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  1. #1

    Default Landlocked salmonfarm

    Green light for Europeís biggest on-land salmon farm - FishFarmingExpert.com

    Green light for Europeís biggest on-land salmon farm

    Salmon Evolution plans to produce 28,800 tonnes of salmon a year at an on-land plant. Illustration: Salmon Evolution
    Salmon Evolution plans to produce 28,800 tonnes of salmon a year at an on-land plant. Illustration: Salmon Evolution
    Plans for Europeís biggest land-based fish farm have today been given the go-ahead by councillors in Norwayís MÝre og Romsdal county.

    By Editors
    Salmon Evolutionís proposed NOK3 billion (£279m) facility will have a maximum standing biomass of 13,300 tonnes and an annual salmon output of 28,800 tonnes.

    The first construction stage is planned to be completed by 2021. The company expects the plant, on the peninsula of Indre HarÝy in Frśna local authority, to create 80 jobs.

    Ingjarl SkarvÝy:
    Ingjarl SkarvÝy: "Positive response" to land-based farm.
    ďWeíre extremely pleased that the licence is in place and that work on realising this project can continue,Ē said Salmon Evolution managing director Ingjarl SkarvÝy. ďWeíve had a good dialogue with those involved while our application has been under consideration and have received much positive response to our concept.Ē

    Bring innovation
    Tove HenÝen, chair of Frśna council, said: ďThis land-based farm will put MÝre og Romsdal on the map in the development of Norwegian aquaculture from a sustainable perspective.

    ďItíll give the region valuable expertise and new jobs and will bring innovation and the development of exciting projects in its wake.Ē

    SkarvÝy said land-based fish farming would open new opportunities for exploiting marine resources, sludge and waste, either in a biogas plant or as fertiliser and soil improvers.

    Our concept on land creates opportunities to exploit existing resources in completely new ways, which in this case, both includes reusing energy and creating an optimum environment for the salmon with a stable temperature year-round

    Ingjarl SkarvÝy
    He sees a big potential in using the heat in waste water from the huge Nyhamna offshore gas processing plant situated on the island of Gossa, a couple of kilometres south of Indre HarÝy.

    ďOur concept on land creates opportunities to exploit existing resources in completely new ways, which in this case, both includes reusing energy and creating an optimum environment for the salmon with a stable temperature year-round,Ē said SkarvÝy.

    Although the Salmon Evolution plant would be Europeís largest land farm to date, SkarvÝy said: ďWeíre not so concerned about being the biggest. What we do will be for the benefit of the fish and the environment and create good conditions for a sustainable industry.Ē

    Long-term partners
    He is confident the company can attract the investment necessary to meet the huge cost of the project.

    ďWe havenít approached possible investors yet, but have noted great interest in the project,Ē said SkarvÝy. ďWe want long-term partners and investors who can help to develop our business model and a sustainable change of pace in salmon farming.

    ďThe pace of innovation in the aquaculture sector is high, and our nation is the world leader for traditional cage-based farming in the sea, closed systems, more offshore-related solutions and land-based concepts. So, the level of interest is understandable Ė a lot of people want to participate in this adventure.Ē

    Published 02.07.2018 10:57 (Updated 02.07.2018 11:33)
    Salmon RAS Norway Salmon Evolution

  2. #2
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    Default

    Hopefully we are heading in to a new era of aquaculture.

    Cheers

    Mows

  3. #3
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    Default Excuse me

    Please excuse me for being pessimistic !!


    Quote Originally Posted by mows View Post
    Hopefully we are heading in to a new era of aquaculture.

    Cheers

    Mows

  4. #4
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    At least itís a chance.

    I agree, as long as there are economical interests in doing what has been done that successfully for big profit before, itís of marginal effect, in short sight. Political decisions would be necessary and control of the free market. There is the origin problem.
    As in many other aspects, the market itself will not regulate it to a positive result for the wild salmon fast.

    Nevertheless if there will come political decisions or not.
    There is hope in other directions. The big Asian market. They are well known for copying. Why should they not produce their own farmed salmons in future? There is technique, manpower and there is money to be invested. They prefer to protect and serve the own market.

    Maybe no more need to import it from Norway and Scotland in these huge amounts. Maybe a chance for the European wild salmon in long term effect.

    And for the customers in Europe, there are many other sources of Protein food.
    Here itís a lack of information for the average customers, how itís produced, what effects are done to the environment and what they put themselves on the table.
    The alternative land based production will soon take itís chance in marketing and will pray itís benefits against the sea based production. They will take their part in information to make their profit.
    As long as the European customers want their salmon, price isnít the main factor, when itís produced land based.

    Here in Bavaria a prawn production was opened, land based, with high standards for both, the environment and the quality of product.
    They are very successfull and are planning to open up another location.

    Itís a chance.
    - Letīs be intolerant to intolerance - to protect tolerance -
    "paradox of tolerance"
    (British-Austrian philosopher Sir K. R. Popper, The Open Society and Its Enemies)

  5. #5
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    Default Feed

    It won't make the slightest difference where they have them - they're taking a huge proportion of the high-lipid diet for salmon and sea-trout out of the North Sea and North Atlantic to be ground down for aquaculture pellets ( sandeels / capelin ).

    With GW they're looking at salmon- farming in Greenland now - THE END IS NEAR

    River Etne, in Western Norway, over 60% of the run is of farm-escapees.


    Quote Originally Posted by wetwader View Post
    At least itís a chance.

    I agree, as long as there are economical interests in doing what has been done that successfully for big profit before, itís of marginal effect, in short sight. Political decisions would be necessary and control of the free market. There is the origin problem.
    As in many other aspects, the market itself will not regulate it to a positive result for the wild salmon fast.

    Nevertheless if there will come political decisions or not.
    There is hope in other directions. The big Asian market. They are well known for copying. Why should they not produce their own farmed salmons in future? There is technique, manpower and there is money to be invested. They prefer to protect and serve the own market.

    Maybe no more need to import it from Norway and Scotland in these huge amounts. Maybe a chance for the European wild salmon in long term effect.

    And for the customers in Europe, there are many other sources of Protein food.
    Here itís a lack of information for the average customers, how itís produced, what effects are done to the environment and what they put themselves on the table.
    The alternative land based production will soon take itís chance in marketing and will pray itís benefits against the sea based production. They will take their part in information to make their profit.
    As long as the European customers want their salmon, price isnít the main factor, when itís produced land based.

    Here in Bavaria a prawn production was opened, land based, with high standards for both, the environment and the quality of product.
    They are very successfull and are planning to open up another location.

    Itís a chance.
    Last edited by Dave Wilkinson; 14-07-2018 at 06:36 AM.

  6. #6

    Default

    Sorry this is good news. Better on land than in the sea. Once we all see the benefits they may be forced to close the sea pens! Let's hope so.

  7. #7

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    Although good that its coming on land. The other big issue is the food. They take 4kg wild fish, ( sandeels, prawns, etc to produce 1 kg farmed **** ).
    Would it be possible they use off ***** from the fish factory ( heads, guts, skin, etc )to make the pellets. I also heard, soya, with sea weed for the omega 3, they need has been tried. )
    The more these farms expand in any way, it the destruction of the bottom the food chain that going become a major issue.

  8. #8

    Default

    I get that but we are already feeding it to fish that are in the sea. So I agree it is better they are all on land. Move it all on land. Fish are actually very good at converting food to fish meat. A better argument would be against feeding it to chickens and pigs. They are much poorer at converting food to meat. Better still ban the use of fishmeal and protect the bottom of the food chain, but blaming its use on fish farming alone is short sighted in my opinion.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wilkinson View Post
    It won't make the slightest difference where they have them - they're taking a huge proportion of the high-lipid diet for salmon and sea-trout out of the North Sea and North Atlantic to be ground down for aquaculture pellets ( sandeels / capelin ).

    With GW they're looking at salmon- farming in Greenland now - THE END IS NEAR

    River Etne, in Western Norway, has over 60% of the run is of farm-escapees.
    Dave,
    I understand your arguments and agree so far as it should be seen critical in the efficiency of producing fish or animals. Itís a real problem if in need to take more of food than we get out in food for the humans on this planet. It will be one of the main problems with new solutions needed for the future.

    But here we have at least one step to come away from the sea based aquaculture for salmons.
    As long as there are less informed people wanting farmed salmon, we canít avoid salmon farming. Same about ďpigs and steaksĒ... canít be avoided. Most of the people are still consuming, some with thoughts and control meanwhile, some without.

    And to your second argument:
    The land based farmed salmon will have some difficulties in running up to Norwegian or Scottish rivers. At least I hope so, as long as they donít have too much genetic changes ...
    - Letīs be intolerant to intolerance - to protect tolerance -
    "paradox of tolerance"
    (British-Austrian philosopher Sir K. R. Popper, The Open Society and Its Enemies)

  10. #10
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    Default Misunderstood

    The situation you present in your point one is correct save that it is already huge problem.

    But this is an aquaculture problem per se and not just salmon farms.

    But since Norway is to double salmon aquaculture to c 2m tonnes, I believe that one pilot project will not stop the Etne-type problem from continuing.


    Quote Originally Posted by wetwader View Post
    Dave,
    I understand your arguments and agree so far as it should be seen critical in the efficiency of producing fish or animals. Itís a real problem if in need to take more of food than we get out in food for the humans on this planet. It will be one of the main problems with new solutions needed for the future.

    But here we have at least one step to come away from the sea based aquaculture for salmons.
    As long as there are less informed people wanting farmed salmon, we canít avoid salmon farming. Same about ďpigs and steaksĒ... canít be avoided. Most of the people are still consuming, some with thoughts and control meanwhile, some without.

    And to your second argument:
    The land based farmed salmon will have some difficulties in running up to Norwegian or Scottish rivers. At least I hope so, as long as they donít have too much genetic changes ...
    Last edited by Dave Wilkinson; 14-07-2018 at 08:37 AM.

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