concern.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Paisley strathclyde.
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    Seen oyster catchers nesting in what to our eyes is a stupid place like a carpark/tipped loads of gravel/roof of fishing hut/gutters round the farm etc. They regularly succeed in rearing there young. Those that nest on the gravel banks and in grass fields often get eaten by sheep.
    Bob.

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