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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Aberdeen
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    6,850

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    As above, a 'wide' single spey, snap t or perrypoke should help keep you out of the riverbank vegetation. We suffer the same later in the season on the Aberdeenshire Don once the reeds spring up....it's a pita.

    If you're fishing heads, then the shorter the better in these circumstances.

    Lies and holding water can change from year to year. I can think of places which 6/7 years ago always held fish that are now barren, on one local river, yet other parts never, ever fished before that have produced the goods.

    Tight lines for your new season!
    ..........so many flies, so little time!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Ross on Wye
    Posts
    707

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    Quote Originally Posted by salmonaddict View Post
    Single Spey every time. You can throw a "wide" anchor which will put your anchor a bit further out into the stream and prevent your D going too far behind you. Also, go for a short head like a Rage 👍
    Totally agree, single spey cast with short head to keep a shallow D loop. I would also use as long a rod as you have as it makes it easier to keep the D loop out over the water and away from the bank side vegetation.

    My favourite Usk pool requires just this technique and I often use my 14ft 9 inch rod with a Rio SVT on this pool because of fishing off a narrow shelving ledge with a steep overgrown bank behind and growth along the edge. Yes I can and do fish it successfully with my 13ft but it is just so much easier with the longer rod.

    Whilst the bank is grassed in this film, it does show the technique although I would fish left hand up rather than over the opposite shoulder as is shown here.


  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    North west London
    Posts
    472

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    Fantastic video, thanks.
    Cue, let's sort out tackle ready for next week.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Gods County
    Posts
    4,573

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    Isisalar,were I you I'd pay an awful lot of attention to the Video with Mr.Greenacre.Allthough his popularity levels may not be sky high on here you just simply can't argue the guys record.
    Now,I don't fish the Avon at all, never have, and some could well argue I don't know what I'm talking about.I do feel both your outfits are on the light side, most certainly for spring fishing!,there's some big fish in there and they will play if you get your presentation right.
    If you pay attention to his rig description, he's using a 650 grain I Flight Skagit with an integrated Intermediate tip and 2(yup two) Mow Tips of T14 and a short leader to get his flee down.Thats a pretty heavy set up, but it looks a strong flow and the rivers carrying extra water! and with that kit-he's getting down level with the fish and swinging his flee as slow as possible-thats what you'll have to do.
    If you fish lighter and faster especially early season there won't be much in the way of big silver things chewing on yer flee!.
    A longer stronger rod will importantly allow you to fish the heavy tips needed to get down, control the swing of your fly, help keep your line away from bankside obstructions when casting and help you control a fish too.Lighter rods may well see you taking too long with fish which isn't a good thing when its catch n release.
    You have the chance to fish a special place which just could throw up the fish of legend and if you do things right, it could be you that gets it!
    Bear in mind the big Avon fish of the past fell to spinning tactics in years gone by, if its fly only below a certain water level(which I think it is!) then you'll do best fishing a flee that acts and fishes the same as a spinner.
    A Skagit line 15ft and longer T tips of T14,T17,T20 etc and big bright tube flies fished down deep and as slow as you can swing them!
    Don't muck about, be brave you have a unique opportunity that most on here would love to have.
    I know what I'd do!,like him or not I'd spend a day watching Mr. Greenacre,I gather he's an approachable amenable enough guy, that I'm sure enough would be time very well spent!
    I wish you nowt but the best, but please up the gear!.Pedro.
    Last edited by Rennie; 10-02-2019 at 04:52 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    North west London
    Posts
    472

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    Thanks for that Rennie, I'm not fishing as far upstream as Mr Greenacre and my beat doesn't have quite the pace as up at Somerly. Even in last year's exceptionally high levels I didn't have that much trouble covering the water with the 13'6", I was mostly using a 10' Airflow extra fast sinking tip and a Spey line, was still catching bottom occasionally so I'm pretty sure the 10' T14 and the 600grain Skagit will only improve things in the deeper pools. Fairly confident in the presentation. As I mentioned some of the taking lies are where the water shallows up to 4-6' at the tails of deeper pools. One is 16' in places. Mistakenly said upstream yesterday.
    Appreciate what you say about playing the fish, I will be using leaders around 20lb which should take care of any weeding/snagging and drag on the line, there are effectively no rocks in the river, it's gravel or mud/chalk generally. Given that It's virtually impossible to apply more than 3-4lb of pressure with any sort of bent rod the stiffness of the rod is not something I'm unduly worried about. Both rods have enough backbone to boss the fish rather than the reverse.
    Try this :- Get any of your favorite rods, thread on line and attach to a 2lb bag of sugar or similar. Place the bag under the rod tip with the rod parallel to the ground and lift it off. You have just applied 2lb of pressure to the line. I'm pretty sure with the 15ft er the bag will stay on the ground.
    I'm no stranger to playing large fish on fine tackle, Winter rarely sees me using nylon thicker than 0.13mm (3lb 6oz) to a size 16 hook and the bag of sugar test performed all those years ago gives me the confidence to apply far more pressure than would seem sensible, don't lose many and usually it will be to a hook pull. 5lb Chub, 8/9lb Barbel not uncommon.
    I've taken a picture of some of the black and yellow flies bought for this year, I'll put it on a separate post.
    Cheers

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    North west London
    Posts
    472

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    2019-02-10-16-15-55-jpg

    How are these, big enough?

    I appreciate what you're saying re a 15' rod presentation wise, I'll see how I get on and may well be visiting the wanted section here and seeing what's on Ebay in the near future. 15 ft ers seem to go for peanuts these days so shouldn't be too painful.
    Last edited by Isisalar; 10-02-2019 at 06:41 PM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Gods County
    Posts
    4,573

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    Those flee's look bob on Isisalar, use very similar myself.
    If by the sound of things you are using an Airflo 10ft poly tip it can't be such a strong powerful current!.If you can pick the bottom up out in the middle with a brass tube and the fastest sinking 10ft poly then your set up should be fishing ok, if its only on the dangle you're hitting bottom then respectfully I'd look to fishing a faster/heavier tip and flee arrangement!. To be honest I'd have a day trying to hook bottom out in the flow! then at least you'll know where you are and how to best tailor your approach!
    As for your rod, well to a large extent you are right there, however the lighter lined smaller rods wont have the "guts" left when a big fish has them well bent and if its heavy water you could be in trouble!.I'd always take a longer rod option for sinking lines/tips and heavier flows!,I've seen several rods bottom out with big fish in strong flows, leaving the angler more or less playing a fish from the reels drag.
    Any way like I said, never fished there and if what you use is working? I won't argue.
    Best of luck and get some photo's up when it all comes right for you.
    Pedro.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    North west London
    Posts
    472

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    Flies courtesy of Ronny at Helmsdale tackle, not the cheapest but very good quality.
    Can't praise them enough. Had a non delivery problem and he sent out a replacement batch, no quibble, which arrived in London the next day after reporting. Won't be the last order I place with them.
    I tied flies for years and it's very likely I'll start again before long, meantime Helmsdale tackle will be getting my business.

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